Friday, June 13, 2014

TSA Week in Review – Explosives Training Kit, Speargun, 80 Credit Card Knives, 51 Guns, and More



IED Training Kit (HNL)
IED Training Kit (HNL)
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert hand grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must resolve the alarm to determine the level of threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.

    Inert Detonators (BHM)
    Inert Detonators (BHM)
  • An improvised explosives device (IED) training kit was discovered in a checked bag at Honolulu (HNL). We understand that instructors and others in this type of business need these items, but instructors needing to travel with inert explosives training aids should plan ahead and contact their preferred shipper about mailing the items to their destination.
  • Three inert detonators were discovered in a carry-on bag at Birmingham (BHM).

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure prohibited items are not inside. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 
 
(Left - Right) Lipstick Knife (DEN), Gel Packs (FLL), Comb Dagger (STL)
(Left - Right) Lipstick Knife (DEN), Gel Packs (FLL), Comb Dagger (STL)

  • 80 credit card knives were discovered this week at checkpoints. Twelve were discovered at San Francisco (SAN), nine at Kansas City (MCI), nine at Minneapolis (MSP), eight at St. Louis (STL), seven at Nashville (BNA), five at Tampa (TPA), five at Grand Rapids (GRR), three at Fargo (FAR), two at Bismarck (BIS), two at Long Beach (LGB), two at Manchester (MHT), two at Minot (MOT), and the remainder were discovered at Beaumont (BPT), Billings (BIL),Cincinnati (CVG), Columbia (CAE), Dickinson (DIK), Fort Lauderdale (FLL), Fort Smith (FSM), Kalamazoo (AZO), Mobile (MOB), Orange County (SNA), Sarasota (SRQ), Shreveport (SHV), Traverse City (TVC), and Williston (ISN). Check out this blog post for more information on credit card knives.
  • A Fort Lauderdale passenger attempted to bring several unfrozen gel packs in her carry-on bag. After being told they were prohibited, she stated she would have them checked with her luggage. Upon returning to the checkpoint, she alarmed the advanced imaging technology in her breast and buttocks area. Prior to secondary screening, the passenger admitted she had placed the gel packs around her sensitive areas.
  • A 3-inch knife in was discovered in a passenger’s shoe at Manchester (MHT).
  • A belt buckle knife was discovered at LaGuardia (LGA).  
  • A comb dagger was discovered in a carry-on bag at St. Louis (STL).
  • Two lipstick knives were discovered this week in carry-on bags at Denver (DEN), and Louisville (SDF).
Speargun Discovered in Carry-on Bag at Denver
Speargun Discovered in Carry-on Bag at Denver

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and a lot of sharp pointy things…

Stun Guns18 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation: Two were discovered at Sacramento (SMF), two at San Diego (SAN), and the remainder were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), Baltimore (BWI), Denver (DEN), Jackson (JAN), Jacksonville (JAX), Kansas City (MCI), Kotzebue (OTZ), Little Rock (LIT), Nashville (BNA), Oklahoma City (OKC), San Francisco (SFO), San Juan (SJU), Shreveport (SHV), and St. Louis (STL).

51 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 51 firearms, 42 were loaded and 11 had rounds chambered.
(L-R /T-B) Guns Discovered at MSY, JAN, COU, and PBG
(L-R /T-B) Guns Discovered at MSY, JAN, COU, and PBG
(L-R) Guns Discovered at IAH, SEA, OAJ
(L-R) Guns Discovered at IAH, SEA, OAJ 
(L-R /T-B) Guns Discovered at RFD, OKC, BNA, and SGF
(L-R /T-B) Guns Discovered at RFD, OKC, BNA, and SGF
51 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 51 firearms, 42 were loaded and 11 had rounds chambered.
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

53 comments:

Kurt Roberts said...

How many of these scaaaaaaaary credit card knives are usually found each week?

Did you know that almost 12,000,000 people fly each week?

Did you know that 80 non-terrorists carrying credit cards knives is only .0006% of all passengers who flew that week?

Are you aware that an unloaded gun can't shoot bullets because it's unloaded?

Did you notice that the 42 guns found this week is typical for any week over the past several years?

Did you know that 42 people out of the 12,000,000 people who flew last week is only .0003%?

How do your bosses prove themselves to their bosses with such statistically insignificant blotter posts each week?

Why do your bosses let you get away with wasting so many tax dollars with this insignificant claptrap?

Screenshot? Oh yes.

RB said...

How much medical nitroglycerin lifesaving medicine did TSA screeners confiscate this week?

Anonymous said...

Why TSA's PreCheck program has failed to keep its promise to business travelers


http://m.bizjournals.com/bizjournals/blog/seat2B/2014/06/why-tsas-precheck-program-has-failed-to-keepits.html?page=all&r=full

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''
TSA receiving praise so richly deserved.

Anonymous said...

That is really scary to think about.

Anonymous said...

Wow the body scanners detected something. Too bad it wasn't a threat to the plane. If the gel packs were frozen, would they have been allowed? If so, why is that? It's the same material, just in a different state.

The TSA needs to end the "War on Liquids". You have posted in this blog that you can test liquids. You don't have to test every liquid unless something is suspicious. You can use random testing and be just as effective. Plus you already know liquids aren't a threat. All of these so called "dangerous" liquids are thrown into a regular trashcan right next to the checkpoint.

Anonymous said...

I believe if you put up a LARGE sign at the entrance to the terminal that can't be missed saying: If you enter with a gun,or knife, etc, YOU WILL GO To JAIL that would stop most of the problem. Ed Martin

RB said...

Based on information from the website of Piedmont Triad airport there are about 2,200 travelers per day departing GSO. How many TSA employees are assigned to GSO in order to handle this passenger load?

Are any of these TSA employees trained to confiscate medical nitroglycerin?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Wow! That is a lot of firearms!

Well, again, not really. How many passengers did you screen this week? These 51 firearms represent what percentage of travellers?

I'm not saying you shouldn't be screening for guns because that is your job. What I am saying is it is kind of embarrassing for you to be expecting gold stars when you haven't done anything other than your job. Gold stars are reserved for going above and beyond.

Anonymous said...

 Anonymous said...That is really scary to think about.June 13, 2014 at 9:45 P-----
--------------------------
It truly is scary that this country has allowed our civil rights to be badly damaged by the likes of TSA and its blue shirts.

RB said...

Why is TSA Administrator John S. Pistole afraid of making a definitive statement saying that prescribed medical nitroglycerin is not only allowed but that TSA screeners may not confiscate these types of items.?

RB said...

Why would an explosive training kit be more acceptable for being shipped by a "preferred shipper"? Aren't they also screening for dangerous items hidden in other materials? Seems that TSA just has no means to make decisions.

Confiscate lifesaving medicine.........Check
Confiscate lifesaving training aids....Check
Put people at risk with stupid policies....

CHECK

TSA a bigger threat to safety than terrorist.

Mike Toreno said...

The bizjournal article is wrong; the √úbermenschen lane is working great now. I have done the Shoe Carnival only twice in the last year. The complaint about people not knowing what they're doing is now invalid; for the last month or more they have explained to people and everybody in the line knows the drill and doesn't go any slower than anybody else. I have gotten it consistently; missed 3 times since 2012. The bizjournal article is not complaining about anything real; it is complaining that the hoi polloi are being given a service that should supposedly be reserved for "elites". The √úbermenschen program is the only program the TSA has done right; what is bad about it is that it isn't made available to everyone. There is no threat of an attack on an airplane that can be stopped by screening. Intrusive screening slows down the line and distracts the clerks so that they try to look for too many things and therefore miss 70% of guns. Putting everybody through noninvasive screening would improve safety and give passengers a better experience. The War on Water should be abandoned, 50% or more of the TSA employees should be fired, and everybody should get the same (noninvasive) screening. But complaints that "unworthies" are being given a government service should be treated with the scorn they deserve.

Marsha x3 said...

"Anonymous said...

I believe if you put up a LARGE sign at the entrance to the terminal that can't be missed saying: If you enter with a gun,or knife, etc, YOU WILL GO To JAIL that would stop most of the problem. Ed Martin
June 14, 2014 at 9:30 AM"


Since it isn't illegal in some cities, counties, or states to carry a weapon in public, including into an airport, your sign is untrue.

Also, it appears that most of the people who do carry a gun into the screening area do so because they forgot the weapon was in their bag, so your threat is moot.

RB said...

What I find so sad about TSA and in particular the TSA employees involved in the TSA Blog is the manner in which they deal with the public when serious topics are raised here.

These are the behaviors that I see from our TSA Blog civil servants.

Ignore

Equivocate

Hide

Denial

Dishonesty

Refusal to engage in thoughtful discussion

Are these the kinds of people that should be receiving paychecks that are derived from our tax dollars?

Once again TSA blog.

What is TSA's policy regarding people who travel with medically prescribed nitroglycerin medicines? Will they have their lifesaving medicine confiscated by TSA policy or by some poorly trained TSA screener?

Most importantly what recourse does a traveler have when encountering this situation, other than surrendering the medicine, at a TSA checkpoint?

Perhaps a 24 hour manned TSA passenger emergency hotline with the authority to overrule all airport TSA personnel should be established to assist travelers with situations where TSA employees are doing things that just make no sense.

I can envision a Direct Connection Emergency Red Phone with large signage designating such at each and every TSA checkpoint solely for travelers use.

We are way past the point where travelers have no means to defend themselves for TSA.



Anonymous said...

PASSENGERS TELL ME THAT THE TSA IS NOW CONFISCATING CELL PHONE CHARGER CORDS.
IS THIS TRUE AND IF SO, WHY? WILL THE RECHARGEABLE CORDS TO MY CAMERAS BE NEXT WHEN I GO ON VACATION!

Anonymous said...

Regarding the post by Kurt Roberts . . . I don't care if 42 guns are just 0.0003% of the millions of passengers who fly-- that is 42 too many. What is scary to me is that these people think that the law somehow does not apply to them. And that being the case, just what other laws will these people find that also do not apply to them. Put them in jail.

Anonymous said...

Great work searching a dangerous person at LAX. Mini-Me had the audacity to believe he could sneak past the vigilant TSOs. He was wrong.

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
PASSENGERS TELL ME THAT THE TSA IS NOW CONFISCATING CELL PHONE CHARGER CORDS.
IS THIS TRUE AND IF SO, WHY? WILL THE RECHARGEABLE CORDS TO MY CAMERAS BE NEXT WHEN I GO ON VACATION!

June 16, 2014 at 1:31 PM
.......................
Next thing to go will be shoelaces.

TSA is already treating the flying public like convicts. Why not go all the way.

Anonymous said...

"...What is scary to me is that these people think that the law somehow does not apply to them. And that being the case, just what other laws will these people find that also do not apply to them. Put them in jail."

Since none of them were put in jail you should put your fears aside because it turns out none of them had any intention of hurting you or anyone else.

Anonymous said...

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper refusing to post, let alone answer, questions about the number of pat-downs caused by false alarms from the slow, invasive, untested naked body scanners TSA continues to use despite their abundant failure to detect anything dangerous, ever?

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "PASSENGERS TELL ME THAT THE TSA IS NOW CONFISCATING CELL PHONE CHARGER CORDS.
IS THIS TRUE AND IF SO, WHY? WILL THE RECHARGEABLE CORDS TO MY CAMERAS BE NEXT WHEN I GO ON VACATION!"

I have not heard of cell phone charger cords not being allowed through. If you have a link to something that indicates what you are saying here, I would appreciate you posting it for us. Cell phone or camera recharging cords are not on the prohibited list, so they are allowed through both carryon and checked baggage.

West
TSA Blog Team

Bubba said...

In what way are gel packs concealed in the breast area a threat to aviation?

Again, full body scanners detected absolutely nothing dangerous that metal detectors (which are cheaper, faster, non-invasive and have much less false positives) would not have detected.

Why are these horrid machines still in use??

Susan Richart said...

"...so they are allowed through both carryon and checked baggage."

Unless, of course, some screener decides he/she is not going to allow recharging cords.

screen shot/DHS OIG Statement

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Anon sez - "PASSENGERS TELL ME THAT THE TSA IS NOW CONFISCATING CELL PHONE CHARGER CORDS.
IS THIS TRUE AND IF SO, WHY? WILL THE RECHARGEABLE CORDS TO MY CAMERAS BE NEXT WHEN I GO ON VACATION!"

I have not heard of cell phone charger cords not being allowed through. If you have a link to something that indicates what you are saying here, I would appreciate you posting it for us. Cell phone or camera recharging cords are not on the prohibited list, so they are allowed through both carryon and checked baggage.

West
TSA Blog Team

June 17, 2014 at 12:38 PM

=======================

Is medical nitroglycerin medicines allowed through all TSA checkpoints?

If so and some TSA screener attempts to prevent someone from taking their medicine with them what recourse does the person have at that given moment?

Tom Harvey said...

My overall experience is that TSA personnel are efficient and courteous. Maybe not perfect but better on average than employees of commercial enterprises. Of course, government agencies have service as their mission and businesses have only a duty to make profits.

Anonymous said...

West,

Why does the TSA allow phone charging cords or laptop power cords? They could potentially be used as weapons to strangle someone or beat someone with the power brick. The TSA doesn't allow water bottles over a certain size because they are potentially dangerous. Yet they just get thrown in a regular trash can next to the checkpoint instead of being properly disposed of like something that could be explosive.

RB said...

TSA is using randomizers to select some travelers for for PreCheck.

PreCheck is supposedly a Risk Based decisioning program to move passengers who are known to be less of a risk to a streamlined screening.

So exactly how does the use of a randomizer meet any objectives of Risk Based decision determinations?

TSA proves to the public that what TSA does is something completely different than security.

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez "Is medical nitroglycerin medicines allowed through all TSA checkpoints?"

According to the "Can I take" App at tsa.gov, yes.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...RB sez "Is medical nitroglycerin medicines allowed through all TSA checkpoints?"According to the "Can I take" App at tsa.gov, yes.WestTSA Blog TeamJune 18, 2014 at 4:44 AM
?.....................
Ok, I went to the TSA "Can I Take"app, entered "nitroglycerin medicine" and the app returned my query with "item not found".

Even if it was listed, which it is not, what recourse does a person have if some screener decides to not allow a given item.

Susan Richart said...

Nowhere that I can find does the TSA make a statement that one can fly with nitroglycerin pills.

If one does a search for "nitroglycerin pills" on the TSA website the response begins with:

http://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?src=tsawebsite

"TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.

We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process."

And ends with:

"Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

You know full well, West, that the final sentence means that a screener may refuse to allow any item he or she chooses, including nitroglycerin pills.

You are once again being disingenuous, West.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Just a follow up on the TSA app, "Can I Bring MY".

I have entered several name brands of angina medicines and get no useful results from TSA's flaunted application.

In other words it is useless!

That takes us back to an earlier post I submitted and this refusal to engage in meaningful discussion of an important discussion:

"These are the behaviors that I see from our TSA Blog civil servants.

Ignore

Equivocate

Hide

Denial

Dishonesty

Refusal to engage in thoughtful discussion."

And while I was reading up on the various forms of medical nitroglycerin I found this little jewel at WebMD. Another no confidence vote for TSA:

""Does your bra really go up that high?" the TSA officer asked, running her hands along my chest. My boyfriend, Adam, and I were headed for a romantic getaway, and being held at airport security wasn't on our itinerary. "I have a pacemaker.  That's a scar, not my bra," I said. "You're too young for that," she said. While I'm not the only 26-year-old with a pacemaker, I'm the only one most security officers have seen. Of the pacemakers installed yearly, 84% are for people older than age 65. Only 6%..."

Who is the larger threat to my safety, TSA or Terrorist?

I suggest TSA wins that contest hands down.

Anonymous said...

I did a web search and found nothing about TSA screeners confiscating Nitro pills. In my opinion this is a false story to make TSA look bad.

Medication is allowed in carry-on bags.

Susan Richart said...

'Anonymous said...

I did a web search and found nothing about TSA screeners confiscating Nitro pills. In my opinion this is a false story to make TSA look bad.

Medication is allowed in carry-on bags."

Your search skills leave a lot to be desired:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/22977669-post78.html

In addition, there is at least one more link that I have already posted someplace on this blog.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

On another topic, here's a recitation of a traveler refusing to go to a private room after a "positive" ETD alarm:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/23051100-post28.html

Stand your ground and refuse to go to any private room with a TSA screener.

screen shot/DHS OIG state

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I did a web search and found nothing about TSA screeners confiscating Nitro pills. In my opinion this is a false story to make TSA look bad.

Medication is allowed in carry-on bags.

June 18, 2014 at 9:31 AM
........................
It has happened and it is on the web.

The issue is if this problem is just some screeners who are improperly trained or a larger TSA wide problem.

That is what this discussion is trying to find out along with an announcement that TSA screeners are not permitted to confiscate or compel people to surrender their medicines.

Now how hard would it be for TSA legal or even TSA Administrator Pistole to respond to this issue.

If a TSA screener thinks they have an illegal item such as an explosive they should call police, the only people who can investigate a possible crime.

It is pretty clear that TSA could care less about a travelers health and safety.

Allowing front line screeners to not allow lifesaving medicines, which is in fact TSA's policy, should result in the screener and all supervisory personnel in the chain of command going to jail.

Anonymous said...

Do you check Chicago airports like O'Hare and Midway? Don't ever see them listed as one of your airports where they found anything, and can't believe they don't find anything, since it's the most violent city in the country!!

RB said...

It has been over a year since TSA posted the court ordered NPRM for using Electronic Strip Search Machines.

When are the results of the publics comments going to be released?

As we all know the publics comments were strongly not supportive of TSA using these devices. Will TSA defy the publics guidance in this matter?

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez "Is medical nitroglycerin medicines allowed through all TSA checkpoints?"

According to the "Can I take" App at tsa.gov, yes.

West
TSA Blog Team

June 18, 2014 at 4:44 AM

........................
Ok West, I am going to repost an earlier response of yours and we will go through it line by line and see if medical nitroglycerin medicines are actually allowed.

............................
Your post:

"GSOLTSO said...

TSA policy according to what I have found is that Nitro pills are accepted in both carry on and checked baggage. The "Can I Take" app on the TSA main webpage yeilds (sic) the following search results:

"Search Results For:

nitro pills

Check or Carry-on
TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.


Nowhere in this passage is medical nitroglycerin medicine specifically mentioned. The passage is nothing more than a recitation of TSA general policies. Secondly, at no point was a discussion of larger amounts of any medicine asked about. In fact the passage is discussing medically necessary LGA's.

We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

This passage has no bearing on the question of whether Nitro pills are allowed or not.

You may carry non-medically necessary liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on bags only if they adhere to the 3-1-1 rule: containers must be 3.4 ounces or less; stored in a 1 quart/liter zip-top bag; 1 zip-top bag per person. Larger amounts of non-medicinal liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in checked baggage.

Non-medical LGA discussion. Not pertinent to the question of Nitro pills

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

And this passage is actually the only one that gives any kind of guidance on Nitro pills and clearly states that TSA may not allow lifesaving medicine at the risk of death to the traveler for any reason or for no reason. An unqualified TSA screener making medical life or death decisions. Clearly an unacceptable situation!

I hope that this helps to answer your questions.

West
TSA Blog Team
June 9, 2014 at 8:16 AM"


No it does not help and I will state again that nothing that you are anyone else with TSA has provided responds to thsee simple questions;

Is medical nitroglycerin medicines unconditionally allowed through TSA Checkpoints? I want to remind you and the rest of TSA that medical nitroglycerin is not explosive nor can it be made into an explosive. It is a non-threat item.

If not allowed then by what authority does a TSA screener have to interfere with a persons medical care?

What recourse does a person have if they encounter a TSA screener who attempts to not allow a travelers life saving medicines?

Anonymous said...

Susan Richart said...
'Anonymous said...

I did a web search and found nothing about TSA screeners confiscating Nitro pills. In my opinion this is a false story to make TSA look bad.

Medication is allowed in carry-on bags."

Your search skills leave a lot to be desired:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/22977669-post78.html

====================================================================

Yours are just as bad then. This is NOT a credible source. This was back in 2006. Wake up, this is 2014, not 8 years ago.

Susan Richart said...

Try again, Anonymous. The 2006 date is the date the poster joined the FlyerTalk community.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

Your last post is great, RB!

It is beyond me that West believes the responses he is giving both here and on FT even begin to address the question.

If he were totally honest, he would state that as TSA regs are currently written, there is no guarantee that you will be able to take your prescribed nitroglycerin medication with you on a plane.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

Further, Mr. Anonymous who can't seem to do a search or understand the results he gets from that search:

A family regaled us with all kinds of TSA stories, from the confiscation of the dad's nitro pills (yes, really...no problem dying of a heart attack as long as we are safe from terrorists wielding tiny white pills) to a relative in NY who was told by a TSA screener to get back in line "or I'll cut your throat"! (This, in front of the man's young son, who became frightened, believing this to be a very real threat, thanks to the fake cop uniform.) By the way, since they confiscate the life-saving nitro pills, now when Dad must travel, he simply hides them, unlabeled, and of course the TSA never notices a thing."

The above was on Alaskans Freedom to Travel USA Facebook page from January, 2013.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

TSA Confiscates Pregnant Woman's Insulin, Ice Packs
Security Tells Woman Isulin Vial Was An Explosives Risk

Written by Marc Stewart, 7News Reporter

POSTED: 9:55 pm MDT August 4, 2011
UPDATED: 8:01 am MDT August 5, 2011

DENVER -- A Denver couple has filed a formal complaint with the Transportation Security Administration after a pregnant woman's insulin and ice packs were confiscated by screeners at Denver International Airport.

The couple has traveled around the world with her medical supplies, including insulin and syringes, and have never encountered any troubles before, they said.

"It made me feel upset and made me feel somewhat helpless," said Aaron Nieman.

Nieman's wife was traveling alone to a baby shower in Phoenix when she was questioned by a TSA agent as she went through security around 4 p.m. Thursday.

"He's like, 'Well, you're a risk.' I'm like, 'Excuse me?' And he's like, 'This is a risk ... I can't tell you why again. But this is at risk for explosives,'” Nieman's wife said. She asked 7NEWS not to use her name for fear of retaliation for speaking out.

"I got a bottle of nail polish. I got hair spray bottles. I got needles that are syringes. But yet I can't take through my actual insulin?” she asked.

More: http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/28773212/detail.html

.............................
West is Insulin permitted through a TSA checkpoint?

Apparently not from this report.

Susan Richart said...

And from Alton Brown's FB page:

"They took my nitro heart pills out of my coat pocket with out telling me even though it was labled and unopened."

Care to try again with the "it's a false story" line?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Susan Richart said...
'Anonymous said...

I did a web search and found nothing about TSA screeners confiscating Nitro pills. In my opinion this is a false story to make TSA look bad.

Medication is allowed in carry-on bags."

Your search skills leave a lot to be desired:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/22977669-post78.html

====================================================================

Yours are just as bad then. This is NOT a credible source. This was back in 2006. Wake up, this is 2014, not 8 years ago.

June 19, 2014 at 10:57 AM
=================================
A person who had their nitro pills confiscated is an active poster on a well read travel forum. I don't think it matters much on when it happened. The question remains, can a person travel with medicine unmolested by TSA. The answer is clearly no. not in every case. That brings us to the point of exactly what qualifications do TSA screeners have to make medical decisions. In my opinion any screener depriving a person of a medicine has just opened the door to a very serious legal question and if they acted outside of TSA SOP could be held personally liable. And if some TSA employee expects government to bail them out if they did something against SOP I think I have a bridge to sell that they would be interested in.

This is really a simple question and one that TSA should be eager to answer but as we all see TSA is again hiding and not being accountable to a question from the public.

I have to wonder just who's side TSA is on?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Susan Richart said...
'Anonymous said...

I did a web search and found nothing about TSA screeners confiscating Nitro pills. In my opinion this is a false story to make TSA look bad.

Medication is allowed in carry-on bags."

Your search skills leave a lot to be desired:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/22977669-post78.html

====================================================================

Yours are just as bad then. This is NOT a credible source. This was back in 2006. Wake up, this is 2014, not 8 years ago.


data from years past is used all the time on here to describe tsa. a perfect example is the failure percentage rate of tsa testing. if you look on the internet for "facts" to support your agenda you can find whatever you are looking for. perhaps this is why the tsa does not respond to most of the quesitons on here.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Susan Richart said...
'Anonymous said...

I did a web search and found nothing about TSA screeners confiscating Nitro pills. In my opinion this is a false story to make TSA look bad.

Medication is allowed in carry-on bags."

Your search skills leave a lot to be desired:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/22977669-post78.html

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Yours are just as bad then. This is NOT a credible source. This was back in 2006. Wake up, this is 2014, not 8 years ago.

June 19, 2014 at 10:57 AM
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You are badly misinformed.

The source is valid. If you want to interject time into the equation then let us talk about a one off shoe bomber that has only happened once and even before 2006. Or the supposed liquid threat was only talk and never developed.

TSA does not allow Clear Care brand and other similar contact lens cleaning solutions because they contains minuscule amounts of hydrogen peroxide.

TSA claims that they are testing for explosives when the real facts tell us that they are testing for certain chemicals that could be in an explosive but are commonly found in many everyday products such as hand lotions, soap, OTC medical items and the list goes on.

TSA's ETD testing is just as incompetent as the rest of TSA.

Anonymous said...

"I believe if you put up a LARGE sign at the entrance to the terminal that can't be missed saying: If you enter with a gun,or knife, etc, YOU WILL GO To JAIL that would stop most of the problem."

"I don't care if 42 guns are just 0.0003% of the millions of passengers who fly-- that is 42 too many. What is scary to me is that these people think that the law somehow does not apply to them... Put them in jail."


But large bottles of water are prohibited because they also represent a potential danger to a plane! Should you go to jail when you forget you have a bottle of water in your bag? Be careful what you wish for...

Anonymous said...

I have a question related to this:

"On another topic, here's a recitation of a traveler refusing to go to a private room after a "positive" ETD alarm:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/23051100-post28.html"

Can a traveler get the second patdown from a police officer instead of going to a private room?

Anonymous said...

As for the TSA: throw your nitroglycerin bottle along with your keys, wallet, change and cell phone in an outer pocket of your carry on. They almost assured will not even notice that it is there. If they did see it, they wouldn't care. Nitroglycerin bottles are very recognizable for what they are.

RB said...

 Anonymous said..."I believe if you put up a LARGE sign at the entrance to the terminal that can't be missed saying: If you enter with a gun,or knife, etc, YOU WILL GO To JAIL that would stop most of the problem.""I don't care if 42 guns are just 0.0003% of the millions of passengers who fly-- that is 42 too many. What is scary to me is that these people think that the law somehow does not apply to them... Put them in jail.

"But large bottles of water are prohibited because they also represent a potential danger to a plane!

Should you go to jail when you forget you have a bottle of water in your bag? Be careful what you wish for...June 20, 2014 at 4:09 PM
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If LGA's actually presented a real risk do you believe that TSA would dispose of these things in regular trash bins right at the checkpoint?

TSA's actions in this area prove there is no risk or that TSA is completely incompetent in risk management.

Which is it TSA?

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...

"data from years past is used all the time on here to describe tsa. a perfect example is the failure percentage rate of tsa testing. if you look on the internet for "facts" to support your agenda you can find whatever you are looking for. perhaps this is why the tsa does not respond to most of the quesitons on here."

And on this point, you are wrong. The number of 70% may be old, but, according to much more recent GAO reports, the number has changed very little over time. Using simply logic, that means if it's ever been 70% (which the TSA freely admits) then it must still be near 70%. Use a little logic.