Friday, June 6, 2014

TSA Week in Review – 18 Firearms Discovered in One Day


One of the 18 firearms discovered on June 4th.This one was discovered at Memphis (MEM).
One of the 18 firearms discovered on June 4th.This one was discovered at Memphis (MEM).

Record Number of Firearms Discovered in One Day - On June 4, 18 firearms were discovered around the country in carry-on bags. That broke the previous record of 13 set in 2013.

47 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 47 firearms, 36 were loaded and 10 had rounds chambered. See a complete list and more photos at the bottom of this post.

Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert hand grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must resolve the alarm to determine the level of threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.

Two inert grenades were discovered in carry-on bags this week at Houston (HOU),and Palm Beach (PBI).
Two inert grenades were discovered in carry-on bags this week at Houston (HOU),and Palm Beach (PBI).
Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure prohibited items are not inside. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 

  • 45 credit card knives were discovered this week at checkpoints. Twelve were discovered at Minneapolis (MSP), eight at Nashville (BNA), six at Kansas City (MCI), six at San Francisco (SFO), six at Tampa (TPA), three at St. Louis (STL), and the remainder were discovered at Branson (BBG), Long Beach (LGB), Shreveport (SHV), and St. Petersburg (PIE). Check out this blog post for more information on credit card knives.
  • A knife was detected inside the lining of a bag behind the support column at Cleveland (CLE).
A knife was detected in the sole of a shoe at Los Angeles (LAX).
A knife was detected in the sole of a shoe at Los Angeles (LAX). 

What Not to Say at an Airport – Statements like these not only delay the people who said them but can also inconvenience many other passengers if the checkpoint or terminal has to be evacuated: 

  • After alarming the explosives trace detection machine at Midway (MDW), a traveler stated that she “wouldn’t mind blowing this whole place up.”
  • A traveler at Reno (RNO) waiting at the gate to board his plane began telling passengers that he had a bomb in his carry-on bag. There was no bomb in his bag.

Stun Guns14 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation: Four were discovered at Dallas Love (DAL), three at Las Vegas (LAS), two at Phoenix (PHX), and the remainder were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), Buffalo (BUF), Redmond (RDM), Norfolk (ORF), and St. Croix (STX).

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and a lot of sharp pointy things…


(L-R) Throwing Knives (RDU), Throwing Knives (SJC), Switchblade (MDW), Knuckle Blade (EWR)
(L-R) Throwing Knives (RDU), Throwing Knives (SJC), Switchblade (MDW), Knuckle Blade (EWR)
Airsoft Guns – An Airsoft gun was discovered this week in a carry-on bag at Pullman-Moscow (PUW). Airsoft guns are prohibited in carry-on bags, but allowed in checked baggage. Airsoft grenades are not permitted in checked or carry-on bags. Read this post for more information: TSA Travel Tips Tuesday: Traveling with Airsoft Guns
Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

Firearms Discovered This Week in Carry-On Bags 
(L-R) Derringers discovered at Washington Dulles (IAD) and Lynchburg (LYH).
(L-R) Derringers discovered at Washington Dulles (IAD) and Lynchburg (LYH).

Clockwise from top left - Firearms discovered at FLL, RDU, DEN, PHX, and JAN.
Clockwise from top left - Firearms discovered at FLL, RDU, DEN, PHX, and JAN.


Clockwise from top left - Firearms discovered at MEM, DAL, MCO, and SNA.
Clockwise from top left - Firearms discovered at MEM, DAL, MCO, and SNA.
47 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 47 firearms, 36 were loaded and 10 had rounds chambered.
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear, or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500.00. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

52 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thanks for all your hard work. I fly out of LAX-JFK a few times a year. I'm glad your here! Regards, Tom Poster

RB said...

Serious question that I would appreciate being answered.

It has been reported that some TSA screeners are confiscating medical nitroglycerin pills.

I think any sane person knows that these pills are not and cannot be converted to an explosive state due to adulterents added to the pills not to mention the very minute amount of active ingredient.Exactly what is TSA's policy regarding medical nitroglycerin pills? Is TSA aware that medical nitroglycerin is also prescribed in both patches and as an ointment? Are these forms of medical nitroglycerin also confiscated by TSA? 

What is the Risk Based analysis that would suggest the need to confiscate medical nitroglycerin, a non-explosive life saving medicine?

What the heck is TSA thinking? 

Anonymous said...

When will people learn?

Anonymous said...

KUDOS !!!

GREAT JOB TSA !!!

YOU ROCK !!!

Anonymous said...

Why are no weapons found in Chicago? Think someone needs to check better there. It has the worst crime in the country.

Malcolm Kantzler said...

I hope the majority of these findings are not resulting in arrests or criminal-record entries, because the sheer number of transgressions, though surprisingly large to me, is evidence that most are oversights or ignorance and not intent.

People forget. Travel, particularly airline, is stressful, even for a Shirley Temple, and people do get distracted. I would hope criminal response is reserved for cases where either supporting evidence of intent is found or previous record of violation exists, not initiated just on the basis of a found item that's classified as a weapon.

Anonymous said...

Post a photo of the people so we can see the type of individuals we are dealing with. And how many get arrested?
Sooner or later we all know one will get through, then what?

Anonymous said...

Was the blade that the Atlanta TSO used to stab his co-worker artfully concealed?

>> Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences
>> are all too frequent which is why
>> we talk about these finds.

Yet the number of guns found each week stays fairly steady. So isn't that kind of evidence that this blog is, well, failing?

Anonymous said...

After all the negative comments about TSA, today we should be greatful their securing our families and friends from another potential attack. Thank you TSA

Anonymous said...

It appears that summer has started and everyone at the blog is once again on vacation.

Susan Richart said...

"Anonymous said...

Post a photo of the people so we can see the type of individuals we are dealing with. And how many get arrested?
Sooner or later we all know one will get through, then what?"

Weapons get through every day and yet planes don't fall out of the sky and passengers aren't injured or killed.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Anonymous said...After all the negative comments about TSA, today we should be greatful their securing our families and friends from another potential attack. Thank you TSAJune 7, 2014 at 12:49 PM
________________________________

Why? TSA hides behind secrecy to avoid having to show the public just how ineffective the screening process is.

TSA hides behind secrecy to hide how invasive the so-called pat downs are by using words like resistance and hiding behind closed doors in some cases.

TSA hides behind secrecy to cover up employee misconduct from the public.

I see no reason to be greatful to TSA for lowering the bar of personal freedoms and moving this country several giant strides towards a police state.



TSA hides behind secrecy

RB said...

 RB said...June 4, 20:37 PM a question was posted asking what TSA policy was regarding medical nitroglycerin pills.

Time now is June 6, 07:20 and TSA has yet to respond.June 6, 2014 at 8:20 AM

Time is now June 8, 08:15 and still no response from TSA for a very simple question.

Susan Richart said...

RB wrote:

"TSA hides behind secrecy to hide how invasive the so-called pat downs are by using words like resistance and hiding behind closed doors in some cases."

Consider that the "behind closed doors" search is outside the scope of the TSA's authority:

"The first is that yes, a positive result on a swab would be an articulable reason, but in that case it is no longer an administrative search and has become a probable cause search, in which case TSA is not able to conduct it as they are not sworn LE. I can see this one being a winning proposition in an airport, if a person has the time and inclination to force the issue.

A second way to consider it is that the regime under which TSA swabs is neither consistent or scientific. They routinely do not follow their own procedures, let alone good testing procedure, nor do they submit their machines for regular calibration and testing. All of which means the results of the swabs are likely inadmissible as evidence of...well, anything. Obviously, arguing that in an airport is likely to be a losing proposition."

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/22990183-post18.html

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

" RB said...

RB said...June 4, 20:37 PM a question was posted asking what TSA policy was regarding medical nitroglycerin pills.

Time now is June 6, 07:20 and TSA has yet to respond.June 6, 2014 at 8:20 AM

Time is now June 8, 08:15 and still no response from TSA for a very simple question."

Two thumbs up, RB, for pressing this very important issue.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Susan Richart said..." RB said...RB said...June 4, 20:37 PM a question was posted asking what TSA policy was regarding medical nitroglycerin pills.Time now is June 6, 07:20 and TSA has yet to respond.June 6, 2014 at 8:20 AMTime is now June 8, 08:15 and still no response from TSA for a very simple question."Two thumbs up, RB, for pressing this very important issue.screen shot/DHS OIG statementJune 8, 2014 at 10:59 AM
----------------------------
I find it sad that TSA will not respond to a simple, legtimate question and takes the cowardly option of silence.

I will continue asking this question and will contact my Senator,Ted Cruz, requesting a Congressional Inquiry if that is what it will take to have this very simple questioned answered.

Travelers have an absolute right to know if TSA screeners are doing things that jeapordize our health and safety. What I want to know is if this is TSA policy or cases of screeners who are improperly trained.

RB said...

Why do TSA screeners need box cutter for?

Are box cutters used by TSA screeners inventoried and accounted for before and after each work shift?

TSA does keep track of the whereabouts of such dangerous items, correct?

GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "Exactly what is TSA's policy regarding medical nitroglycerin pills? Is TSA aware that medical nitroglycerin is also prescribed in both patches and as an ointment? Are these forms of medical nitroglycerin also confiscated by TSA?"

TSA policy according to what I have found is that Nitro pills are accepted in both carry on and checked baggage. The "Can I Take" app on the TSA main webpage yeilds the following search results:

"Search Results For:

nitro pills

Check or Carry-on
TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.
We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

You may carry non-medically necessary liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on bags only if they adhere to the 3-1-1 rule: containers must be 3.4 ounces or less; stored in a 1 quart/liter zip-top bag; 1 zip-top bag per person. Larger amounts of non-medicinal liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in checked baggage.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

I hope that this helps to answer your questions.

West
TSA Blog Team

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Wow! That is a lot of firearms!

Well, not really when you consider how many passengers moved through the system on that same day, something like a tiny fraction of a tiny fraction of one percent.

And how many of those fine folks were arrested? Are any of them being charged as terrorists?

@SkyWayManAz said...

RB said...

"TSA hides behind secrecy..."

They've been able to do this because "OMG 9/11! They didn't remember!!!" has been a deterrent to holding this agency accountable. Most of us want air travel to be safe using reasonable measures designed to cause minimum impact on the public. We also have concerns about what happens when you just throw money at a problem trying to fix it. GAO has started to question this recently over the BDO program. Congressional reports have recommended downsizing and privatizing many of TSA’s functions. Most disturbing though is even assuming a best case scenario TSA got scammed out of hundreds of millions with the Rapidscan AIT fiasco. Now I want to be clear I’m not publicly accusing anyone at the top of TSA of being in on it or on the take but honestly is there really any way to know that didn’t happen? That issue alone is suspicious enough it bears scrutiny. I'm not holding my breath it will ever happen. At least not unless some top official gets caught red handed stealing in a way not easily covered up. TSA has conceded there has been theft in the lower ranks that interact with the public so this is not a baseless or manufactured concern.

Susan Richart said...

Sorry, West, you lose.

The correct response is for the TSA to put out a statement that all prescribed medications, including nitroglycerin pills are allowed at all times.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

How many false alarms resulted from your use of slow, invasive naked body scanners?

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Rb sez - "Exactly what is TSA's policy regarding medical nitroglycerin pills? Is TSA aware that medical nitroglycerin is also prescribed in both patches and as an ointment? Are these forms of medical nitroglycerin also confiscated by TSA?"

TSA policy according to what I have found is that Nitro pills are accepted in both carry on and checked baggage. The "Can I Take" app on the TSA main webpage yeilds the following search results:

"Search Results For:

nitro pills

Check or Carry-on
TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.
We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

You may carry non-medically necessary liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on bags only if they adhere to the 3-1-1 rule: containers must be 3.4 ounces or less; stored in a 1 quart/liter zip-top bag; 1 zip-top bag per person. Larger amounts of non-medicinal liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in checked baggage.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

I hope that this helps to answer your questions.

West
TSA Blog Team


June 9, 2014 at 8:16 AM

.............................
No it does not answer the question. You can dance around the issue all you like but I will continue seeking an honest answer.

It is a very simple question. Are nitroglycerin pill that have been reported to have been confiscated by some TSA screeners allowed or are they not allowed.

A simple yes or no will suffice.

What medical expertise do TSA screeners have to determine if a person needs a particular medicine?

What TSA test can be applied to determine if pills of any kind are not what they seem to be?

If the ETD alarms on a small bottle of nitroglycerin pills that on visual inspection are just what they appear to be is that grounds to confiscate the item?

If TSA screeners are in fact confiscating medicine is that a faulty training issue or TSA policy?

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "It is a very simple question. Are nitroglycerin pill that have been reported to have been confiscated by some TSA screeners allowed or are they not allowed."

Nitroglycerin pills and patches are allowed in both carryon luggage and checked luggage.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "It is a very simple question. Are nitroglycerin pill that have been reported to have been confiscated by some TSA screeners allowed or are they not allowed."

Nitroglycerin pills and patches are allowed in both carryon luggage and checked luggage.

West
TSA Blog Team

June 9, 2014 at 10:31 AM

.........................
"Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.""
...........................
So what you are telling us is that no matter what TSA SOP may state a TSA screener can confiscate any item for no stated reason and the traveler has zero recourse.

That is simply not acceptable!

What medical training do TSA screeners have to determine if a person needs any particular medicine that has been prescribed by a Doctor?

And for you information medical nitroglycerin is also dispensed as an ointment.

I think what TSA is failing to understand in this particular discussion is that regardless of the results of any TSA testing medical nitroglycerin is not and cannot be made into an explosive. It cannot endanger the airplane, crew, or other passengers.

Also, if TSA ETD testing alarms on medical nitroglycerin then the testing process is faulty and cannot be relied upon.

West, the one passage you have posted is a discussing of "larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection."

That is not what this discussion centers around. A bottle of nitroglycerin pills is small and usually contained in a a glass vial that is kept in a typical plastic pill bottle.

http://theodoregray.com/periodictable/Samples/007.9/s7s.JPG

So why don't you take the time to run this question up the flagpole and get an official response from say the legal department of TSA.

@SkyWayManAz said...

Respectfully West you are evading giving a helpful response on the heart medication pills. You are giving a political answer that will let any poorly trained screeners off the hook for confiscating them. I'm not sure if this is a widespread problem or not with these specific pills. I do know it is a widespread problem your workforce is poorly trained when it comes to medical issues and routinely compromises passenger health and safety. Unfortunately like we see in the VA scandal some passenger may have to die first before the public backlash becomes to great to ignore.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "It is a very simple question. Are nitroglycerin pill that have been reported to have been confiscated by some TSA screeners allowed or are they not allowed."

Nitroglycerin pills and patches are allowed in both carryon luggage and checked luggage.

West
TSA Blog Team

June 9, 2014 at 10:31 AM
.................

Except when they are not.

Anonymous said...

RB Said:

" Serious question that I would appreciate being answered.

It has been reported that some TSA screeners are confiscating medical nitroglycerin pills."

Where was this reported? What Blog, News Report, Website etc. reported on this? Please post a link so that we may ALL read about this.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
RB Said:
"Serious question that I would appreciate being answered.
It has been reported that some TSA screeners are confiscating medical nitroglycerin pills."
Where was this reported? What Blog, News Report, Website etc. reported on this? Please post a link so that we may ALL read about this.
June 9, 2014 at 8:26 PM


Agreed. It would help if people would post links.

puddingtane said...

Nitro pills being confiscated:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/22977669-post78.html

Anonymous said...

How many false alarms from the naked body scanners?

RB said...

https://m.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=442725589128749&id=219727418071906

---------------------
Another account of TSA screeners confiscating life saving medicine.

TSA puts the public at greater risk than the very tiny slight chance of a terrorist attack.

TSA presents a greater danger to travelers than any other factor.

RB said...

So the TSA Blog Team retreats and buries its head in the sand.

I have a word for this situation but TSA would claim it's disparaging. Truth can be painful.

RB said...

@SkyWayManAz said...Respectfully West you are evading giving a helpful response on the heart medication pills. You are giving a political answer that will let any poorly trained screeners off the hook for confiscating them. I'm not sure if this is a widespread problem or not with these specific pills. I do know it is a widespread problem your workforce is poorly trained when it comes to medical issues and routinely compromises passenger health and safety. Unfortunately like we see in the VA scandal some passenger may have to die first before the public backlash becomes to great to ignore.June 9, 2014 at 11:25 AM
-------------------------
I see that West has responded on another forum that he has given the best answer he has. Ok, I can believe that but West has also been asked to push this question up the chain to get an official TSA statement.

Here on the official TSA blog that request has been met with silence. Nothing from TSA PR types or any other TSA official. Apparently a push is now on to get congress involved.

Wouldn't it be so much easier for TSA to just do the right and responsible thing and answer the question?

Anonymous said...

Still no answer on the false alarms from the naked body scanners, West Cooper and Curtis Burns?

Susan Richart said...

SkyWayManAz wrote:

"I'm not sure if this is a widespread problem or not with these specific pills."

It doesn't matter if it's widespread or not, just one instance of taking required medication from a passenger is one incident too many.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

So why is the TSA Blog Team talking about medical nitroglycerin pills on FlyerTalk but not on the official TSA Blog?

Anonymous said...

"Naked body scanner" is no longer in service aka Rapiscan. Now TSA uses something called Provision ATD scanners using millimeter radio waves and is completely non-invasive

Anonymous said...

Rules are rules. If nitroglycerin is banned in any form, so be it. The TSOs are just following the rules. Bend one rule and the whole system that keeps people safe collapses. If a person can't travel with the safety restrictions, let them stay home.

Anonymous said...

" If nitroglycerin is banned in any form, so be it."

Guess what, nitro is NOT on the TSA's list of banned items.

http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/prohibited-items#9

RB said...

Anonymous said...Rules are rules. If nitroglycerin is banned in any form, so be it. The TSOs are just following the rules. Bend one rule and the whole system that keeps people safe collapses. If a person can't travel with the safety restrictions, let them stay home.June 11, 2014 at 8:17 PM
_____________________________

Typical TSA employee response. Too ignorant to understand that medical nitroglycerin is not and cannot be made into an explosive item. Yes medical nitroglycerin shares the same name as the explosive variety but are completely different in purpose.

TSA screeners can find all the real threat items there are but as long as they do stupid things like confiscating lifesaving medicines TSA will remain the most hated part of goverment.

TSA screeners, wonder why you receive little respect from others?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said..."Naked body scanner" is no longer in service aka Rapiscan. Now TSA uses something called Provision ATD scanners using millimeter radio waves and is completely non-invasiveJune 11, 2014 at 6:08 PM


MMW Whole Body Imagers still have the ability to store and transmit the raw video image. Same MMW machines with just the addition of the ATR device.

Anonymous said...

"Now TSA uses something called Provision ATD scanners using millimeter radio waves..."

...to generate naked images of people, which are then run through the "gumby" software. Naked images are, of course, inherently invasive, as are the thousands of rub-downs resulting from the use of these worthless machines that cannot distinguish between (for instance) pleats on a pair of pants and an explosive. Of course, the naked body scanners have never found an explosive.

We still don't know how many false positives the naked body scanners produce every week, and West Cooper and Curtis Burns refuse to tell us why. Isn't that strange?

Anonymous said...

I wish to offer my congratulations and give kudos to the center checkpoint staff of SEA, morning shift, June 12th. Not only did the document checker (a new one!!!) know what a TWIC card was just by looking at it, but so did the person training her! I only saw one scowling TSO, and that was the bag scanner operator. Gotta love it when id issued by the TSA is actually recognized by the TSA... unlike ORD south domestics - just about every time i have flown through Chicago.

Anonymous said...

The ATR software still needs tweaking, as it sees an empty zippered pocket as a "target" with depth and contents.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
The ATR software still needs tweaking, as it sees an empty zippered pocket as a "target" with depth and contents.

June 12, 2014 at 10:55 AM

And TSA needs to be dumped in the bit bucket.

RB said...

Why is TSA so afraid to make a definitive public statement about lifesaving medicine?

This lack of transparency certainly tells the public what the character of TSA and its employees are.

What a distinguishing organization.

Anonymous said...

This comment section reflects the disconnect the TSA and its employees have from the flying public, and reality in general.

Blotter Bob blurts out that 18 people out of the 1,200,000 people who flew one day ( .0015% ) so proudly, then hides as West trots out useless information. Useless because no matter what the TSA SSI SOP says, no matter what West, this blog, or the TSA website says, screeners can seize health and life-saving legal medication from someone who wants to travel in the USA.

This is all followed up by TSAnonymous employees and TSApologists (usually friends and family of the employees) making false claims about naked pic scanners, fawningly praising the TSA for things they don't do (like keep anyone or anything safe), and saying the world should just bow down and accept abuse, bureaucratic nonsense and lies.

This blog is a sign of how sick this country has become.

Are you brave enough to post this comment, blotter team?

*screenshot taken*

Wintermute said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
"Naked body scanner" is no longer in service aka Rapiscan. Now TSA uses something called Provision ATD scanners using millimeter radio waves and is completely non-invasive

You are incorrect. "Naked body scanner" still scans the naked body and just uses a software layer to compose an outline. According to the RFP, they have the capability to not only store, but also transmit, the underlying image data. So even though the TSA gawking rooms are gone from airports, naked scans are still occurring.

Anonymous said...

Does any one have any better ideas. there will always be bad apples and kinks to fix in any agency. I just hope people remember that the Jobs the TSA do in all airports are from the higher ups and they are just doing what they are trained to do. Also remember that it was a private agency when 9-11 happened.

RB said...

Anonymous said...Does any one have any better ideas. there will always be bad apples and kinks to fix in any agency. I just hope people remember that the Jobs the TSA do in all airports are from the higher ups and they are just doing what they are trained to do. Also remember that it was a private agency when 9-11 happened.June 14, 2014 at 3:34 PM
************************
Bad apples? The whole of TSA is made up of bad apples.

Just following orders wasn't a defense at the Nuremburg trials nor is it a winning defense today.

On 9/11 the civilian screeners allowed the items that goverment rules allowed. The failure wasn't the screeners but government, the same government now doing the screenings directly.

Anonymous said...

9/11 would have happened is the govt was running screening areas because the murderers were not carrying anything illegal, cockpits were not locked, and passengers were taught to comply with hijackers.

The TSA keeps using the tragedy of 9/11 as an excuse to abuses the flying public and steal from US taxpayers. Don't buy their line.