Friday, April 4, 2014

TSA Week in Review – 34 Firearms Discovered This Week (26 Loaded)


Loaded Gun Discovered at (CLT)
Loaded Gun Discovered at (CLT)

34 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 34 firearms, 26 were loaded and nine had rounds chambered. See a complete list and more photos at the bottom of this post.

Live Flash Bang Grenade (MEM)
Live Flash Bang Grenade (MEM)
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert hand grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the bomb squad or explosives detection professionals must come to resolve the alarm to determine they’re not a threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.

  • Two replica grenades were discovered in carry-on bags this week at Charleston (CHS), and Honolulu (HNL).
  • A live flash bang grenade was discovered in a checked bag at Memphis (MEM).
Knife Hidden in Pull Handle (LGB), Credit Card Knife (MCI)

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure prohibited items are not inside. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 

  • Five credit card knives were discovered this week. Two were discovered at Kansas City (MCI), and the remainder were discovered at Appleton (ATW), Branson (BBG) and Central Wisconsin (CWA). Check out this blog post for more information on credit card knives.
  • A pocket knife was detected concealed in the pull handle of a carry-on bag at Long Beach (LGB).
Knives Discovered at T-B / L-R: MLI, EWR, ORD, ORD

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and a lot of sharp pointy things…
Stun Guns Discovered at T-B / L-R: ATL, ATL, EUG
Stun GunsThirteen stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Three were discovered at Denver (DEN), two were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), two at Minneapolis – St. Paul (MSP), and the remainder were discovered at Akron – Canton (CAK), Dallas (DAL), Eugene (EUG), Kansas City (KCI), Omaha (OMA), and San Juan (SJU).
Airsoft Gun – An airsoft gun was discovered in carry-on baggage at Las Vegas (LAS). Airsoft guns are prohibited in carry-on bags, but allowed in checked baggage. Read this post for more information: TSA Travel Tips Tuesday: Traveling With Airsoft Guns

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

Shotgun Shells (MFE)
Airsoft Gun (LAS)















Firearms Discovered This Week in Carry-On Bags 

Guns Discovered at L-R / T-B: AUS, SAT, SBP, BDL, GTF, DAL, DAL, MIA, GSO

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear, or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500.00. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

31 comments:

RB said...

When are comments for the 4/1/14 article by TSA that once again pushed dangerous, inaccurate information for travelers with diabetes going to be posted or allowed without censorship? This is the Unites States, right?

RB said...

When are comments for the 4/1/14 article by TSA that once again pushed dangerous, inaccurate information for travelers with diabetes going to be posted or allowed without censorship? This is the Unites States, right? Where Free Speech is clearly a Right!

Anonymous said...

And yet there is no mention of a threat from "loaded" insulin pumps? I mean, they are holding liquid, right? And you need to screen them separately, right? So why not identify how many people you "had to" secondary screen because of their medical devices, because THEY are the problem, right? *shakes head*

Anonymous said...

Thanks for all hard works you do to protect our country from crazy people who not respect our rules

SB said...

Mr. Burns, I fully expect this very serious question to be ignored. But here goes anyway.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/06/us/war-pain-yields-to-new-anxiety-at-a-texas-fort.html?hp&_r=0

Why are active soldiers automatically eligible for PreCheck? Is there any data to suggest that soldiers are more trustworthy and less of a risk than any other class of citizens?

Specialist Ivan Lopez would have been granted access to PreCheck lanes. Yet he just slaughtered three people.

Of course if you view PreCheck through a political lens and not a security risk-analysis lens, it all makes sense.

Care to comment, Mr. Burns?

Anonymous said...

And there was one, very dangerous looking snow globe confiscated at LAX! Taken from two grandparents who obviously were planning something horrible! One even works for FAA, but that may have made it worse, I don't know.

Lincoln said...

Thank TAS you are doing a good job in finding these dangerous weapons for the safety of all passengers.

Keep up the good work! I commend you guys.

Bubba said...

Once again, nothing dangerous found that requires the use of a full body scanner. Why do you continue to use these expensive, invasive, slow and proven ineffective technology.

Scrap the body scanners and shoe removal - do security Pre or foreign style for all. Simple, non-invasive, fast and effective.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. I have placed this comment in every posting in this blog for the last 2 weeks without response, even as West and Bob have replied to other questions. pretty pathetic, folks.

Susan Richart said...

What about the disabled woman who was not allowed to fly because she presented an expired driver's license. Why wasn't she given the standard opportunity to prove her identity? Was it because she couldn't speak?

http://tsanewsblog.com/13355/news/tsa-again-denies-id-denies-disabled-woman/

screen shot/DHS OIG Statement

Safir said...

Another insignificant blotter. 12,000,000 people flew last week on 210,000 flights.

You found 34, and missed about 70, firearms, none of which were held by terrorists.

That means .0002% of all people who flew last week were found to be carrying a weapon. Those people more than likely were allowed to board their flight, but never fear, because those 34 people were only getting on .02% of all flights.

I truly wish I had a .0002% chance of getting in a car accident each week.

And I truly wish the TSA wouldn't constantly blotter about something so remote and insignificant as if it justified their bloated existence.

Anonymous said...

"What about the disabled woman who was not allowed to fly..."

Mistakes do happen. Even a powerful agency as TSA can make mistakes. It is rare, but it happens, but even the TSA spokesman admits the family could have handles the situation differently.

Can you be too safe? I think not.

RB said...

Lincoln said...

Thank TAS you are doing a good job in finding these dangerous weapons for the safety of all passengers.

Keep up the good work! I commend you guys.

April 5, 2014 at 8:55 PM
............................
Instead of thanking TSA why not ask what the current Red Team results are. Last time we had any TSA missed 70% of target items.

I don't call that good work.

Bubba said...

SB,

I agree with you. There is no reason soldiers should be given a lower risk status automatically. If anything, mental health issues are higher in this group.

The solution is simple: PreCheck standards for all, as is done abroad.

Nick O. said...

TSAnonymous employee said..." "What about the disabled woman who was not allowed to fly..."

Mistakes do happen. Even a powerful agency as TSA can make mistakes. It is rare, but it happens, but even the TSA spokesman admits the family could have handles the situation differently.

Can you be too safe? I think not.
April 7, 2014 at 4:10 PM"

---------

Be sure to let America know that the TSA is "powerful," because somehow the powerfulness negates the bad acts of its employees.

The rarity of which you insist that mistakes are made again is to downplay TSA employees bad acts...because the TSA is so "powerful."

How can a TSA spokesman "admit" an act by the *family* could have been different? Is the "family" the TSA? No? Then a spokesman of the transgressor cannot "admit" the victim's family could have done anything.

It's important to learn how to quote someone correctly. Here's how:

TSA spokesman said, “I think it could have been handled differently by the TSA and it probably could have been handled differently by the family, and hopefully moving forward the family won’t have this problem again, because they know about the programs that we have in place.”

He admits the *TSA* could have done things differently. Note, not "better" - "differently." Per TSA SSI policy. He actually admits *no blame* on the actions of the screener.

He then blames the victims (they weren't allowed to board, so they weren't "passengers"), per TSA SSI policy. "It isn't our fault a mute stroke victim couldn't talk nor drive any more! It isn't our fault our employees didn't follow TSA's SSI policies!"

Except it is TSA's fault. Even if a "rare bad apple" denies a mute stroke victim access to transportation she paid for, the supervisor at that screening area should have been aware of the situation and stepped in to make the screener follow TSA's SSI policy.

What did I see on Twitter the other day?

"@TSA: Do you know you can still travel if you've lost or forgotten your ID? Read more here..." *with a link to this blotter website!*

The screener who denied the women access to their flight should have done his job *better and right.* His supervisor should have done his job too.

Finally, you're assertion that you can never be too safe is ridiculous. Going to such extremes that disabled people are denied access to air travel *against TSA's SSI policy* is in any way a safety issue is a straw man argument and hyperbolic.

You may not ever feel safe enough until you are denied access to travel and healthcare, but the rest of us live in the real world. It is not ever safe, so we deal with it in a realistic manner. Not allowing an employee of an $8 billion/year govt dept to abuse passengers is a good start.

*Screenshot taken*

Postscript: Note how the TSA Tweet said "travel," not "fly."


Susan Richart said...

Anonymous said...

"What about the disabled woman who was not allowed to fly..."

Mistakes do happen. Even a powerful agency as TSA can make mistakes. It is rare, but it happens, but even the TSA spokesman admits the family could have handles the situation differently.


It's always the passenger's fault with the TSA, isn't it? The TSA never make mistakes.

The TSA has ways to allow people without ID to fly. It's done all the time.

It would seem that because the woman could not speak to answer the required questions, they determined that she could not fly. Further, they would not allow her sister to speak for her.

This is discrimination at its worst.

screen shot/DHS OIG

Anonymous said...

Safir, the statistics for getting into a car accident are probably similar. Perhaps not so remote but I think you get it.....or maybe you don't. The TSA are screening for all kinds of things only the self righteous believe it's their "right" to carry a loaded gun on a plane when the airlines, who own and operate the aircraft, forbid it.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"What about the disabled woman who was not allowed to fly..."

Mistakes do happen. Even a powerful agency as TSA can make mistakes. It is rare, but it happens, but even the TSA spokesman admits the family could have handles the situation differently.

Can you be too safe? I think not.

April 7, 2014 at 4:10 PM
---------------------------------
except that TSA does not make us one bit safer. the security theatre they use is not (as near as anyone can tell with their super secret squirrel policies) based on risk assessment or data, it has obvious holes, is known to be no more than 30% effective in even identifying their bloated list of prohibited items (most of which have no rational basis for the prohibition), and is inconsistently applied. please put down the kool-aid, and look around!!!

SSSS for Some Reason said...

OMG! Guns!

Oh.... wait.....

No terrorists.

Never mind. Cary on with what you were doing. Nothing to see here.

Safir said...

Wrong, Anonymous. There is a 25% chance a person will get into a traffic accident in a year. The chance a person will be killed in a plane crash due to terrorism is so small of a fraction as to be zero.

You may be right that some people think they have a right to carry a gun on a plane. Some people (irresponsibly) forget they have a gun in their carry on bag. Neither of those situations, nor ANY of the reasons that anyone found carrying a gun in a carry on bag have been terror related. None have been shown to be planning to attack a plane or airport. Many of the passengers are allowed to continue on their trip. Some have only violated TSA's administrative rules. Some have violated city or state laws.

None of this justifies the naked pic scanners nor molestation.

Finally, .0002% of everyone who flew last week was found with a gun. You'd have to be in a room with 1,000,000 people to have even 2 weapon-holding people in that room.

Seriously, if you were in a room with 1,000,000 people and 2 of them had a gun in their bags with no intention of using the guns to harm anyone in that room, would you be terrified????

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

"...but even the TSA spokesman admits the family could have handles the situation differently."

That sounds more to me like the TSA is BLAMING the victim on this one. Sorry.

Anonymous said...

Bubba said...
SB,

I agree with you. There is no reason soldiers should be given a lower risk status automatically. If anything, mental health issues are higher in this group.

The solution is simple: PreCheck standards for all, as is done abroad.

April 8, 2014 at 4:40 AM
---------------------------------
the only reason for isolating our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen is that they are universally admired in our society while TSA (for many, MANY very good reasons) is not. TSA is quite simply pandering with this policy. then again, since none of their policies make any sense, none are data-driven, none are transparent, and none make us safer, why worry??

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Anonymous said...

"...but even the TSA spokesman admits the family could have handles the situation differently."

That sounds more to me like the TSA is BLAMING the victim on this one. Sorry.

April 8, 2014 at 11:20 PM

Exactly what would TSA suggest that this family do?

I guess TSA could have had a laying on the hands healing. Hallelujah!

There is no valid reason this lady was not allowed through the TSA checkpoint.

I think a hard charging lawyer should be making contact with this family and earn a couple of million bucks.

Susan Richart said...

"That sounds more to me like the TSA is BLAMING the victim on this one."

The TSA ALWAYS blames the passenger; it's in their SOP; they are never wrong. Just google "TSA blames passenger"

screen shot; DHS OIG statement

@SkyWayManAz said...

I was rebooked once from one airline to another in a different terminal. I made the foolish mistake of putting my new boarding pass in the original airlines ticket jacket. The document screener refused to acknowledge me in any way telling me to go to the other airline in the other terminal. Even though I attempted to explain I had a boarding pass for the airline behind him he escalated this loudly enough the airline gate agents behind security started yelling back at him that I was probably someone they were waiting on. Only then was I able to get him to look at my boarding pass. Although he retained it in his possession as a it was an SSSS boarding pass even after letting me thru the checkpoint. The airline gate agent had to get involved with me to get it back since they denied having it, until it turned up in the screeners possession.

After reading this story about the the disabled women at LAX I now realize I was the problem. Clearly I could have handled the situation differently. Thank you TSA for clarifying this.

Anonymous said...

why no mention of the tsa supervisor in chicago that assisted a women in the subway?

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
why no mention of the tsa supervisor in chicago that assisted a women in the subway?

April 11, 2014 at 8:27 AM
.............
Because 1,000 Atta-boys are wiped out with by one Aw-Heck.

Case in point, the female stoke victim that could not speak and was refused access to her flight because of some TSA clerk who can't employ the mental power of a newborn.

You don't see TSA talking about this issue either, do you?

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Thanks for all hard works"

You are quite welcome Anon.

Anon sez - "And there was one, very dangerous looking snow globe confiscated at LAX!"

I am not certain how horrible looking it was, but if it was larger than the size of a tennis ball, it is still a prohibited item based on the published guidelines by TSA, see here.

Lincoln sez - "Keep up the good work! I commend you guys."

Thanks to you as well Lincoln.

West
TSA Blog Team

Eastern Air said...

West, you ignored a lot of comments to cherry-pick the "nice" posts.

This is not communicating. It's denying the fact that the American public has questions and wants government employees to do their job and answer them.

Not sure if the blotter team is going rogue, like so many screeners are allowed to do, or if the "ignore criticism!" order comes down from your management.

You gonna enlighten us, West?

Mike Toreno said...

Hey, West, can you let us know what happened to the clerks who falsely imprisoned Stacey Armato? Or the clerks who filed a false police report against Phil Mocek? I understand you may not know what happened, but these are things that can be found out by investigating.

You say no member of the TSA blog team has ever been fired for dishonesty, that you know of. Why? Does the TSA have rules against dishonesty? From your experience, what happens to a member of the TSA blog team who is an inveterate liar?

Wintermute said...

Blogger GSOLTSO said...

"I am not certain how horrible looking it was, but if it was larger than the size of a tennis ball, it is still a prohibited item based on the published guidelines by TSA, see here."

That's not the point, as you know full well. The point is that the "published guidelines" have absolutely zero science behind them, and even less risk assessment. As you're well aware.