Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Updated TSA Travel Tips: A frequent flyer profile, a frequent flyer number, a Known Traveler Number and TSA Pre✓®: what does it all mean?


Updated 02/03/2015 - This post has been updated to bring you the latest information and tips on TSA Pre✓®.

Review these tips if you just received your KTN or have not received TSA Pre®.


If you have a Known Traveler Number (KTN), you might want to pay attention to this blog post. Why? Your next TSA Pre✓® opportunity may be impacted by how you use this information.
 
If you are enrolled in a trusted traveler program (TSA Pre✓® application program, Global Entry, NEXUS and/or SENTRI), or have been issued a KTN (e.g., members of the military), you will receive TSA Pre✓® on a consistent basis.

However, we have learned that TSA Pre✓® travelers who receive their KTN only add it directly to their frequent flyer profile. You may think you are all set, but more may be required to be eligible for TSA Pre✓® on your next flight.
 
Your frequent flyer profile — for one of the 11 TSA Pre✓® participating airlines — makes the booking process easier, quicker and more efficient when booking on that particular airline website ONLY for future flights; your name, KTN and other personal/billing information is automatically populated when you use that site, and are logged in, for future reservations. 
 
But we want to make a few very important points about this process:

  • Entering your KTN to your frequent flyer profile will NOT automatically update previously booked reservations.
  • If you make reservations via a third-party website (not on the airlines’ website directly) and/or travel agency, your KTN may not always be shared with the airline. Also, some systems don’t allow you to enter a KTN and only have a “Redress” field. Do not enter your KTN in the redress field.
  • Even though you save your KTN in your frequent flyer profile, it will not associate your KTN with reservations automatically unless the KTN is supplied during the booking process.  Remember to always enter your KTN when booking your reservation, even when using your frequent flyer profile.
  • Lastly, if you make a change to a reservation, the airlines’ reservation system may, at times, remove your KTN.

TSA always recommends you contact your air carrier directly to add your KTN to your reservation, or use the tips below to ensure it is added correctly  
 
We recommend that when in doubt, call your air carrier — or contact them via Twitter — to verify that your Secure Flight data matches. Verify that the airline has your first/middle/last name, gender and correct date of birth exactly as you applied for your KTN. Your individual reservation — not just your frequent flyer profile — must include your KTN. Incorrect name and/or date of birth information will not clear you to receive TSA Pre✓® expedited screening on that flight. This also will happen if you incorrectly enter your KTN or enter it in the redress field. 

Participants in a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) trusted traveler program: your PASSID is your KTN and will generally start with 98. You can verify this information by logging into GOES. Choose the “Change Profile” option to verify first/middle/last name/date of birth and PASSID, which is your KTN. Your trusted traveler card will not grant you access to TSA Pre✓®; TSA Pre✓® must be printed on your boarding pass in order to receive expedited screening benefits.

Some of the TSA Pre✓® participating airlines allow you to pull up your individual reservation, and verify your KTN is included. We recommend you check, just to be sure, and it only takes a few minutes of your time:

Participating carriers

  • Air Canada: Visit http://www.aircanada.com/aco/manageMyBookings.do. Enter confirmation number/last name. Click “Update Passport Information (APIS).” Include passport information, along with KTN in the “Known Traveler Number (e.g. NEXUS PASS ID)” field. (NOTE: TSA Pre✓® is only available at U.S. airports.)
  • Alaska Airlines: Visit https://www.alaskaair.com/booking/reservation-lookup. Enter confirmation number/last name. Under “Traveler Documentation,” click “Enter Known Traveler/Redress number,” enter KTN. If your KTN has already been added, you will see the message, “Known Traveler number has already been collected for this traveler.”
  • American Airlines: Visit https://www.aa.com/reservation/findReservationAccess.do. Enter confirmation number/first name/last name. Under the “Passenger Summary” tab, click “Add/Edit Passenger Information.” Verify name and KTN in the “Known Traveler ID” field. (Passengers will not be able to edit this information online after check-in.)
  • Delta Air Lines: Visit https://www.delta.com/mytrips/findPnr.action. Enter confirmation number/first name/last name. Under the “Secure Flight Passenger Data & Contact Information” tab, verify gender/date of birth/KTN. (Passengers will not be able to edit this information online within 72-hours of departure.)
  • Hawaiian Airlines: Visit https://apps.hawaiianairlines.com/MyHawaiianMiles/MyTrips. Enter confirmation number/last name. Under the “Additional Passenger Information” tab, click “Make Changes.” Verify name/date of birth, and click “Add Known Traveler #,” enter KTN.
  • JetBlue Airways: Visit https://book.jetblue.com/B6.myb/landing.html. Enter confirmation number/last name, click “Itinerary options,” click “Add/Edit TSA Precheck,” enter KTN.
  • Southwest Airlines: Contact Southwest Airlines.
  • Sun Country Airlines: Contact Sun Country Airlines. You may add your KTN during the check-in process if not provided previously.
  • United Airlines: Visit https://www.united.com/web/en-US/apps/reservation/default.aspx. Enter confirmation number/last name, click “Edit traveler information,” enter KTN in “Known Traveler Number/Pass ID” field.
  • US Airways: Contact US Airways. You may add your KTN during the check-in process if not provided previously.
  • Virgin America: Visit https://www.virginamerica.com/manage-itinerary/. Enter confirmation number/last name. Click “Add Known Traveler #,” select traveler and add KTN.

What happens if I didn’t receive TSA Pre® on my boarding pass? What are my options? 
 
If you didn’t receive it, most likely it was due to one of the issues outlined above. Additionally, if you have flights with multiple participating carriers, you should ensure your KTN is listed with each individual carrier, as they submit this data to TSA for TSA Pre✓® verification starting 72-hours prior to departure.

If you check-in online before your flight and don’t see a TSA Pre✓® indicator on your boarding pass, contact your air carrier, or use one of the methods above. This will update your Secure Flight information right away. If everything matches, you will be able to re-print your boarding pass again, hopefully with TSA Pre✓® this time! 
 
Other tips to ensure you receive TSA Pre®    
 
Check out these tips/previous blog posts regarding KTN use:


As always, TSA continues to incorporate random and unpredictable security measures throughout the airport and no individual will be guaranteed expedited screening. 
 
Ross Feinstein, TSA Press Secretary

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108 comments:

Anonymous said...

Luckily, this hasn't happened to me yet. If I check in for a flight at the airport and get my boarding pass without "Pre-Check" on it, can I just give the ticket agent my TKN and get a boarding pass reprinted with "Pre-Check" on it?

RB said...

Serious question that I would appreciate being answered.

It has been reported that some TSA screeners are confiscating medical nitroglycerin pills.

I think any sane person knows that these pills are not and cannot be converted to an explosive state due to adulterents added to the pills not to mention the very minute amount of active ingredient.

Exactly what is TSA's policy regarding medical nitroglycerin pills?

Is TSA aware that medical nitroglycerin is also prescribed in both patches and as an ointment? Are these forms of medical nitroglycerin also confiscated by TSA?

What is the Risk Based analysis that would suggest the need to confiscate medical nitroglycerin, a non-explosive life saving medicine?

What the heck is TSA thinking?

Susan Richart said...

Hey Ross Feinstein, TSA Press Secretary, (or Bob or West) how about a statement on whether or not passengers are allowed to carry prescribed nitroglycerin pills?

It's a life and death matter and yet we have been reading that the TSA has disallowed them because they are nitroglycerin, even though there's not a tinker's chance they can explode.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

How many people have you roped into applying for TSA PreCheck?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

I have a question about PreCheck.

I have flown two round trips recently. On each outbound flight the airline gave me PreCheck but not on the return flights.

If TSA's PreCheck is truly a risk based program and I was considered a low enough risk to be given PreCheck on even one flight but not other flights then the evidence points to something other than Risk Based decisions.

I suggest that TSA is more interested in revenue generation than Risk Based screening.

Anonymous said...

The comment in the article that this can be checked for an existing reservation is not correct - at least not for American Airlines. I called them after I was not pre-checked for a flight and they said they can only check that the KTN is in my account information, not whether it is attached to a reservation. Essentially if you are pre-checked sometimes and not others then you have no way of knowing why.

Susan Richart said...

RB wrote:

"I have flown two round trips recently. On each outbound flight the airline gave me PreCheck but not on the return flights."

TSA uses the carrot and stick approach to try to get people to sign up for PreCheck.

Give 'em precheck on their outward bound leg to they can experience how great the program is but deny precheck on the homeward leg to remind passengers of how awful "normal" screening can be.

Funny thing is, I don't think it's working. If it were Bob and Mr. Feinstein would be telling us of the hundreds of thousands who have parted with $85, been subjected to being fingerprinted, interrogated and a background check in order to participate - maybe.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Couldn't you save everyone a lot of bother by making Precheck the standard screening protocol for EVERYONE, instead of the wealthy/elite/lucky?

Sharon Brown said...

I received random TSA Pre selection on my recent trip. I didn't ask for it. I didn't want it. But I was pushed on through. I wanted to stay with my family, especially as it gave me no advantage since I had to wait for them for about 20 minutes.

This random "opportunity" should be optional and easy to decline.

(It also makes me wonder whether the TSA has been digging too far into my private affairs or is risking letting a real danger onto the plane.)

Anonymous said...

i would like to know the stats for how many firearms are found on low risk precheck passengers.

Anonymous said...

My father used to carry them all the time through security checkpoints. He always had his prescriptions with him and they didn't question what it was for. I think that the airports you guys were going through need more training. They should not be taking someone's medication from them, because nitro is prescribed for heart patients that need it.

Anonymous said...

"i would like to know the stats for how many firearms are found on low risk precheck passengers."

I would like to know this, too.

Anonymous said...

Where's the link back to this article? Isn't that automatically added by the Blogger website?

http://www.bizjournals.com/bizjournals/blog/seat2B/2014/06/why-tsas-precheck-program-has-failed-to-keepits.html?page=all

Or do you not allow links to TSA blog articles to be posted?

Curious.

Jerome Solanum said...

How about we back up a bit and answer some basic questions. Like what is a "KTN"?

Anonymous said...

Known Traveler Number.
Try google next time.

Anonymous said...

I have been Pre-TSA since it started. I have travel with every major airline and always received Pre-TSA.
Today for the first time I’m traveling on Allegiant and my boarding pass does not show Pre-TSA. I contacted the airline and they told me that they do not participate in the program. So if you don’t want it don’t travel with the big boys.

Anonymous said...

My husband and I both applied for TSA PreCheck & have our KTN's on our boarding passes. My husband is cleared at CLE but has been rejected both times on the return flights from DEN, which affects me also. Why did we bother paying for the program?

Rose Moten said...

My husband and I applied for TSA pre check and both have our KTN. On a recent flight last week, my husband received the TSA pre check logo on his boarding pass for both our departure and return flights, yet I did not. The reservation was booked together. We were very dissatisfied, as we were never told that the selection is random. What's the point of one person in a family getting the logo and the other not. This makes it very inconvenience. This policy of randomly assigning pre-check status to travelers with KTN was never explained to us when we applied. We are now wondering if we wasted $160 on this process. Very dissatisfied. This policy needs to be revisited and changed.

Anonymous said...

This is so confusing. My husband and I have been in the Global Entry program since it started, but have never received expedited security clearance on leaving the country. Apparently it is random selection. Now,
the email that I received stating that I can apply for TSA Precheck is misleading because if you are already in Global Entry, and have a KTN then you don't need TSA PreCheck as well. Even if you have a KTN, there is no guarantee that you will have access to expedited security lines. This whole program needs to be upfront and less vague. I have spent a lot of time with American Airlines and TSA to get answers but no-one seems to even understand the problem. $100, fingerprints and interview. For what? I guess in our case, only re-entry to the USA was easier with the kiosks.

Anonymous said...

Flew out of Atlanta last week and the main security was expedited.... sounds the same as precheck. I just checked in for my return flight and I see the status "precheck" on my boarding pass although I never applied. I suspect Atlanta may be a test airport for expedited security for everyone.

Anonymous said...

I'm just floored that on a recent flight out of LGA, that Travelers with a foreign passport were allowed to utilize the Pre-Check lane as part of the random trail of pre-check. WTF?? It's very frustration to be a paid Global Entry / Pre-check traveller and to slowed down by random passengers being allowed in the TSA Pre-Check line. It was annoying when I was merely sponsored by my airline, but more so when I am paying for the service. I understand they want to recruit more people to pay, but people who aren't even US citizens and therefore ineligible? Really? This is security?

John Hedtke said...

I'd like to find out a little more about the interview process before I pay $85.

If the nature of the interview is asking if I'm a terrorist, I can safely say "no." If it's asking about my political views or much of anything else personal, I'm not interested in sharing these because it's not the gov't's business and it has no bearing on anything.

Can anyone tell me more about what the interview process is? Email me offlist if you prefer.

Anonymous said...

When you receive your KTN, do you receive some type of card? Or just a letter from TSA.

Anonymous said...

My wife and I both got our KTN after the background check and paying $85 and fingerprinted...then the first trip I got TSAPre and she did not. Only then was I informed tat it is STILL a random process.

All you get from TSA is a letter and a number. The Airline agent needs to make sure TSAPre is printed on the pass or the letter does you no good.

Seems like a big waste of time and money to get a KTN!

Anonymous said...

You receive a letter with your KTN. when you book with a participating airline there is a place to enter you KTN. However that still doesn't guarantee you PreCheck when you fly.

It is very frustrating to pay the fee and go through the process to enroll and still have no idea if you will get PreCheck when you check in.

This exact thing just happened to my wife. We both have KTN's. I confirmed with the airline that the KTN's were on our reservation. Upon check-in I got PreCheck, but my wife did not.

Anonymous said...

John, I submitted through the website last week and went through the interview as a walk in this last Wednesday. The website process took 15-20 minutes and was more involved than the in-person interview.

For the interview: I was in and out of the building in 30 minutes but the interview itself took less than 10 minutes. It consisted mostly of confirming my name, address and other information I had previously submitted. I was also finger printed using a scanner. The interviewer was friendly and politics/view were never brought up. Hope that helps.

Ronald G said...

Regarding Susan Richart said...
How many people have you roped into applying for TSA PreCheck?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

June 6, 2014 at 4:24 PM

Susan, I have both CLEAR and TSA Pre check and have to tell you that the TSA is much better. Not sure why you believe people are being roped into it.

Anonymous said...

As I entered the check point at PreTSA at JFK I was told there needed to be it printed in my ticket. I was told to go to customer service line for my airline. Luckily I had two hours to spare and my KTN . The CS rep issued me a new preTSA printed ticket. But said call the airline if you don't see a check off box on purchasing screen or forgot to put it in. It will be changed before your flight.

Anonymous said...

Google always works.
Or, could also try reading the first sentence of the article.

Anonymous said...

well, the brainiac that wrote the article should capitalize the K, the T, and the N for those three words in the first sentence. It would then be self explanatory what a KTN is.

Anonymous said...

I am surprised at some of comments which are there on this blog entry. If these folks had bothered to go through the FAQs of the program before applying they would have realized that you are selected for TSA recheck on a random basis. having a KTN does not guarantee pre check, but increases your chances of getting the same.

Anonymous said...

What's really annoying is not the long lines we are used to but the fact that the airlines are now allowed to provide "preferred" fliers with "preferred" access to TSA screening.

Anonymous said...

What is the most annoying is the traveler who have not even tried to read and understand the rules about being processed through security. They hold up the entire line while they find each penny in their pocket, take off 10 pieces of jewelry, unlace high top boots, and after 5 minutes of this they still set the set the buzzer off. I don't know how much clearer TSA can make the rules, some people just think the world revolves around them

Anonymous said...

Paid the $85. Got the KTN. So far (4 trips) only once have I received TSA Pre. Irked & so sorry I enrolled. ROE = nil.

Anonymous said...

This is a bogus program. I am active duty military. My job is 60% travel. I have signed up for this and have yet had the chance to bypass the regular line. Tsa person said for me to sign up which i told him i did. He stated oh wonder why you dont get selected.

Then at the airport i constantly ask the customer service rep to please print my ticket for the tsa pre screen for some reason they cannot.

How about just letting all active duty, reserves, and national guards go through the precheck. This use to be allowed at many airports.

This program is garbage.

Anonymous said...

Being a gov't employee, I got pre-check before I knew what it was. A couple months later I reserved a flight, included my KTN and didn't get it. I asked the agent why and he said it's random - still have to keep the bad guys guessing. I just rolled my eyes and went ont.

Anonymous said...

I agree with a lot of the comments that it is a waste of money. I only get selected about 50% of the time. Many times there is no line at the TSA pre and I don't get selected. I think it is just another money making scam to pay for security. Save your money.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous Military who signed up for TSA Pre you should have saved your money. Read this first...
http://www.tsa.gov/tsa-precheck/military-members

Anonymous said...

I was not randomly selected. I signed up online for precheck. Anybody can apply. I fly out of Cleveland and always get precheck, including return legs. Just add the KTN to your profile with participating airlines (all are not in the program).

Jessica Hart said...

TSA Travel Tips A frequent flyer profile a frequent flyer number a Known Traveler Number and TSA Pre what does it all mean.

Anonymous said...

TSA Pre is $85. NEXUS is $50 and seems to include TSA Pre privileges. Any reason not to go the NEXUS route?

Anonymous said...

Although I never applied for TSA Precheck, I received a Precheck boarding pass the last four times I flew. However, as soon as screeners noticed the obvious, that I use a mobility scooter, I and my husband were waved to the regular security check line. My husband does not travel with a scooter, and has never been waved out of the Precheck line unless he is travelling with me. I have no objection to a check of my scooter, but I do resent the fact that both of us were bounced from Precheck because (I assume) of a scooter check. Based on this experience, I doubt that I will apply for Precheck. It looks like TSA is not going to let me use it anyway because I need an assistive device.

Charles Beard said...

The interview process was very simple. They just verified what I includes on my preapplication online (e.g. Demographic information), fingerprinted me, and scanned my passport. It took a little less than 5 minutes.

Anonymous said...

Recently flew into MIA on American Airlines and went through customs with a boarding pass that was printed in the Dominican Republic. Boarding pass had TSA precheck on it but I was denied access to the TSA precheck line and told to go get the ticket re printed at the American Airlines desk. I just decided to go to the regular line because it wasn't that long and then got randomly chosen to get back into the TSA precheck line. Weird.

Anonymous said...

I could not find any explicit statement, but I assume retired military are included in the TSA pre-check program that applies to regular and reserve members of the military.
I have a 10-digit DOD ID number on my DD-Form 2, and will use that the next time I make airline reservations, unless I learn I am somehow "not qualified" after 29 years of service.

Anonymous said...

I am wondering what the point was of going to the trouble and expense of getting a KTN, only to find I am deselected for Precheck at the same rate as before I had a KTN. I feel misled and am extremely disappointed and frustrated.

Anonymous said...

I never applied for PreCheck, but get it about 75% or the time. If the 25-50% rate of getting precheck on a particular flight experienced by others who posted here are representative of people who paid for precheck, paying does not appear to be a good deal.

Anonymous said...

I think its very likely that the married couples who report they both have KTN's and are not both getting PreChek is pretty simple to explain. If one person books the 2 tickets using their Frequent Flyer account, the spouse will not have the ticket issued with the profile in their (separate) FF account. Married couples need to book their flights using their own accounts so that the ticket is issued.

I use a corporate travel system that doesn't support the KTN and in order to get Pre-Check, I know that I must then go into my airline's frequent flyer account and add the ticket (using the ticket locator) every time -- otherwise, the airline is not matching me.

Anonymous said...

My comments mirror numerous previous blog posts on this site.

My experience after being accepted as a Global Traveler has been - well - completely inconsistent and irritating.

The intent of becoming a 'known or trusted flyer', is being known as a trusted, screened and known individual.

I'm a former Marine, my professional life is centered around classified and secure government IT contractors and programs. To the point of being a Known Traveler, you're known and trusted, or you're not.

You have a security clearance, which is universally accepted, or you don't. You receive Social Security every month, or you don't.

I'm either a Trusted/Known Traveler, or I'm not. But I am NOT the guy who's gong to endure a "maybe you're Pre-check today" kind of guy.

Figure it out TSA. I'm in or I'm out, but tell me up front. Seinfeld's Kramer Movie-phone: just tell me the movie you're going to see.

Anonymous said...

I'm flying Spirit and they do not participate in precheck. However, the security checkpoint I am using is for multiple airlines. What "proof" can I take with me to security to show I have precheck? I have my #, but I can't believe they would take it for real.

Anonymous said...

I fly Spirit on weekly basis and I am a Global Entry traveler and not having TSA Pre is super annoying and time consuming. This whole program is so extremely bothersome with its dependence on participating airlines/airports. Obviously risk does not much have to do with this program with the stipulations that are put in.

Outbound said...

Is this PreCheck already present in other countries such as my country Indonesia?

Matthew Arnold-Lloyd said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Rakshi said...

How many people have you roped into applying for TSA PreCheck?

Bellsprout said...

As others have mentioned, the TSA Precheck and Global Entry were design to expedite the check in re-entry process for trusted travellers.

What I find strange is when foreign nationals with who are not even subscribed (went through the vetted process for the trsuted traveller program) are directed towards the TSA precheck line. This increases the traffic for people who already have the program and paid to get it.

Also with GE, even if your airline participates, it doesn't meean that your boarding pass qwill always say 'TSA pre check which is silly. It seems like the system decides randomly who get to go throug the TSA line.

My last comment is that the TSA encourages people ot apply for that program; that's all good. However, TSA needs to have the required amont of personel to handle the ever increasing number of passengers with the TSA pre cehck program or else this will end up causing more 'traffic congestion' at the pre check line. Similarly with the highway authorities now telling everyone to get EZ Pass instead of going to the booth the paying. Nowadays on some highways, it's easier to go through a paid toll (human operator) than EZ pass since everyone seems to have EZpass.

TSA, I would urge the officials to condier increasing the number of agents handling TSA pre check lines.

Happy Travel

Anonymous said...

Again. Why pay $85.00 when you are pre check on sway but not another. like now comment said, feels more like a carrot on stick method to create revenue even thought the tea is funded by traveler tax dollars. Then if i wanted to say the rest of what i wanted my comment would be censored. Wow, my grandpa is rolling in his grave to see what happened to the once most free country in the world. I dated a girl from Spain this summer and she told me she felt scared in USA with all the police and laws and rules and regulations. It is a very sad time for our country.

Anonymous said...

No freedom and liberty loving people like big brother gov't, but TSA is not that. The TSA is their to protect our traveling safety. I thank the TSA workers for what they do everytime i go through the line, they're always surprised to here it. I just received my KTN and hope it gets me in pre check consistantly if I add my KTN to each reservation, but they did say I might not always get pre check. Remember, what they do keeps us safe. (but they could lighten up a bit, be more friendly, and still do a professional job).

Anonymous said...

Hey, there's always Amtrak or Greyhound. Flying is not a right! I've never had a problem flying. Take my laptop out, my shoes off, and phone out of my pocket. Takes 2 minutes. I wish there was a "non-screening" lane and aircraft for you people that think a few minutes of screening is a waist of your time. And then we can see how many "incidents" are on those planes compared to screened planes. You people annoy me when I fly and I'm help up by the "complainers"

Anonymous said...

Detroit and other airports are misusing the Precheck process. I see TSA in Detroit on every trip controlling their line size by directing people without precheck into the precheck line when its short. These people have not been screened and should be subject to max screening not be put into the Precheck line because its easier for the TSA people.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

That is an awful lot of information that doesn't really mean anything to the average traveler....

Wouldn't it be much easier to just treat every passenger as if they were a passenger and not a threat? You know.... use the walk-through metal detector and baggage x-ray machines.... like in the days before we spent 8 billion dollars a year for security that is less effective than what we had in the good old days.

Anonymous said...

Couldn't you save everyone a lot of bother by making Precheck the standard screening protocol for EVERYONE, instead of the wealthy/elite/lucky?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Hey, there's always Amtrak or Greyhound. Flying is not a right! I've never had a problem flying. Take my laptop out, my shoes off, and phone out of my pocket. Takes 2 minutes. I wish there was a "non-screening" lane and aircraft for you people that think a few minutes of screening is a waist of your time. And then we can see how many "incidents" are on those planes compared to screened planes. You people annoy me when I fly and I'm help up by the "complainers"

February 2, 2015 at 8:17 AM
---------------------------------
flying is a right. it's been debated and confirmed in the court system. feel free to look it up. if TSA processes were transparent, and if they actually made us safer, I'd have no problem with it. however, we are wasting $8billion a year on this, and need to stop throwing away money that doesn't get us anything, and significantly hinders the exercise of a civil right.

Anonymous said...

Please explain why this TSA employee still has a job.
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20150204_TSA_jails_innocent_traveler_when_he_asks_to_file_a_complaint.html

Anonymous said...

I was asked what my travel plans were. Nothing intrusive though.

Keith said...

Absolutely love PreCheck. The only thing I don't like is that they still allow those who did not apply to go through on a random basis. These people hold up the process since they don't the procedure. Other than that, it is great!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Hey, there's always Amtrak or Greyhound. Flying is not a right!

Actually, flying is a right.

And Amtrack isn't an option because TSA is inspecting people when they arrive at their destination. (google the Savannah incident where people were inspected after they arrived at the destination).

Greyhound isn't an option because TSA is sending their viper teams to random bus stops. They are also sending teams to truck stops to inspect buses in transit in certain states.

Even the subway isn't safe from TSA intrusion any more.


Anonymous then said... " I've never had a problem flying."

Happy for you. Your lack of problems does not mean that problems don't exist. And it is rather simple of you to even make that suggestion.

Anonymous then said.... " I wish there was a "non-screening" lane and aircraft for you people that think a few minutes of screening is a waist of your time. And then we can see how many "incidents" are on those planes compared to screened planes."

I would choose that lane and that airline in a heartbeat. It would be just about the safest plane out there because it would be full of adults who understand that life comes with risks and that each of us is responsible for our own safety. There isn't a terrorist out there that could take over a plane full of adults who are ready and willing to defend themselves.

And finally.... " You people annoy me when I fly and I'm help up by the "complainers""

People like you annoy me. I can't stand people who complain about what other people do. Like your opinion of others means anything to anyone but you. You just continue to stand there and roll your eyes and huff at me while I stand up for what is right and just.

TSA Watch said...

Anonymous said...
Hey, there's always Amtrak or Greyhound. Flying is not a right! I've never had a problem flying. Take my laptop out, my shoes off, and phone out of my pocket. Takes 2 minutes. I wish there was a "non-screening" lane and aircraft for you people that think a few minutes of screening is a waist of your time. And then we can see how many "incidents" are on those planes compared to screened planes. You people annoy me when I fly and I'm help up by the "complainers"

February 2, 2015 at 8:17 AM

........................
TSA has infested the railways and bus terminals.

And yes you are helped by the "complainers"!

Anonymous said...

Clearly, many people are not reading the FAQ’s for TSA Precheck. First PreCheck and global entry are not one in the same. Global entry is designed for entry into the USA as an expedited way through customs. Has nothing to do with TSA precheck. One does not get you the other.
TSA Precheck, although it is a TSA program, it is not really administered by TSA. When someone makes a flight reservation and puts in their KTN, the airline they are using vets them through a 3rd party. After vetting, they are granted precheck status for that flight. Because they have gone through the background investigation, the vetting is less intrusive than regular passengers. The background is why there is a fee as background investigations are not free.
Not all airlines participate in the precheck program. That is why you may get it on one airline but not another. Airlines can “opt” their own frequent fliers into the program if they want. However, if one airline opts you in, it only works for that airline.
With any precheck passenger, there will ALWAYS be a random exclusion. Meaning a certain percentage of the times you fly, you will be randomly excluded from precheck and required to go through regular screening.
All of this information can be found online with just a little research.

Anonymous said...

Glad we "complainers" could "help you up," Feb 2 Anonymous.

It is the most ridiculous and straw man statement to say, "If you don't like how people are mistreated and stolen from by government employees, you can't complain and must not use the ONLY means of travel that will get you across the country or the ocean(!) in a day.

There is plenty of case law clearly stating that Americans have the right to travel by air.

If you cannot stand seeing people doing their civic duty in speaking out against governmental abuse, don't read this blog's comments.

You CHOOSE to thank screeners. You CHOOSE to comply with security theater. You appear to be okay with the waste of BILLIONS of dollars every year by the TSA.

We do not. You have the right to feel the way you do. We have the right to feel the way we do.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

"Hey, there's always Amtrak or Greyhound. Flying is not a right! "

First, to your second point, you are dead wrong. It has been established already that flying is, indeed, a right. Looks through past comments on this very blog to find what cases set that precedent.

Second, tell me exactly which bus or train I can take from Ohio to Hawaii. Also, can you guarantee that TSA won't be in the station when I go to board?

Anonymous said...

"Really? This is security?"

PreCheck is not security. It is merely a tool for shutting up frequent flyers who might otherwise complain about having to remove their shoes, having TSA hands in their pants, etc.

PreCheck enrollment does not mean the government actually trusts you. TSA wants to monitor the online activities of PreCheck enrollees, you know. How's that for trust?

Anonymous said...

"...How about just letting all active duty, reserves, and national guards go through the precheck..."

Why should your pet group be singled out for humane treatment? Why not teachers and doctors? Why not people between the ages of 65 and 69? Why not people who volunteer at the local food bank?

Regarding military exemptions, you know that people with military backgrounds have committed acts of terror, right? Timothy McVeigh, Nidal Hasan...

Anonymous said...

Well, now, I see that our anonymous friend has finally learned to use spellcheck!

Anonymous said...

"Remember, what they do keeps us safe."

Prove it.

"Flying is not a right!"

WRONG. Go read the comments on the December 26, 2014, blog post showing how WRONG you are.

Anonymous said...

"Hey, there's always Amtrak or Greyhound. Flying is not a right! "

First, to your second point, you are dead wrong. It has been established already that flying is, indeed, a right. Looks through past comments on this very blog to find what cases set that precedent.

Second, tell me exactly which bus or train I can take from Ohio to Hawaii. Also, can you guarantee that TSA won't be in the station when I go to board?

It is a right in a sense. However, to excercise that right, you have to follow rules, Much like every other right we have. Dont follow the rules, dont enjoy your rights. As for hawaii, if you choose to not follow the rules, there is the option of a charter flight...see, you have choices. If you choose not to explore other options, that is kind of on you. Safe travels.

Anonymous said...

Please explain why this TSA employee still has a job.
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20150204_TSA_jails_innocent_traveler_when_he_asks_to_file_a_complaint.html

I think this is simple. TSA does not have the power to arrest or detain anyone. They are not law enforcement. IF thi sperson was detained it would have been because of the Law Enforcment officers on the scene ( non-TSA).
So the questions of why uis misdirected. TSA did not detain this man, they cant.

Anonymous said...

Wrong again, Bold Blotter Intern - aka "Ms Two Masters".

The TSA detained Vanderklok, then called the Philadelphia police and made a false police report.

Then [NAME REDACTED] lied under oath.

(Second version with PHL TSA Supervisor's name removed so the blotter team can't use it as an excuse to delete rather than post.)

Anonymous said...

The American public is not required to blindly follow unnecessary, ineffective, wasteful rules made up by some stupid government employee without question or criticism.

It is our right and duty to question, protest, and change these kind of rules.

Laura Lynch said...

I'm really glad to see this information on a post, so I can share it with friends. My husband and I have often found that only one of us gets PreCheck on each flight we take. We've followed your instructions and hopefully that won't be a problem anymore. PreCheck is the best thing to happen to travel in a long time.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...

"It is a right in a sense. However, to excercise that right, you have to follow rules..."

OK. Show me a complete list of those rules. Show me that someone with critical thinking skills has put some thought into creating those rules. You can't, because TSA hides behind SSI in order to make things up as they go along.

Anonymous said...

And don't forget, Wintermute, how many screeners ifnore the SSI SOPs and play power games.

Just like the PHL screening supervisor that had an innocent man town in jail based upon a false police report the TSA employee made. And then the TSA employee had the audacity to lie in court, under oath.

Anonymous said...

"It is our right and duty to question, protest, and change these kind of rules."

Never going to happen. Next.

Susan Richart said...

"IF thi sperson was detained it would have been because of the Law Enforcment officers on the scene ( non-TSA).
So the questions of why uis misdirected. TSA did not detain this man, they cant. "

The TSA detains people all the time. Just ask Stacey Armato. In this case, the TSA called the Philly PD. The PD arrested Mr. Vanderklok based upon the false statement of the TSA supervisor.

And that's why the judge acquitted Mr. Vanderklok and why he has filed a civil suit agains the TSA and the Philly PD.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

"Never going to happen."

Actually, the reason we have PreCheck, for what it's worth, is because others protested, questioned and demanded change.

Protests, questions and demands from the public are also what forced the TSA to give exemptions to children under 12 and the elderly.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Stand UP said...

Hey TSAnonymous of Feb 10, 8:58 pm.

You say the rules will "never" change and then dismissively say "Next."

What are you afraid of? The rules as ctually changing?

Why is a government employee trying to discourage the American public from exercising our rights to question, protest, and change these kind of rules?

Anonymous said...

"Never going to happen. Next."

Uninformed, unimaginative, and rude.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous 1 said: "It is our right and duty to question, protest, and change these kind of rules."

Anonymous 2 replied: Never going to happen. Next.

Actually, it is because of people protesting here and in other venues that flyers are no longer being subjected to the x-ray version of the whole body scanners, children and the elderly are not being sent through the whole body scanners, the "Gumby" filters are now being used instead of having TSA employees look at whole body scanner images--and that's just changes related to the whole body scanners. TSA has a long way to go, but protest hasn't been futile.

Anonymous said...

"I have two Masters degrees" boldly said:

"...As for hawaii, if you choose to not follow the rules, there is the option of a charter flight...see, you have choices. If you choose not to explore other options, that is kind of on you..."

If you choose to imagine that everybody in the US is a potential terrorist (as TSA does), perhaps you ought to stay at home.

If you choose to accept TSA's unsupported assurances that you are "safer" because of TSA and that TSA is cost-effectively using taxpayer funds, perhaps you ought to follow some of the links that commentors on this blog have provided to sources such as the GAO report on the BDO program.

If you choose to ignore government abuses instead of challenging them, perhaps you ought to take a history class.

PTV said...

I try many time to know but never get how many people have you roped into applying for TSA PreCheck?

Lisa Rose said...

can you explain one thing "What's really annoying is not the long lines we are used to but the fact that the airlines are now allowed to provide "preferred" fliers with "preferred" access to TSA screening."

Michael Baker said...

Delta Airlines provided me with TSA Pre-check years ago. My Delta boarding pass includes the logo. Where can I find my KTN? I don't always fly Delta anymore so I would like to provide my KTN to American, United, etc.

Isoruku said...

I don't understand what this sentence in the post means: "However, we have learned that TSA Pre✓® travelers who receive their KTN only add it directly to their frequent flyer profile."

Charles Ribakoff said...

Although my Pre-Check# is in my JetBlue record, 3 of my
last 4 JB flights have not had pre-check on the boarding passes. Calls to JetBlue confirm that my PC # is in my record and was at the time the reservation was made.

JB says TSA makes the final decision of when Pre -check is granted. I do not understand why it works some times but no others.

Please explain m

Anonymous said...

I hold a curent and valid TWIC,(Transportation Worker Identity Credential), card as a condition of being a US Merchant Mariner. The TWIC card whose screening and process is nearly identical to that for the Global Entry program,(which I also hold), allows me unescorted access into the "sterile area" at seaports, and should also apply to airports.

A Known and Trusted Traveler is either known and trusted, or they are not. If a traveler holds a TWIC or Global Entry card, and if TSA would issue Pre Check cards instead of depending on the airlines to do it, then the passage through the security screening point should be streamlined, regardless of which airline the traveler is using.

The entire POINT of KTN programs should be saving resources by passing those with low probabilities of harm and allowing the TSA and DHS to focus more attention on the sub-set that may contain those that represent a higher threat risk.

TimInIowa said...

I'm thankful for the improvements to TSA's procedures over the last few years. I'm also thankful for the fine job that most TSA agents perform. In spite of all the whiners blabbing about their rights being violated and the TOTs (Totally Oblivious Travelers) who don't empty their pockets, most of the TSA agents I've encountered are cordial and professional.

A major exception is St. Thomas (STT) where the agents are rude, confrontational, and slow and good management is lacking. They have 6 scanning machines with only one operating at a time. The lines are outrageously long and slow. They have so many TSA agents they are stumbling over each other but they seem to just move around to appear like they are busy. Poor service in any location tends to give a black-eye to the entire organization. Please focus on this bad apple.

Thanks for keeping our airways safer than they were before. I for one greatly appreciate your efforts.

Anonymous said...

How do you do that?

Anonymous said...

Will someone please factually advise if it is true that you may get Pre-check on outbound but will NOT be able to obtain it on thr return flight? I understand that it in fact is random selection however, I want to know if it's true about outbound and return flights.

Eric said...

Before 2015, TSA Pre-check was a pilot program that was sponsored by the major airlines. If you were a frequent flier on one or more of the major airlines, they would enroll you in TSA Pre if you wanted to, and only on that airline would you get TSA Pre. e.g. I was a United 1K member and always got TSA Pre when I travelled with United. When I flew Delta, I never got TSA Pre. Now, in 2015, the program is administered by the TSA. It costs money to administer, and there needs to be a fee to do the background check etc. BEFORE, the airlines were paying for that. Just because you have TSA Pre, there will be random times that you will not get pre-check, and have to go in the normal lines. Also, there are random people that are selected for TSA Pre, even though they are not in the program. If you feel that you will get TSA Pre 100% of the time when you are enrolled, you will NOT get it. Please don't enroll, and keep the lines short for us that are enrolled if you feel you need to complain about that.

Greg Gallardo said...

has anyone else consistently had problems with Pre Check from JetBlue? I have consistently received PreCheck with other airlines, but consistently not with JetBlue. I have checked and re-checked my KTN, Name, and birth date with them, but still no PreCheck. Is it just me, or is it JetBlue?

Anonymous said...

This is proving to be a waste of time. I signed up, paid my fee, added it to my American Airlines profile....and haven't gotten recheck since the first two times after. American says to call TSA- there is nothing they can do. The posts here say to call the airline. So now what? Rude employee at AA refuses to help- gave me the TSA phone number 3 times. TSA says the answer is here. Aaaaaaaaargh! How about TSA send some training materials to the airlines?!?

Paul Ellenbogen said...

I also paid the $85 fee and did the interview. I get the pre-check on my flights from Miami to San Diego but not on the return flight. AA says that its a random thing and that paying the fee does not guarantee you will get the pre-check. I was getting it about 50% of the time before I paid the fee, so what's the point of paying?

Sandeep Dixit said...

Same problem here. Did you receive any resolution from TSA?

Greg Gallardo said...

The issue is likely with the airline. I first had that problem with Jet Blue, when the non-KTN members of my party did receive PreCheck but I did not. I emailed TSA and ended up talking with someone from the Operations Center who helped me to work out that there was a mis-match between Jet Blue's data and the TSA data. Though I got that specific issue resolved, I had to fix my credentials with Jet Blue again a few months later. I have since had consistent issues with Jet Blue and PreCheck but not with any other airline -- Virgin America, Delta, USAir and American have been fine. My solution to problems with Jet Blue is to avoid Jet Blue.

Sandeep Dixit said...

I've a basic question from TSA - if I'm TSA approved, should TSA pre-check get printed on my boarding pass? Or is that determined by TSA for every trip?

Anonymous said...

what is the difference between a number that starts with TT and one that starts with 98

Anonymous said...

Numbers are weighted equally. No benefit to one over the other. If you travel internationally, stay with the 98 number and DON'T renew the TSA program.

Paul Ellenbogen said...

I fly every other week between Miami and San Diego. I've paid the fee and my number is in my KTN is in the reservation. But I consistently get the precheck on the flight from Miami, but not from San Diego. Any suggestions on how to fix this?

Anonymous said...

TSA should disclose very clearly we are still randomly selected for Pre check even after going through the TSAPre program. I am very frustrated I travel frequently and thought this would mean I could bypass the normal lines. Why not be clear about what the TSA pre is and is not.