Friday, May 30, 2014

TSA Week in Review – Grenade Discovered in Carry-on Bag at LAX



Grenade (LAX)
Grenade (LAX)
Grenade at LAX - A Mk 2 hand grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Los Angeles (LAX) International Airport. The Terminal 1 checkpoint was closed while the Explosive Ordnance Disposal team transported the grenade to an offsite location to be disrupted. Five flights were delayed 2 hours, 19 minutes, affecting 800 passengers. The individual was arrested and is facing felony charges in Los Angeles County.

Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert hand grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must resolve the alarm to determine the level of threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.

  • An inert grenade was detected in a checked bag at Tucson (TUS). 
Firearm and Ammunition Discovered in Carry-on Bag at Bismarck (BIS)
Firearm and Ammunition Discovered in Carry-on Bag at Bismarck (BIS)

46 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 46 firearms, 41 were loaded and 17 had rounds chambered. See a complete list and more photos at the bottom of this post.

Credit Card Knife (MOB), Stun Phone (PVD), Throwing Knife (SMF)
Credit Card Knife (MOB), Stun Phone (PVD), Throwing Knife (SMF)
Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure prohibited items are not inside. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 

  • 52 credit card knives were discovered this week at checkpoints. Thirteen were discovered at Minneapolis (MSP), five at Tampa (TPA), four at St. Louis (STL), four at San Francisco (SFO), four at Nashville (BNA), four at Kansas City (MCI), three at Duluth (DLH), two at Colorado Springs (COS), and the remainder were discovered at Bismarck (BIS), Cincinnati (CVG), Fort Lauderdale (FLL), Joplin (JLN), Long Beach (LGB), Manchester (MHT), Minot (MOT), Mobile (MOB), Montgomery (MGM), Newark (EWR), Orange County (SNA), Rochester (RST), and St. Cloud (STC). Check out this blog post for more information on credit card knives.
  • A small knife was sewn inside the lining of a traveler’s suit jacket at Milwaukee (MKE).
  • A 7-inch double edge throwing knife was detected in the lining of a carry-on bag at Sacramento (SMF).
  • A stun gun disguised as a smart phone was discovered at Providence (PVD).

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and a lot of sharp pointy things…
 
Cleaver (STL), Sparklers (PIT), Throwing Star (ANC)
Cleaver (STL), Sparklers (PIT), Throwing Star (ANC)

Stun Guns20 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation: Four were discovered at Denver (DEN), two at Dallas Love (DAL), two at Phoenix (PHX), and the remainder were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), Baltimore (BWI), Burbank (BUR), Columbus (CMH), Honolulu (HNL), Kansas City (MCI), Minneapolis (MSP), Providence (PVD), San Francisco (SFO), and Spokane (GEG). 

Firearms Discovered This Week in Carry-On Bags 
Firearms Discovered at (Clockwise) - SDF, BZN, GSO, MCI, MEM, SDF, SEO, ILM, PHX

Firearms Discovered at (L-R) - ATL, MCO, OMA, SDF
Firearms Discovered at (L-R) - ATL, MCO, OMA, SDF
46 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 46 firearms, 41 were loaded and 17 had rounds chambered.
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear, or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500.00. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

62 comments:

Robert said...

OK while I'd rather we scale back to 70's style non-checks and just rely on profiling and observation I'd love to hear what the usual grumblers say after the TSA found a LIVE HAND GRENADE in carry on luggage.

RB said...

Does it really take almost 2 1/2 hours for EOD to arrive and remove an item from a checkpoint? Especially at a large airport such as LAX?

Anonymous said...

RB said...
Does it really take almost 2 1/2 hours for EOD to arrive and remove an item from a checkpoint? Especially at a large airport such as LAX?

i doubt that tsa has an answer for this. tsa's mission is to stop explosives from getting on a plane and thats what they did. if this was truly a live device then eod should take as long as theny need to protect the lives and property of the surrounding area. if they were to rush and the gernade was to explode i would imagine the you would be all over them for not taking the required precautions. yet another no win situation.

Anonymous said...

how many of these items were found on "low risk" precheck passengers?

Susan Richart said...

Robert wrote:

"OK while I'd rather we scale back to 70's style non-checks and just rely on profiling and observation I'd love to hear what the usual grumblers say after the TSA found a LIVE HAND GRENADE in carry on luggage."

They accomplished their job, in this case, to find weapons, explosives and incendiaries.

Does your employer crow on a blog each time you or a fellow employee does his or her job? I didn't think so.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Marvin said...

Thank Goodness for the job well done..

My Opinion said...

Thank Goodness for the job well done by the TSA..

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "Does it really take almost 2 1/2 hours for EOD to arrive and remove an item from a checkpoint? Especially at a large airport such as LAX?"

In some cases yes. Many EOD teams are not a static team, they are made up of Officers that perform other duties and have to report in when a call comes in. I do not know the standard response time for LAPD, but local EOD here in Greensboro have a 1 1/2 hour spin up time, followed by travel time to the location - with 30 minutes built into the travel time in case members are unable to leave a previous situation they are involved in. I am fairly certain that the EOD department in LAPD are operating with a similar program with minor variances in the time schedule.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

How do you "disrupt" a grenade?

@SkyWayManAz said...



Robert said ..."I'd love to hear what the usual grumblers say after the TSA found a LIVE HAND GRENADE in carry on luggage."

I'd rather see us go back to 1970's style screening too. An X-Ray machine from that time and one from today will both outline a grenade in a bag on the screen. It wasn't permitted back then and it isn't permitted now either. The difference now though is the screener may be more preoccupied looking for a water bottle or toothpaste than a weapon. Realisitcally they're just infinitely more likely to find those and give the illusion they're keeping us safe. Btw PreCheck members still get screening that should have spotted this. If they were in that program they need to be expelled. If they weren't they should be ineligible now per rules West recently posted a link to.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...RB sez - "Does it really take almost 2 1/2 hours for EOD to arrive and remove an item from a checkpoint? Especially at a large airport such as LAX?"
_________
In some cases yes. Many EOD teams are not a static team, they are made up of Officers that perform other duties and have to report in when a call comes in. I do not know the standard response time for LAPD, but local EOD here in Greensboro have a 1 1/2 hour spin up time, followed by travel time to the location - with 30 minutes built into the travel time in case members are unable to leave a previous situation they are involved in. I am fairly certain that the EOD department in LAPD are operating with a similar program with minor variances in the time schedule. WestTSA Blog TeamMay 31, 2014 at 7:49 AM
___________
That seems an excessively long time especially at a large airport.

If this had been a timed device set to detonate shortly after a flight departed then the device could likely detonate right at the checkpoint given this slow EOD response time.

RB said...

 Robert said...OK while I'd rather we scale back to 70's style non-checks and just rely on profiling and observation I'd love to hear what the usual grumblers say after the TSA found a LIVE HAND GRENADE in carry on luggage.May 31, 2014 at 1:18 AM
_________________________________
I suggest pre 9/11 screening would have had the same results. Carry on baggage xray would have discovered the item just like it did today.

It wasn't a screening failure that resulted in 9/11 but failure of government that allowed the threat items used by the 9/11 terrorist, the same government now doing the screening.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "How do you "disrupt" a grenade?"

Based on a discussion with some of our TSSEs (EOD specialists), there are several different ways to disrupt a grenade, and several ways to render them safe.

RB sez - "That seems an excessively long time especially at a large airport."

The simple fact is that most Civilian EOD teams nationwide are collateral positions not primary positions. Some of the larger metro areas may have a static team, but most locations are like our local one. The team is made up of Officers that primarily work as beat cops, detectives, trainers, even admin positions, and only function as EOD team members during training or a live call out scenario. As large as LA metro area is, and the maddening traffic patterns there (at least for those unaccustomed to it), an hour is a pretty good response time. You have to figure in that the minimum team allotment has to be recalled from wherever they are. Then the equipment check has to take place (I know this stuff is staged in readiness, but there are always a handful of things that have to be checked prior to rollout) and a brief to give in order to make certain the team is up to speed on what they are rolling into. So, an hour to an hour and a half is not that long of a time considering all the moving parts in play. We are also operating on little information about the image being seen, how the grenade was presented, it could have been much more complex than a bag with just a grenade in it. The more clutter around the item in the bag, the longer it takes to sort out what you are looking at. A 2 hour delay for a live explosive device is a small slice of the day in order to make certain that the EOD guys get it right, because grenades are not something to sneeze at, they are destructive little chunks!

West
TSA Blog Team

Chris Boyce said...

Explain how you believe you have the authority to detain people in an entire airport terminal against their will? I'd like you to cite the legal authority.

http://tinyurl.com/pjns3pn

Anonymous said...

I never saw any statement that said the grenade was live.

Anonymous said...

How thoughtful to conceal the perps identity.

RB said...

 Anonymous said...How do you "disrupt" a grenade?May 31, 2014 at 8:01 AM
_________________
With a Romulan disruptor.

WooferDawg said...

GSOLTSO said at the end:
"That seems an excessively long time especially at a large airport."
"If this had been a timed device set to detonate shortly after a flight departed then the device could likely detonate right at the checkpoint given this slow EOD response time."

May 31, 2014 at 9:37 AM

BC:
Are you SERIOUS?! Why on earth would you say something like this in the first place. The idea is to stop these things from flying and prevent the devastation in air. timed or not... frankly, I'd rather it be found anywhere on the ground. Be it in the line or better... somewhere else removed from as many people as possible and cause less damage than bringing down something loaded with people. Why would you say something like that, as it came out like... no matter what TSA does to protect, this situation still fails. Bottom line, it was caught and at least removed from the checkpoint area. Excessive or not, it's better than the potential result if it flew.

WooferDawg said...

I'll always give the TSA and EOD teams a thumbs up and my personal thanks for the jobs they do and crap they face on a daily basis.
The comment reading
"That seems an excessively long time especially at a large airport." then "If this had been a timed device set to detonate shortly after a flight departed then the device could likely detonate right at the checkpoint given this slow EOD response time." reads as if they aren't. I ask, why on earth would someone say this considering the potential results. Once found, I'm certain the owner and device would be removed from as many people as possible, hopefully before anything like that occurs. The way it reads is just remarkably juvenile and without thought behind it.
Again... my thanks goes to the men and woman who do what they do to protect us. If I'm late, then so be it, I'm still going to get wherever it is.

Anonymous said...

I still can't believe they don't find any in Chicago! The highest crime place in the nation...never see any reported there! Who is checking Chicago airports?

Roshan said...

I am surprised that people still continue to take these prohibited items when it is very clear to them that such items or their look alikes are prohibited and may entertain a hefty fine or imprisonment or both.Wonder if there is any investigation done to check the history of such perpetrators and whether they are involved in any anti-social or ant-national activities

GSOLTSO said...

wooferdawg sez - "Are you SERIOUS?! Why on earth would you say something like this in the first place"

After listing this quote from one of my previous posts: GSOLTSO said at the end...

That was actually me quoting someone elses comment - not a comment that I made.

RB sez - "With a Romulan disruptor."

Not without a time machine, humans do not interact with the Romulans until 2152. Even after we interact with them, we have a war and a contentious relationship after. (at least, that is based upon the Star Trek lore, which is somewhat suspect as a future roadmap)

West
TSA Blog Team

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "I never saw any statement that said the grenade was live."

The grenade was live.

It was deemed live and removed to another location to be disrupted/rendered safe.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

WooferDawg said

...GSOLTSO said at the end:"That seems an excessively long time especially at a large airport." "If this had been a timed device set to detonate shortly after a flight departed then the device could likely detonate right at the checkpoint given this slow EOD response time."May 31, 2014 at 9:37 AMBC:

Are you SERIOUS?! Why on earth would you say something like this in the first place. The idea is to stop these things from flying and prevent the devastation in air. timed or not... frankly, I'd rather it be found anywhere on the ground. Be it in the line or better... somewhere else removed from as many people as possible and cause less damage than bringing down something loaded with people. Why would you say something like that, as it came out like... no matter what TSA does to protect, this situation still fails. Bottom line, it was caught and at least removed from the checkpoint area. Excessive or not, it's better than the potential result if it flew.May 31, 2014 at 6:59 PM
..............

That was my remark not West's.

The point which you fully missed is with this slow response a timed device found at a TSA checkpoint could place more people at risk than the number of people aboard a typical airliner.

We all know that current TSA procedures result in significant crowds at TSA checkpoints.

If interdiction typically takes two plus hours then the interdiction process is faulty. A means to place the suspect item in safe container and removed from the checkpoint would be prudent.

A multi hour delay of several flights can have a negative cascade effect throughout the commercial air system. Efforts to minimize such delays is a worthwhile endeavor.

CliffOnTheRoad said...

In the News on May 31 for the WWII grenade at LAX, the charges will be dropped.

The mans father (RIP), a retired Navy captain, used it as a paperweight. The story implies it was inert (empty)

Anonymous said...

Yellow=training grenade=INERT. It's a paperweight.

WooferDawg said...

I hadn't missed the point at all, but also had pointed out in how it was worded and thereby taken. My apologies for the way my respknse came out. Yes, I would say a couple hours for ANYONE to arrive to touch the thing is a problem. But, I realize that that's not a consistent timing for all and their response locations either. There are just too many variables in the first place as I saw the issue, for the general statement made and sure it's something constantly being addressed and response honed. Primarily, having something in place to remove the item to lessen the initial threat to all standing there in the area seems like it is THE first step and already in effect. That is common sense, as I and ithers may se it. BUT... I may be wrong, but still place my trust in a system that's continually evolving, because it must. That's all that was intended and tried to keep the response short.

Susan Richart said...

RB wrote:

"If interdiction typically takes two plus hours then the interdiction process is faulty."

I wonder if West violated the TSA's infamous SSI policy by sharing this information.

Surely now a potential terrorist knows how much time he has to cause chaos.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

RB said...

WooferDawg said...
I hadn't missed the point at all, but also had pointed out in how it was worded and thereby taken. My apologies for the way my respknse came out. Yes, I would say a couple hours for ANYONE to arrive to touch the thing is a problem. But, I realize that that's not a consistent timing for all and their response locations either. There are just too many variables in the first place as I saw the issue, for the general statement made and sure it's something constantly being addressed and response honed. Primarily, having something in place to remove the item to lessen the initial threat to all standing there in the area seems like it is THE first step and already in effect. That is common sense, as I and ithers may se it. BUT... I may be wrong, but still place my trust in a system that's continually evolving, because it must. That's all that was intended and tried to keep the response short.

June 2, 2014 at 4:53 AM
..........................
I don't see how anyone can place much trust in TSA since what they are doing is not security.

Allowing airport workers to bypass security by using employee access doors with no full time security is laughable if security is the objective. That is no different than locking a front door while leaving all the other doors standing open. Then we have the ongoing issues of TSA and airport employees involved in all manner of wrongdoing. Finally the policies and procedures TSA has in place show no signs of having a real threat analysis conducted. Case in point allowing some people picked randomly access to Pre Check. We already know from GAO reports that TSA BDO's have no better record than an individual just guessing so demonstrate the threat analysis in this case.

As far as a suspected explosive item at a checkpoint I do think there needs to be a portable containment system readily available to screeners at the checkpoint. Sure there is some risk to move the item and place it in containment but as TSA has told us many, many times they are on the "front lines of the war on terror" so I have no problem with them dealing with such risks.

If it takes two plus hours for EOD to arrive on station at one of our largest airports then what is going to happen at some little airport in flyover country?

I'll say it again, the process is broken and TSA is responsible for the process.

RB said...

Susan Richart said...
RB wrote:

"If interdiction typically takes two plus hours then the interdiction process is faulty."

I wonder if West violated the TSA's infamous SSI policy by sharing this information.

Surely now a potential terrorist knows how much time he has to cause chaos.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

June 2, 2014 at 6:14 AM
.......................
The time to respond was reported in the media so West didn't put anything out that wasn't already public knowledge.

Anonymous said...

RTFM! The flight delay time has nothing to do with the LAPD EOD response time.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Congratulations on finding and stopping the Hand Grenade from boarding a plane!

I do, however, have to ask two questions:

First, the person arrested, where they a terrorist? I mean are they being charged with terrorism, or just illegal possession of a prohibited item?


And, Second, was it found in a bag? With the x-ray machine? Wouldn't it have been found if we were using pre-9/11 style screening?

The first question I realize you won't answer because of pending legal stuff.

The second question, however, is important. Why can't the TSA follow the same model as the FAA and simply provide the guidelines that the private companies have to follow. The FAA doesn't provide the mechanics, it just sets the standards for how the mechanics do what they do. The TSA should be the same way.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
RTFM! The flight delay time has nothing to do with the LAPD EOD response time.

June 2, 2014 at 12:13 PM
______________________

"The Terminal 1 checkpoint was closed while the Explosive Ordnance Disposal team transported the grenade to an offsite location to be disrupted. Five flights were delayed 2 hours, 19 minutes, affecting 800 passengers."
______________________________

TSA closed the checkpoint and it remained closed for 2 hours, 19 minutes.

What do you think caused the checkpoint to be closed for that amount of time? Everyone had to run to Starbucks or something?

Once EOD was on site and had removed the item the checkpoint could resume normal operations.

Anonymous said...

I'm surprise more weapons are not found in St. Louis. We have soooo.. many people getting shot daily.

Anonymous said...

I think the TSA is doing a great job and if the waiting times seems long, bear in mind at least you will have a safe trip.

Roy

NicNic Nico said...

The charges were dropped, right?

The grenade was inert, right?

The inert grenade was found using an xray machine scanning a carryon bag, right?

Yet people were still scanned with naked pic scanners and groped in their breasts, buttocks, and genitals.

Yet people were fenced in the TSA for over two hours and missed many flights.

I thought LAX had its own police force. No one in an airport police force the size of LAX had any explosives training? Not one person working at LAX had *any* explosives training?

Another "LOOKY WHAT WE DID" blotter post that ends up being about absolutely nothing.

Failed again, blotter team.

*screenshot*

Anonymous said...

Hey blotter team, you forgot the very, very important word "INERT" in this blotter title.

Why are you so afraid to be honest?

RB said...

 Anonymous said...I'm surprise more weapons are not found in St. Louis. We have soooo.. many people getting shot daily.June 2, 2014 at 6:58 PM
.....................

Seeing as how TSA screeners miss 70% of threat items, based on last known testing results, those weapons are just taking a flight to somewhere else.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Yellow=training grenade=INERT. It's a paperweight."

Possibly, but it had explosive material inside, thus it technically became a viable item.

Nic, Nic, Nico sez - "The grenade was inert, right?"

No.

Another Anon sez - "Hey blotter team, you forgot the very, very important word "INERT" in this blotter title."

Actually, no we didn't.

Here the individual that carried the grenade indicated that he was unaware that the item had some "oomph" left in it.

Annnnd here it is indicated that the item was still partially loaded and had the possibility of doing harm.

All information I have had to this point indicates that the item had explosive material inside of it, thus making this a "live" device.

West
TSA Blog Team

Susan Richart said...

Perhaps that grenade was not totally inert but it also certainly was not capable of exploding like a live hand grenade. TSA is, once again, making mountains out of molehills.

Your attitude in your last comment, West, demeans you.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

All information I have had to this point indicates that the item had explosive material inside of it, thus making this a "live" device. 

WestTSA Blog TeamJune 4, 2014 at 4:41 AM
--------------------------
One thing we all know is that the public won't get the straight story from TSA.

Susan Richart said...

Does the TSA routinely confiscate nitroglycerin pills that are a life and death issue for those who need them?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Serious question that I would appreciate being answered.

It has been reported that some TSA screeners are confiscating medical nitroglycerin pills.

I think any sane person knows that these pills are not and cannot be converted to an explosive state due to adulterents added to the pills not to mention the very minute amount of active ingredient.

Exactly what is TSA's policy regarding medical nitroglycerin pills?

Is TSA aware that medical nitroglycerin is also prescribed in both patches and as an ointment? Are these forms of medical nitroglycerin also confiscated by TSA?

What is the Risk Based analysis that would suggest the need to confiscate medical nitroglycerin, a non-explosive life saving medicine?

What the heck is TSA thinking?

Anonymous said...

Just because something has a bit of explosive material residue in it doesn't mean it could actually explode, and it sure doesn't make it "live," West.

It's called science. It's like the TSA freaking out over a bullet. A single bullet with absolutely no gun anywhere near it.

Wintermute said...

West said...

"All information I have had to this point indicates that the item had explosive material inside of it, thus making this a "live" device. "

You are playing word games, making your argument much weaker, plus we know that why charges were dropped? Because it was obviously not the threat you are making it out to be.

Anonymous said...

"...What the heck is TSA thinking? "

Kinda answered your own question there, didn't you?

And where ever did you get the idea the TSA thinks? Surely not from this blog.

Anonymous said...

What is a TSA screener doing with a box knife?

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/tsa-worker-accused-of-attacking-colleague-with-box/ngCbH/

"A TSA worker at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport has been suspended and charged with aggravated assault after allegedly slashing another airport worker with a box cutter during a fight over a sports bet."

screen shot

Mike Toreno said...

Clerk West, the posting does deliberately leave out facts to make the object seem more dangerous than it actually was. What concerns me is that if one "live grenade" was found, two grenades, which might have been real live grenades, got through while the TSA clerks were looking for water or arguing with passengers over whether a Washington DC driving license was a valid ID. Rather than spending your time exaggerating dangers, can you do some research and tell us what happened to the clerks who cost the taxpayers $75,000 by holding Stacey Armato captive? Were they fired? Is the government going to collect any of the $75,000 from them?

Anonymous said...

Susan Richart said...
Does the TSA routinely confiscate nitroglycerin pills that are a life and death issue for those who need them?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

June 4, 2014 at 6:04 PM


RB said...
Serious question that I would appreciate being answered.

It has been reported that some TSA screeners are confiscating medical nitroglycerin pills.

I think any sane person knows that these pills are not and cannot be converted to an explosive state due to adulterents added to the pills not to mention the very minute amount of active ingredient.

Exactly what is TSA's policy regarding medical nitroglycerin pills?

Is TSA aware that medical nitroglycerin is also prescribed in both patches and as an ointment? Are these forms of medical nitroglycerin also confiscated by TSA?

What is the Risk Based analysis that would suggest the need to confiscate medical nitroglycerin, a non-explosive life saving medicine?

What the heck is TSA thinking?


June 4, 2014 at 8:37 PM Delete

A question has been posed to TSA. How long will it take for TSA to man up and respond?

RB said...

Anonymous said...
What is a TSA screener doing with a box knife?

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/tsa-worker-accused-of-attacking-colleague-with-box/ngCbH/

"A TSA worker at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport has been suspended and charged with aggravated assault after allegedly slashing another airport worker with a box cutter during a fight over a sports bet."

screen shot

June 5, 2014 at 8:31 AM
..............................


http://ethics.od.nih.gov/topics/gambling.htm

Federal rules on gambling prohibit employees from gambling while on duty, or while on government-owned or leased property, unless necessitated by their official duties. These restrictions apply not only to Federal employees, but also to members of the public at large, contractors, vendors, and exhibitors when on GSA-controlled property. The rules are found at 5 CFR section 735.201 and 41 CFR section 102-74.395. (CFR = Code of Federal Regulations)

Violations of the regulations may be cause for disciplinary action by the employee’s agency, which may be in addition to any penalty prescribed by law.
...............................

So we have two TSA screeners involved in gambling activity while at work on the publics payroll.

We have a TSA screener to use a deadly weapon to assault another TSA screener.

We have a TSA screener reportedly in an area he was not authorized to be in which means he used his access card to improperly enter a secured area.

I'm sure there are more violations of the public's trust. Let us see what action TSA doesn't take.

Eastern Sunset said...

Hey blotter Bob, why would I want to read your lame summary post of blotter posts from three years ago, as you mention at the end of today's post? What am I going to see? That nothing has changed in three years? That the TSA still regards the flying public as the enemy? That you still can't find more than 30% of the "scary" weapons people carry into airports?

Time to stop surfing Instagram and freshen up this place.

RB said...

June 4, 20:37 PM a question was posted asking what TSA policy was regarding medical nitroglycerin pills.

Time now is June 6, 07:20 and TSA has yet to respond.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I think the TSA is doing a great job and if the waiting times seems long, bear in mind at least you will have a safe trip.

Roy
----------------------------
Roy, you aren't paying attention. you WILL NOT have a safe trip due to any action that TSA is taking. their procedures are pure theatre, and DO NOT make us safer in the air. for everything they confiscate, there are a half dozen other items that could be used to substitute for them by a well-trained operative. we are wasting billion$ every year on this feel-good do-nothing approach to security. we have already taken the effective actions: 1) aircrews and passengers now know that passive acceptance means death, and they are prepared to respond; and 2) cockpit doors are reinforced and procedures changed to prevent access by non-aircrew. TSA adds nothing, and in fact subtracts by adding useless delay and stress to the process. please, people, wake up, smell the coffee, and recognize that TSA needs to be eliminated.

BosPoker.com Situs Judi Poker Online Terbaik Terpercaya said...

OK while I'd rather we scale back to 70's style non-checks and just rely on profiling and observation I'd love to hear what the usual grumblers say after the TSA found a LIVE HAND GRENADE in carry on luggage.

Free Games said...

Thank Goodness for the job well done by the TSA..

Bitcoin Gambling said...

Carry-on bags should be forbidden, I guess it is the only long term solution.

Anuva said...

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iLoveiTunesMusic said...

Does it really take almost 2 1/2 hours for EOD to arrive and remove an item from a checkpoint? Especially at a large airport such as LAX?

Sidik said...

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Anonymous said...

I am surprised that people still continue to take these prohibited items when it is very clear to them that such items or their look alikes are prohibited and may entertain a hefty fine or imprisonment or both.Wonder if there is any investigation done to check the history of such perpetrators and whether they are involved in any anti-social or ant-national activities.

Micahel said...

The security officials have to determine new ways of idetifying such things. Things like these have become real threat to mankind this days. Good step from TSA