Thursday, June 26, 2014

Annual Reminder: Fireworks Don't Fly on Airplanes


Fireworks Discovered by TSA Officers
Fireworks Discovered by TSA Officers

I know my annual fireworks reminders sound a bit silly, but travelers really do continue to pack them. I guess it’s not too surprising when you think about it. Over 900 firearms (most of them loaded) have been discovered in carry-on bags so far this year. In fact, 18 firearms were discovered in just one day earlier this month.

So, just for the record:

Fireworks are prohibited in both carry-on and checked bags. This includes all varieties including but not limited to:

  • Aerial repeater fireworks
  • Aerial shell fireworks
  • Bottle rockets
  • Chasers
  • Firecrackers
  • Flying spinners
  • Fountains
  • Ground spinners
  • Missiles
  • Parachute fireworks
  • Poppers
  • Roman candles
  • Skyrockets
  • Smoke fireworks
  • Snakes
  • Snaps
  • Sparklers
  • Strobes
  • Wheels


Check out USA.gov’s Fourth of July page for all sorts of safety tips and cool information about Independence Day. And while you’re at it, check out our summer travel tips blog post.

Have a great holiday weekend and stay safe. 


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If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

41 comments:

RB said...

Ok, no fireworks.

What about medical nitroglycerin?

Anonymous said...

could someone please link my to a single news article about medical nitroglycerin being taken from someone at a check point? I am starting to feel that this is a false story that people are running with.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
could someone please link my to a single news article about medical nitroglycerin being taken from someone at a check point? I am starting to feel that this is a false story that people are running with.

June 30, 2014 at 9:56 AM
...............

This question has been answered.

Next!

Anonymous said...

RB, there are plenty of questions that you ask every week that have been answered, but you continue on and pretend that those answers don't justify your question.

NEXT!

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
RB, there are plenty of questions that you ask every week that have been answered, but you continue on and pretend that those answers don't justify your question.

NEXT!

June 30, 2014 at 10:48 AM
..................
The medical nitro pills question has not been answered though.

A supposed answer did not address nitro pills so the question remains open.

Why would TSA not desire to answer such a question? Do they have a policy or not or is it just more poorly trained TSA screeners, or poor management?

NEXT!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations.

Contact your congress person or contact the DOD. The DOD is responsible for the personnel files of its members and who has access to those files.

Susan Richart said...

" Anonymous said...

could someone please link my to a single news article about medical nitroglycerin being taken from someone at a check point? I am starting to feel that this is a false story that people are running with.

June 30, 2014 at 9:56 AM"

Are you the same anonymous person who has asked this question before?

If so, you have been given links; you apparently don't want to read those links.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

" Anonymous said...

RB, there are plenty of questions that you ask every week that have been answered, but you continue on and pretend that those answers don't justify your question.

NEXT!

June 30, 2014 at 10:48 AM"

Would you be kind enough to point us to the answers? I don't see them.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...

"RB, there are plenty of questions that you ask every week that have been answered, but you continue on and pretend that those answers don't justify your question."

Have they been answered? Sorta. In a satisfactory manner? Not even close. West, who seems to be the only person who answers anything, continuously uses double-speak to answer without really saying anything useful.

Mike Toreno said...

" Anonymous said...
RB, there are plenty of questions that you ask every week that have been answered, but you continue on and pretend that those answers don't justify your question.

NEXT!

June 30, 2014 at 10:48 AM"

Clerk West, instead of planting dishonest comments, why not do some research and tell us what happens to clerks who deliberately violate the rules on medical liquids. What happened to the clerks who held Stacey Armato captive for trying to get them to do their jobs. Were they fired? What happens to dishonest blog team members? Are they fired?

GSOLTSO said...

Mike Toreno sez - "Clerk West, instead of planting dishonest comments"

I am sorry Mike, but I have not even posted in this thread. The comment you quote is from an anonymous account, what exactly are you asking me about posting for?

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Mike Toreno sez - "Clerk West, instead of planting dishonest comments"

I am sorry Mike, but I have not even posted in this thread. The comment you quote is from an anonymous account, what exactly are you asking me about posting for?

West
TSA Blog Team

July 1, 2014 at 11:04 AM

..................
So are you or someone else at TSA going to censor my comment stating that TSA is unprofessional?

And what is the TSA policy on Medical Nitroglycerin? The TSA "Can I Bring" tool does not answer the question. It talks about large quantities of medicines, medical LGA's, and other things but completely fails to answer the simple question; Will some TSA screener confiscate my medical nitroglycerin and if it happens what recourse do I have to reverse that decision then and there.

Why is it so hard for TSA to step up, do the right thing, and answer a simple question?

Mike Toreno said...

Clerk West, that isn't what "plant" means. To plant a comment means to misrepresent its origin - to post it either directly or through a stooge, while concealing the fact that you were behind it. And can you tell us what happens to clerks who deliberately violate the rules on medical liquids? What happened to the clerks who held Stacey Armato captive for trying to get them to do their jobs. Were they fired? What happens to dishonest blog team members? Are they fired?

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "And what is the TSA policy on Medical Nitroglycerin? The TSA "Can I Bring" tool does not answer the question."

The response from the "Can I bring" tool can be found here for Nitroglycerin Pills, and here for Nitroglycerin Patches.

Mike Toreno sez - "Clerk West, that isn't what "plant" means. To plant a comment means to misrepresent its origin - to post it either directly or through a stooge, while concealing the fact that you were behind it."

Anything that I post here will be under this handle, not anonymous - and if I do happen to change account names, I will post the information here just to clarify. I have not used a "stooge" unless you count watching Moe, Larry and Curly on occasion (and sometimes Shemp, but he was not my favorite). I have planted some Basil, Peppers, Garlic and 2 types of Oregano, but not comments as you seem to believe.

West
TSA Blog Team

Wintermute said...

Blogger GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "And what is the TSA policy on Medical Nitroglycerin? The TSA "Can I Bring" tool does not answer the question."

The response from the "Can I bring" tool can be found here for Nitroglycerin Pills, and here for Nitroglycerin Patches.


These links don't actually answer the question in an honest way when it includes things like "Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "And what is the TSA policy on Medical Nitroglycerin? The TSA "Can I Bring" tool does not answer the question.

"The response from the "Can I bring" tool can be found here for Nitroglycerin Pills, and here for Nitroglycerin Patches.

 Mike Toreno sez - "Clerk West, that isn't what "plant" means. To plant a comment means to misrepresent its origin - to post it either directly or through a stooge, while concealing the fact that you were behind it."Anything that I post here will be under this handle, not anonymous - and if I do happen to change account names, I will post the information here just to clarify. I have not used a "stooge" unless you count watching Moe, Larry and Curly on occasion (and sometimes Shemp, but he was not my favorite). I have planted some Basil, Peppers, Garlic and 2 types of Oregano, but not comments as you seem to believe. 

WestTSA Blog Team
July 2, 2014 at 4:47 AM
........................

I don't know how to me more clear but the reference you keep providing does not answer the question. It never says medical nitro is permitted. It doesn't even address medical nitro.

Why is TSA incapable of a direct answer to a specific question?

West, did your handlers tell you how to not answer?

RB said...

Wintermute said...
Blogger GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "And what is the TSA policy on Medical Nitroglycerin? The TSA "Can I Bring" tool does not answer the question."

The response from the "Can I bring" tool can be found here for Nitroglycerin Pills, and here for Nitroglycerin Patches.

These links don't actually answer the question in an honest way when it includes things like "Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

July 2, 2014 at 4:54 AM
....................
The first link West provided does not answer the question at all, not in any manner, form, or action.

The second link for nitro patches clearly states that the item can be carried in both carry on and checked baggage. Yet a TSA screener can still confiscate the item if they so choose.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.

This is what the link that West posted returns.
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

My TSA

HomeHome

Search Results For:
nitroglycerin pills

Check or Carry-on

TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.

We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

You may carry non-medically necessary liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on bags only if they adhere to the 3-1-1 rule: containers must be 3.4 ounces or less; stored in a 1 quart/liter zip-top bag; 1 zip-top bag per person. Larger amounts of non-medicinal liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in checked baggage.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.

No where in this passage does it clearly state that medical nitroglycerin pills are allowed. No one is asking about "larger amounts" of medical items. Nor is anyone asking about labeling.

The TSA "May I bring" tool seems to me to be poorly constructed, poorly implemented, and poorly managed. But with TSA there is nothing new about any of that.

I challenge West to get a real answer to the question and to post it and the name and office of the person who can answer that question.

A bigger issue is what can a person do right then, right there at the check point if some TSA screener tries to confiscate a persons lifesaving medicine?

There has to be a means for the traveler to appeal that decision to someone outside of that airports TSA organization.

TSA is not only being reckless in not responding to this issue but I think they may be committing a crime by interfering with a persons medical care.

Anonymous said...

TSA does not have the authority to "confiscate" anything. If an officer ever says they are "confiscating" something, then ask for a supervisor. Is it really that simple? Why yes it is. People complain about how "misinformed" TSA officers are. Why would you walk into a checkpoint and be as misinformed as the people you claim are misinformed?

I say this tongue and cheek because 99% of the TSA workforce is perfectly fine people who are just doing their jobs. Like any workforce there are employees who are poor. This happens in a larger scale when there is a larger work force. It happens in any line of work, government or private.

I once read a news article that said a fast food worker spit in a man's burger. I don't go to every fast food worker thinking they are going to spit in my food.

I was flying back into the country on military orders and the CBP officer wasn't going to let me past their checkpoint because I didn't have a passport. I knew I didn’t need one because I was on orders. I asked to see his supervisor and the problem was resolved.

These things happen. It is life. When you have to deal with people there will be mistakes and misunderstandings. Not all people are bad people. Not all government workers are morons. People have bad days and good days. Some people are permanently in a bad mood. It happens. We all need to grow up and live our lives in a way that would make our Lord proud.

I know this post probably won’t change anyone’s minds on things, but I feel like it needed to be said. Reevaluate yourself sometimes and realize there are better ways to change the world than complain on a blog that was created just to inform the public about things found at checkpoints.

Sandra said...

"TSA does not have the authority to "confiscate" anything."

If that is so, then why are we seeing comments from TSA spokespeople using the word "confiscate?"

A TSA spokesman said it stood by its decision to confiscate the bottle, which it said could have been perceived as a threat.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/arizona-tsa-agents-confiscate-passenger-grenade-shaped-jimmy-choo-perfume-article-1.1725250

TSA spokesman James McKinney said the agency confiscates 1,800 guns a year at airports across the country.

http://qctimes.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/handgun-confiscated-at-q-c-airport/article_650ee512-4652-55a6-9339-c0cb18f2bab5.html

And for the anonymous person who says that the TSA’s job is not to find terrorist, here’s David Castelveter stating that is exactly what they are looking for:

“We don't analyze the behavioral traits of people who carry weapons. We're looking for terrorists," the TSA spokesperson said.

http://rt.com/usa/tsa-us-airports-guns-596/

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous wrote:

"...there are better ways to change the world than complain on a blog that was created just to inform the public about things found at checkpoints."

That's nice, except here's what the TSA says about this blog:

"The purpose of this blog is to communicate with the public about all things TSA related."

So I guess you are wrong.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Russ Farble said...

West, even if you don't post anonymously, posing as a flyer, it is very apparent that other TSA employees do. The comments above on this post show a TSA employee or apologist (friend?) (family member?) is trying to dispel the medical nitro question. He indicates previous reading of medical nitro comments, which included links, as well as previous interactions with RB and Susan.

Beyond insulting other commenters, the unprofessional and unethical behavior of this TSA employee should be called out and dealt with by his supervisor.

The Blotter Team can see where people are posting from, and if it's a tsa.gov IP address, anonymous, and a "plant", it should not be allowed. Is there a social media policy at TSA? Every govt agency I've seen has one.

And to all TSAnonymous posters, clearly state you are an employee and get a single, reusable ID and use it every time you comment.

You want the flying public to be nice to you while we're being assaulted and abused? Start by being trustworthy in your comments on this taxpayer paid government website.

*screen shot*

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Contact your congress person or contact the DOD. The DOD is responsible for the personnel files of its members and who has access to those files.
---------------------------------
DoD has retirees in their database. they are issued DoD ID numbers by DoD. however, it is TSA's decision to not use them, not DoD's - I am just looking for TSA's reasoning in doing so. it appears to be completely unrelated to their claimed (but disproven daily) use of risk metrics to influence screening.

Anonymous said...

"DoD has retirees in their database. they are issued DoD ID numbers by DoD. however, it is TSA's decision to not use them, not DoD's - I am just looking for TSA's reasoning in doing so. it appears to be completely unrelated to their claimed (but disproven daily) use of risk metrics to influence screening."

Where is the proof to back up your claim that TSA has access to the files of retired members?

Anonymous said...

Sandra said...
"TSA does not have the authority to "confiscate" anything."

If that is so, then why are we seeing comments from TSA spokespeople using the word "confiscate?"

A TSA spokesman said it stood by its decision to confiscate the bottle, which it said could have been perceived as a threat.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/arizona-tsa-agents-confiscate-passenger-grenade-shaped-jimmy-choo-perfume-article-1.1725250
--------------
The article only paraphrases what the "spokesperson" says. It is not a direct quote. That is the fault of the writer.
--------------------------------
TSA spokesman James McKinney said the agency confiscates 1,800 guns a year at airports across the country.

http://qctimes.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/handgun-confiscated-at-q-c-airport/article_650ee512-4652-55a6-9339-c0cb18f2bab5.html
-----------------------------

Once again, not a direct quote.

If you want to take one group to task, TSA, then you need to hold the same standards to those you are getting your information from. These news outlets are not using direct quotes from these people, therefore they are probably changing what they are saying to make it more understandable to the everyday reader. Having it say "TSA CONFISCATED XYZ" is a better read.

Susan Richart said...

Unfortunately, the link is no longer available, but here's a quote by a TSA spokesperson:

"'All have been confiscated from travelers screened at TSA checkpoints,' Lisa Farbstein, TSA spokeswoman at the airport, said Thursday afternoon."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Sandra said...
[[TSA spokesman James McKinney said the agency confiscates 1,800 guns a year at airports across the country.]]

If you read the article Sandra and know anything about guns you will note that the author made several errors in his/her reporting. Walther does not make a “PK” pistol, they make PPK, or PPKS, or even a PK380, but not a “PK”. You are welcome to look it up. If the author/reporter made such a mistake then is it not reasonable that they made other mistakes as well? As is the quote from Mr. McKinney? Think about it.

Anonymous said...

Susan Richart said...
Unfortunately, the link is no longer available, but here's a quote by a TSA spokesperson:

"'All have been confiscated from travelers screened at TSA checkpoints,' Lisa Farbstein, TSA spokeswoman at the airport, said Thursday afternoon."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement



July 8, 2014 at 6:54 AM
______________________

Susan, a "quote" without any source is not a true quote. Also, the statement does not say WHO "confiscated" the items. A Local L.E.O could have confiscated it.

Sandra said...

An anonymous person wrote:

"If you read the article Sandra and know anything about guns you will note that the author made several errors in his/her reporting. Walther does not make a “PK” pistol, they make PPK, or PPKS, or even a PK380, but not a “PK”. You are welcome to look it up. If the author/reporter made such a mistake then is it not reasonable that they made other mistakes as well? As is the quote from Mr. McKinney? Think about it."

That's really grasping at straws to try to support your beloved TSA. Try another argument.

/screen shot

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous wrote:

"Susan, a "quote" without any source is not a true quote. Also, the statement does not say WHO "confiscated" the items. A Local L.E.O could have confiscated it."

In January of this year, the TSA did a media blitz regarding the number of guns found at checkpoints. (The did the same type of blitz in 2013 also.) The press releases sent to hundreds of media outlets by the TSA all across the county all used the word "confiscate."

Do you think that if the TSA did not confiscate items, they would allow the word to be used in their press releases?

Now I am certain that you are going to try to tell us that it wasn't the TSA that used the word "confiscate" but rather that all those media outlets chose to use the word in their spots. However, you know that wouldn't be true.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

P.S. Did you not read my statement that the link to the quote from Farbstein was no longer available?

Anonymous said...

Susan,

I did read that you mentioned that the link was no longer available. That is why I said it was not a true quote. I think we are arguing semantics here, because it is 100% true that guns found at the checkpoint are confiscated. They just aren’t confiscated by TSA. They are confiscated by local law enforcement. Same goes for anything that is confiscated at the checkpoint. It is confiscated by local law enforcement because TSA does NOT have the authority to confiscate anything.

Russ Farble said...

If you don't believe Lisa Farbstein or Jim McKinney used the word "confiscate," please go over to Twitter and ask them.

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous TSA screener, you very conveniently avoided my argument about the word "confiscate" in the TSA press releases. Why is that?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Mike(anonymous) said...

Susan Richart said...
Anonymous TSA screener, you very conveniently avoided my argument about the word "confiscate" in the TSA press releases. Why is that?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

July 10, 2014 at 6:52 AM
________________________

I don't know if you are talking to me, but I did respond. You can call me Mike and I am not a TSA screener. I am just a person who knows what I am talking about because I do research instead of getting overly upset about trivial things

Anonymous said...

Baby food, breast milk, shampoo, water, peanut butter, perfume, etc. all are confiscated from flyers under duress. Wait til the TSA, not just their buddy agencies overseas, start seizing phones. Flyers are no longer "allowed" to leave the screening area to put their private property in their car, or check/mail it.

Have your bosses told you that yet, TSAnonymous?

Russ Farble said...

Hey Mike(anonymous),

After insulting Susan, did you do your research and find the TSA spokespeople have admitted that the TSA confiscates private property?

It's simple and it's their own quoted words.

Sad that an American citizen thinks govt seizure of private property is "trivial." Since TSA started, it has confiscated billions of dollars of private property that were never a threat to aviation safety. These items were either sold by the states in their surplus stores, thrown into landfills, or taken by screeners (with or without permission from their managers).

Mike said...

Russ,

Show me proof that those are EXACT quotes and not taken out of context. I am not insult anyone. I am being direct and trying to open people's eyes that as easily "brain washed" someone can become to the governemt they can easily become to oposition. People need to make up their own minds, do actual research and be reasonable and utilize common sense. Just because you don't understand something dosen't make it wrong or evil, you just don't understand it and that is OK. Try to find the reason behind things and dig deeper. Don't just follow blindly and get angry at things. It is all about perspective.

Anonymous said...

"I don't know if you are talking to me, but I did respond. You can call me Mike and I am not a TSA screener. I am just a person who knows what I am talking about because I do research instead of getting overly upset about trivial things"

You did NOT address my comment about TSA press releases using the word confiscate.

Please do so.

Susan Richart said...

"I don't know if you are talking to me, but I did respond. You can call me Mike and I am not a TSA screener. I am just a person who knows what I am talking about because I do research instead of getting overly upset about trivial things."

You did NOT address the subject of TSA press releases using the word confiscate.

Please do so.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Mike said...

Susan Richart said...
"I don't know if you are talking to me, but I did respond. You can call me Mike and I am not a TSA screener. I am just a person who knows what I am talking about because I do research instead of getting overly upset about trivial things."

You did NOT address the subject of TSA press releases using the word confiscate.

Please do so.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

July 15, 2014 at 7:16 AM
_________

I DID address that subject:
_________
Anonymous said...
Susan,

I did read that you mentioned that the link was no longer available. That is why I said it was not a true quote. I think we are arguing semantics here, because it is 100% true that guns found at the checkpoint are confiscated. They just aren’t confiscated by TSA. They are confiscated by local law enforcement. Same goes for anything that is confiscated at the checkpoint. It is confiscated by local law enforcement because TSA does NOT have the authority to confiscate anything.


July 9, 2014 at 1:38 PM
_________________
Also
______________

Once again, not a direct quote.

If you want to take one group to task, TSA, then you need to hold the same standards to those you are getting your information from. These news outlets are not using direct quotes from these people, therefore they are probably changing what they are saying to make it more understandable to the everyday reader. Having it say "TSA CONFISCATED XYZ" is a better read.

July 7, 2014 at 1:18 PM
__________________________

Is there any more clarity I need to go into this?

Russ Farble said...

Hey Mike,

I have been researching what the TSA has done, and not done, for years now.

If you believe Lisa, Jim, Ross, or any of the TSA spokespeople have been misquoted by reporters over the years, please provide proof or statements by them with this assertion.

At this point, you are saying all of the reporters who included TSA employees saying "confiscated items" must have intentionally not written the exact words by these TSA employees, despite putting the words in quote, which indicates exact wording.

Your assumptions about critics of the TSA, that we are uninformed or just angry, are wrong. We have taken a lot of time and effort to comb through many government documents. We have read the drivel called the "TSA Blog" for years. We have read dozens of news articles, whether they were for or against the latest TSA press release.

Do I believe every single negative claim against the TSA? Obviously not.

Do I believe every single positive claim for the TSA?
Obviously not.

I supported the TSA's failed attempt to get rid of the small knife ban.

I have not railed against the TSA for being jerks when it was the CBP acting that way.

I spoke out against physical violence towards screeners when that one screener was killed late last year.

Make all the fake accusations you want to support your pro-TSA view, but you are wrong. The world is a lot more complicated when you realize that some nice people you know who work for the TSA work for an agency that does very bad things.