Tuesday, May 13, 2014

TSA Travel Tips - Travel Tips for Backpackers, Campers and Fishers



Photo Courtesy of FWP.MT.GOV
We are well into the Spring travel period and many are getting ready for some outdoor getaways. If you’re flying to your camping/hiking/fishing destination, this post is for you! 
  
Here’s a list of common camping and fishing related items that you can and can’t bring on a plane: 

Backpacks – Be sure to contact your airline in advance if you’d like to gate check your backpack or carry it on the plane. TSA does not regulate the size of carry-on baggage. If checking your backpack, it’s a good idea to ask your airline if they have a container to place your backpack in, or if you will need to place it in a durable plastic bag to keep the straps from getting caught in the conveyor belts. 

Crampons and Pick Axes – Crampons are permitted in both carry-on and checked baggage, and pick axes are only permitted in checked baggage. 

Trekking & Hiking Poles – These can only be packed in checked baggage.


Photo Courtesy AustinTexas.Gov

Animal Repellants - You can bring chemical repellants in your checked luggage if the volume is less than four ounces and less than 2% active ingredient of either CS or CN. Most bear repellants exceed these limitations. We suggest that you buy these items once you arrive at your destination and leave them behind when your trip is over.  

Insect Repellents – They are permitted in your carry-on bags and checked baggage. The liquid limits apply when carrying these in your carry-on bags.
Photo Courtesy of Bacon

Insecticides – Ant killers, cockroach killers, spider killers, etc., are prohibited from both carry-on and checked baggage.  

Camp Stoves – These can go in either your carry-on or checked bag. There can be no fuel fumes emitting from the stove. The same goes with propane stoves. Propane tanks are prohibited from both checked and carry-on bags. Empty propane or gas cylinders are allowed in checked or carry-on bags as long as our officers can see inside.

Camping Fuel, Burning Paste and Gel Fire Starter – These are prohibited from both carry-on and checked baggage. 

Flare Guns – These are allowed in your checked baggage, but they have to be stored and declared just like a firearm. The flares are a no go.  



Fishing Rods/Poles/Tackle - TSA allows fishing poles, but if you’re taking them as a carry-on, you might want to give your airline a call and see if the pole exceeds their carry-on limits. Tackle is ok as a carry-on, but be sure that you don’t have any knives or large deep sea fishing hooks. Also, tools can’t be larger than seven inches.

Dry Ice – Dry ice is permitted in both carry-on and checked baggage. Read this post for more information. 

Spear Guns - These can’t go in the cabin, but you can check them in the belly of the plane. 

Bows and Arrows - These items should be packed in checked luggage. Any sharp objects packed in checked luggage should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury.



Lighters are permitted in your carry-on. Torch lighters are still prohibited.

Safety Matches - Permitted in your carry-on luggage one pack per passenger per FAA safety regulations. Strike anywhere matches are never permitted.

Hatchets & Knives - These are permitted in your checked baggage, but not in your carry-on. 

Guns & Ammo - Allowed to be checked in the belly of the plane as long as you follow the guidelines outlined here: Traveling with Firearms and Ammunition.  

BatteriesRead this post for a detailed list of batteries that can and can’t go.


 
Medication: One of the more popular questions we get from travelers is: “Can I travel with my medication.” The answer is yes, with some qualifiers. Here are a few tips that you might find helpful. 

Hand Warmers – Read our travel tips post for more information about traveling with hand warmers.


Liquids, Gels & Aerosols: If you’re checking a bag, make things simple by packing liquids in your checked luggage. That way, you don’t have to worry about the liquids rules. If you’re concerned about them leaking, do what I do and put them in a zip-top bag. However, I know that doesn’t work for everyone if you’re only bringing a carry-on bag. If you have to take liquids in your carry-on, please continue reading… You can read here for more details: each passenger is allowed to take as many 3.4 ounce or less sized containers that will fit in one sealed clear quart-sized zip-top bag – and one bag per person.  Make sure you take the zip-top bag out of your carry-on prior to sending it through the X-ray.

Here is some information on frequently asked liquid, aerosol and gel items:

  • Deodorant: Stick deodorant is not limited to 3.4 oz. or less, but gel or spray deodorant is.
  • Powdered Toothpaste: This is fine in both checked and carry-on bags and does not apply to the 3-1-1 rules.
  • Suntan & Sun Block Lotion: Lotions – both pump and aerosol - fall under the procedures that I mentioned above. Sun block sticks do not fall under this rule.
  • Beverages: Wine, liquor, beer, and all of your favorite beverages are permitted in your checked baggage. You can also bring beverages packaged in 3.4 oz. or less bottles in your carry-on bags in the baggie.
  • Gel Inserts for shoes are now permitted.
  • Foods: Here is a list of items that should be placed in your checked bags or shipped: creamy dips and spreads (cheeses, peanut butter, dressings), jams, jellies, maple syrup, oils and vinegars, sauces and soups.
Lastly, if you have any questions that aren’t covered here, please reach out to the TSA Contact Center. The hours are Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 11 p.m., Eastern Time; weekends and federal holidays, 9 a.m. – 8 p.m., Eastern Time. The TCC can be reached at 866-289-9673. Passengers can also reach out to the TSA Contact Center with questions about TSA procedures, upcoming travel or to provide feedback or voice concerns.   

See you next Tuesday with more travel tips!   

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram! 

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team 

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

21 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why aren't flares allowed if packed properly in a locked, checked bag?

Susan Richart said...

A "fisher" is a mammal of the weasel family. (Anyone see a coincidence there?)

The correct term would be "fisherperson."

Trying to be cute is not becoming, Bob.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Why aren't flares allowed if packed properly in a locked, checked bag?"

The flares themselves are highly flammable, similar to gasoline and other flammable fuels - almost all of which are prohiited from the planes.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Anonymous said...

Just thinking about terrorist deodorant gives me the willies. Thank God the TSA is there to confiscate these dangerous substances.

Anonymous said...

You're wrong about trekking and hiking poles, Bob. Those of us who use them as mobility assistance devices are allowed to keep them and use them while traveling through security, the airport, boarding and deboarding from aircraft. I have done this numerous times without any difficulty (save for some of your "professional" TSOs getting frustrated that they occasionally get stuck in the x-ray machine) and I expect that I will be allowed to continue to carry them with me as the mobility assistance devices they are.

Anonymous said...

Why prohibit trekking poles and staffs from the cabin while permitting canes and crutches? Can you share the logic to this policy?

Anonymous said...

It looks like the links all work in this blotter post, and the information may be helpful for some infrequent flyers.

*screen shot*

RB said...

 GSOLTSO said...Anon sez - "Why aren't flares allowed if packed properly in a locked, checked bag?"The flares themselves are highly flammable, similar to gasoline and other flammable fuels - almost all of which are prohiited from the planes. WestTSA Blog TeamMay 14, 2014 at 4:46 AM
_____________________________________________
Prohibited by FAA regs, correct West?

CliffOnTheRoad said...

Better check with your airline IF you intend to bring a liquid gas stove, cause the TSA/Rob won't fix you being up the creek without a stove (or lantern.) IF an airline requires a gasoline leaf blower to be virgin and in original box (no refurbished or drained machines), they probably won't allow your stove

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "Prohibited by FAA regs, correct West?"

I am unable to uneartht the actual code or regulation that governs that (whether it is FAA or TSA directed) at this moment. I believe you are correct, but can cite nothing to support it at the moment. However, I can include this Link to the TSA prohibiting flares. I will do some research into the actual code hopefully this afternoon and I will post it if I find it.

West
TSA Blog Team

GSOLTSO said...

Susan Richert sez - "A "fisher" is a mammal of the weasel family. (Anyone see a coincidence there?)

The correct term would be "fisherperson."

Trying to be cute is not becoming, Bob."

Actually, the oldest version of the term "fisher" is "an individual that fishes". While the term is not at the forefront of the common lexicon at this moment, it is a technically correct term for this post. It is also a gender neutral term, which makes it the perfect word for this case.

West
TSA Blog Team

Susan Richart said...

Wow, West is really scraping the barrel or he needs something to do or he is posting a tit-for-tat retort to my comment to him about Lisa Marie Jelinek. I put my post up about "fisher" on 5/13 and it took him until today, 5/19, to come up with a response.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

RB, it took me all of 2 minues to find this from the FAA:

http://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/hazmat_safety/

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...Why prohibit trekking poles and staffs from the cabin while permitting canes and crutches?"

For the same reason that seven three-ounce containers of liquid is safe but one 16 ounce container is dangerous.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Why prohibit trekking poles and staffs from the cabin while permitting canes and crutches? Can you share the logic to this policy?

I think, Anonymous, it's because canes and crutches don't have pointy ends, like any trekker pole I've seen. Oh, the damage you could do with the pointy end of a trekker. Maybe someone could push it through your eye, into your brain. Would be sort of difficult to do that with a crutch or a cane.

RB said...

SSSS for Some Reason said...
"...Why prohibit trekking poles and staffs from the cabin while permitting canes and crutches?"

For the same reason that seven three-ounce containers of liquid is safe but one 16 ounce container is dangerous.

May 19, 2014 at 10:22 AM
........................
Best answer of the week.

Sadly not from TSA.

Anonymous said...

Thanks West for reply and thanks Susan R. for link to FAA.

Anonymous said...

The Anonymous terrified of trekking poles because they have a slightly pointed end must not have ridden a plane lately. They aren't big enough to swing or poke anyone with a staff or trekking pole. LOL

Plus, when was the last time anyone used a staff or trekking pole to successfully attack someone on a plane in the US? Go ahead. I'll wait.

Susan Richart said...

" Oh, the damage you could do with the pointy end of a trekker. Maybe someone could push it through your eye, into your brain."

And just think what one could do with a pen or knitting needle. Exactly the same thing and actually it would be easier than with a trekking pole.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Susan Richart said...
" Oh, the damage you could do with the pointy end of a trekker. Maybe someone could push it through your eye, into your brain."

And just think what one could do with a pen or knitting needle. Exactly the same thing and actually it would be easier than with a trekking pole.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

May 21, 2014 at 7:11 AM

Or you could just break out your allowed sharp pointed scissors.

Remove the pivot screw with your allowed screwdriver and now you have two sharp pointed knives just made for a lunging thrust.

But don't try taking 4 ounces of water because that is dangerous.

This is the quality of TSA rules. Rules that have nothing to do with actual Risk or Real security.