Tuesday, April 22, 2014

TSA Travel Tips: TSA Pre ✓™ Lanes Open to U.S. Armed Forces as well as DoD and Coast Guard Civilians



U.S. Military LogosTSA offers expedited airport security screening, TSA Pre✓™, to all members of the U.S. military, including reservists and National Guard members, as well as DoD and Coast Guard civilians.

TSA Pre✓™ allows participants to keep their shoes, belt and light jacket on and leave laptops and 3-1-1 compliant liquids in their carry-on bags when going through airport security. 

To participate: 
  1. Locate your DoD ID number (10-digit number found on the back of your Common Access Card). If you do not have a DoD ID number listed on your CAC, you can locate it by logging into MilConnect and clicking on the “My Profile” tab. 
  2. Civilians must opt-in to the program by logging into the MilConnect, click on the “My Profile” tab and then click on the “CIV” tab. In the Personnel Status information box, click on the “TSA Pre Program” checkbox, complete other required information and scroll to the bottom of the page and click “submit”.
  3. Enter your DoD ID number into the “Known Traveler Number” field when booking leisure flight reservations or when updating your Defense Travel System profile for official travel. To ensure your future airline reservations automatically include your DoD ID number, save it in your profile.
Sailor presenting boarding pass. Click here to learn more about TSA Pre™. 

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TSA Blog Team 

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46 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why don't you people just make this the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of keeping it as a perk reserved for the wealthy elite?

RB said...

"TSA offers expedited airport security screening, TSA Pre✓™, to all members of the U.S. military, including reservists and National Guard members, as well as DoD and Coast Guard civilians."


I am a Member of the U.S. Military. I have a valid and current Military ID Card and subject to the UCMJ.

But I am not eligible for TSA Pre Check.

I am a Retired Member of the United Sates Military.

To TSA my 20 plus years of service mean nothing.

Anonymous said...

Ooh, good. Ivan Lopez and Nidal Hasan (the Fort Hood shooters) would've qualified. Because clearly they were safe and could be trusted not to shoot up a place.

Oh, wait . . . .

Susan Richart said...

Really, what good is the PreCheck program to anybody if it's only available at about 25% of the nation's airports?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Great to see some liberty back to some people at least in the airports! Way to go TSA

Anonymous said...

Why only DoD/Coast Guard civilians? Why not all Federal employees who have been issued an HSPD-12 compliant Personal Identity Verification (PIV) identification card?

Susan Richart said...

So children are no longer being patted down, eh?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZBBR9tSCPI&sns=em

I doubt the blog would publish my comments about the female screener but the comments on YouTube pretty much say it all.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

This is a great positive step forward in security protocol. Since my husband is a civilian DoD employee both he and I had background checks done prior to his hire with the DoD. We have also obtained Enhanced Driver's Licenses through our state. We had to have background checks done prior to the issuance of our enhanced driver's license. Therefore perhaps those with enhanced driver's licenses should be allowed to have expedited screening also.

Anonymous said...

Permanently & totally disabled veterans are entitled to the issue of a Department of Defense identification card (DD Form 2765) but this is not a CAC (Common Access Card) so are they entitled to use TSA Pre ✓™ Lanes? The DD Form 2765 does indicate the individual's DOD ID number. How does such an individual set up their travel information? Does such an individual need to apply for the paid TSA Pre ✓™ services? Thanks!

SB said...

Please provide the evidence that members of the military are less likely to want to attack their fellow passengers or blow up a plane than members of the public at large.

Oh, right, you can't. Because none of this nonsense is about "risk-based security". It's about appeasing certain members of the citizenry to make the TSA look less bad.

If you read the excellent book The Skies Belong to Us, you'll learn that many of those responsible for the most notorious hijackings of the '60s and '70s were disgruntled members of the military.

Anonymous said...

And twenty-year military retirees?

Anonymous said...

And 20 year military retirees?

Bubba said...

Pre standards should be the standard for everyone.

Susan Richart said...

Looks like someone has finally prevailed against the TSA in some small manner - and the TSA is going to pay for it.

Stacy Armato settled with the TSA who will pay her $75,000 and "retrain" their screeners in the handling of breast milk.

http://tinyurl.com/n3vrq6e

This is the second time in a week that I have read of the TSA being defeated by a court. Perhaps the tide is beginning to turn.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Anonymous said...

and I can confirm it does not work for retirees. I tried entering my DoD ID number, but didn't get pre[check].

Anonymous said...

It bothers me that people the DHS has labeled "potential terrorists", military veterans, would even be considered by some for less security measures.

Further, is it the Transportation Security Administration? Or the Baggage Screening Administration? Why are pre-schoolers expertly checked while teenagers get to climb into the wheel wells of jets?

GSOLTSO said...

SB sez - "If you read the excellent book The Skies Belong to Us, you'll learn that many of those responsible for the most notorious hijackings of the '60s and '70s were disgruntled members of the military."

I do not find evidence bearing that out with some fairly quick research (10 minutes). I will simply use the list at Wikipedia for a starter. Of the 53 hijackings listed in the 60s and 70s, 20 of them had a US connection, of those listed, only 3 were indentified as being done by individuals with connections to the military. Please provide some links to help me understand where you came up with "many" being disgruntled military members.

RB sez - "But I am not eligible for TSA Pre Check. I am a Retired Member of the United Sates Military."

At this time, US Military retirees are not eligible for TSA Pre based solely on that criteria. I have no information on whether that is in the works, but it is not part of the program as of now.

Anon sez - "And 20 year military retirees?"

Not as of this time, at least, not based solely on that criteria.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

"...Please provide some links to help me understand where you came up with "many" being disgruntled military members."

I am not SB, but I provided a relevant link in a previous blog comment. To recap:

"Right-wing extremists are more likely than violent Islamist extremists--or, as they are sometimes called, jihadists--to have military experience. They are also better armed, and are responsible for more incidents. The past two decades have seen multiple attacks from right-wing extremist veterans, from Wade Michael Page, who trained at Fort Bragg, to the group of former and active-duty soldiers in Georgia, who collected weapons to carry out a plan to assassinate President Obama. In 2011, Kevin Harpham, who had served in the army, placed a bomb along the route of a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade. During the 1990s, violent extremism in the militia movement and other right-wing movements relied heavily upon those who served in the military. Timothy McVeigh, the perpetrator of the most deadly terrorist attack on American soil before 9/11, was a military veteran whose libertarian views were also heavily influenced by a novel by a former American Nazi Party official. Eric Rudolph, the anti-abortion extremist who bombed the 1996 Olympics, had also enlisted in the army."
--http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2013/04/the-greater-danger-military-trained-right-wing-extremists/275277/

Don't forget about domestic terrorism.

Here is another link:

"The publicly disclosed plots and attacks by military insiders 'represent the leading edge of al Qaeda’s ongoing effort to infiltrate the U.S. military and to recruit or radicalize vulnerable servicemen to commit future acts of terror,' according to a report published Wednesday by Mr. King’s staff."
--http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/dec/7/terrorists-said-to-be-infiltrating-military/

Anonymous said...

West, why do you and your fellow bloggers refuse to answer questions about why you people don't just make this the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of keeping it as a perk reserved for the wealthy elite?

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
SB sez - "If you read the excellent book The Skies Belong to Us, you'll learn that many of those responsible for the most notorious hijackings of the '60s and '70s were disgruntled members of the military."

I do not find evidence bearing that out with some fairly quick research (10 minutes). I will simply use the list at Wikipedia for a starter. Of the 53 hijackings listed in the 60s and 70s, 20 of them had a US connection, of those listed, only 3 were indentified as being done by individuals with connections to the military. Please provide some links to help me understand where you came up with "many" being disgruntled military members.

RB sez - "But I am not eligible for TSA Pre Check. I am a Retired Member of the United Sates Military."

At this time, US Military retirees are not eligible for TSA Pre based solely on that criteria. I have no information on whether that is in the works, but it is not part of the program as of now.

Anon sez - "And 20 year military retirees?"

Not as of this time, at least, not based solely on that criteria.

West
TSA Blog Team

April 23, 2014 at 10:54 AM

........................
West, I don't need you to tell me that retired military are not eligible for TSA Pre Check. That simple fact is what my post was addressing.

The classification by DHS of former military as "Potential Domestic Terrorist" is so insulting that I can't put into words what I feel about DHS and the people who comprise DHS and the agencies that fall under that Department.

That DHS classification means that you, West, are classified as a Potential Domestic Terrorist as well as thousands of other TSA employees.

In my mind I see Retired Military in a whole different category than just former military. Yes the others served their time, did their duty, and all the other things that entails but there is still a difference. It boils down to known history and the requirements needed to be a retired service member.

Yet as we both know TSA doesn't give any respect for the long service of the United States Military Retired servicemen.

TSA Pre check is supposed to be for those people identified as a low risk but TSA selects people willy nilly for Pre check through whats called Managed Inclusion, well unless your 75 years old or older, then TSA discriminates against the elderly.

Yet TSA seems completely clueless to understanding that Retired Military have proven through many years of military service that they are little to no risk to the air transportation system.

All I can conclude is that TSA is ran by incompetents.



Anonymous said...

How about a statement from TSA concerning the Stacey Armato case?

Anonymous said...

The TSA leadership is obviously overflowing with government bureaucrats who sit around and think of non-sense policies that appease a few of their so called key stakeholders while ignoring the majority of law-abiding taxpayers who fund this disgraced agency's budget.

Ann said...

Why aren't you allowed to post about anything newsworthy, or even support the other writers on tsa.gov?

They just did a piece about screeners helping someone, all in an effort to make the "behavior detection" squad not appear to be a waste of a billion dollars. Why has this blog been sent to the back of the room and ignored by your superiors?

RB said...

Since TSA won't talk about the full body gropes of a 2 and 6 year old I will.

Who in their right mind would think doing such a distgusting thing is acceptable?

What kind of policy maker would approve this?

Better yet, what exceptional evidence was present to make such an act even remotely necessary?

TSA seems to not understand that there are limits to what the public will tolerate. Abusing our children crosses that line.

The involved TSA screeners, their supervisors, the TSM, and that airports FSD should be fired for stupidity!


Anonymous said...

"So children are no longer being patted down, eh?"

The secret of good state security is to keep the people guessing, never knowing what to expect. A cowed people are a docile people. So, if it appears that the government doesn't follow its rules, it is for a purpose. Think of how many terrorists see the film clip and think, "If they so thoroughly check children, what chance do I have of breaching security?"

We should all get together with TSA to ensure safe travel.

Anonymous said...

Notice that West of "TSA Blog Team" conveniently doesn't address the latest video of TSA child molestation, nor the wheel well wonder, even though several readers have asked about them here.

Oh, well, just ignore the bad stuff and it'll go away. Right, West?

RB said...

 Anonymous said...Notice that West of "TSA Blog Team" conveniently doesn't address the latest video of TSA child molestation, nor the wheel well wonder, even though several readers have asked about them here.Oh, well, just ignore the bad stuff and it'll go away. Right, West?April 24, 2014 at 3:11 PM
........................

Speaking of the Wheel Well Wonder how many know that TSA declared video showing the WWW approaching the airplane to be SSI?

Nothing like trying to hide TSA failures from the public to instill confidence in the public.

And before anyone says TSA isn't responsible for perimeter security please remember that TSA approves the airports security plan, that makes TSA resposible.

Jill said...

And the "team," aka West, failed to approve my comment about how creepy people were going to get a lot out of the video of the screener rubbing the body of a 6 yr old. I specifically said I didn't think the screener got anything out of it.

My comment did not violate ANY blog policy. If you haven't already deleted it, West, follow this taxpayer-paid goverment blog rules and approve it.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "I am not SB, but I provided a relevant link in a previous blog comment."

That is a different subject, the claim was that "you'll learn that many of those responsible for the most notorious hijackings of the '60s and '70s were disgruntled members of the military.". I admit I did not do in-depth research on the subject, but in 10 minutes, I was only able to find 3 hijackings that involved a military connection. that does not qualify as "many" based on the rest of the commentary. I was asking for more information on that particular subject, because I wish to understand where their statement came from.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

>> I was only able to find 3 hijackings that
>> involved a military connection

But how could a member of the military have ever pulled off any hijacking, if they are so more trustworthy than the population at large?

Please explain, West.

Mainer04270 said...

Anonymous said, Why don't you people just make this the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of keeping it as a perk reserved for the wealthy elite?

My husband and I are TSA prechecked and we're neither wealthy or elite! Just saying...

RB said...

Poll Shows Majority of Americans Believe TSA PreCheck Hurts Security


The online Harris Poll of 2,234 adults conducted March 12 to 17 found that 68% of respondents believe that the TSA PreCheck program, which enables qualifying passengers to proceed faster through separate security lanes without removing their shoves, and their laptops from bags during screenings will make it easier for potential threats to go undetected.

...........

Comments TSA?

Anonymous said...

West, why do you and your fellow bloggers refuse to answer questions about why you people don't just make this the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of keeping it as a perk reserved for the wealthy elite?

Anonymous said...

Mainer04270 wrote: "My husband and I are TSA prechecked and we're neither wealthy or elite"

Did you pay a total of $170 for PreCheck enrollment or did you get it automatically through some other program?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"So children are no longer being patted down, eh?"

The secret of good state security is to keep the people guessing, never knowing what to expect. A cowed people are a docile people. So, if it appears that the government doesn't follow its rules, it is for a purpose. Think of how many terrorists see the film clip and think, "If they so thoroughly check children, what chance do I have of breaching security?"

We should all get together with TSA to ensure safe travel.
----------------------------------
if you really believe the totalitarian, big brother doublespeak you just typed, I weep for the future of our Nation. when people do not simply tolerate state overreach (which is bad enough), but encourage it, the American Dream is over.

Anonymous said...

"...the American Dream is over."

Yes, it ended on the 11th day of September, 2001. Dreams are not reality. Reality is that this is a cruel world with people dedicated to destroying others. Everyone must be vigilant. If the loss of privileges written two-hundred years ago annoys you, move to Russia.

Anonymous said...

"If the loss of privileges written two-hundred years ago annoys you, move to Russia."

really hope you are just trolling. rights are not privileges, and the only thing that was written 200 years ago was a legal agreement that our government would not to infringe on them. that Constitution remains the law of the land, and the government needs to stop ignoring it and trying to end-around it.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "West, why do you and your fellow bloggers refuse to answer questions about why you people don't just make this the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of keeping it as a perk reserved for the wealthy elite?"

TSA Pre ✓™ is not a perk for the "wealthy elite", it is a program open to anyone (within limits, there are some disqualifying factors and guidelines for application - see the FAQ page linked below for details) that wishes to participate. There is a cost of $85 involved, but that is explained in the FAQ section, on the right hand side of the page you will see the Fee Development Report. This $85 dollars covers 5 years of participation in the program, and is used to cover (at least some) of the costs incurred by the government to run the program.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Anon sez - "West, why do you and your fellow bloggers refuse to answer questions about why you people don't just make this the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of keeping it as a perk reserved for the wealthy elite?"

TSA Pre ✓™ is not a perk for the "wealthy elite", it is a program open to anyone (within limits, there are some disqualifying factors and guidelines for application - see the FAQ page linked below for details) that wishes to participate. There is a cost of $85 involved, but that is explained in the FAQ section, on the right hand side of the page you will see the Fee Development Report. This $85 dollars covers 5 years of participation in the program, and is used to cover (at least some) of the costs incurred by the government to run the program.

West
TSA Blog Team

April 30, 2014 at 7:35 AM
________________________

The government is already well funded (over funded) to operate transportation security through direct taxes and ticket security fees. Even then TSA has demonstrated a complete lack of responsible use of budgeted funds.

Let us remember the warehouses in the DFW area housing millions of dollars of unused TSA equipment.

Or how TSA tossed the Explosive Trace Portals in the trash.

And how much did it cost taxpayers for TSA to buy the dangerous and now removed from use Backscatter Strip Search Machines?

And what is the cost of the TSA BDO program? Proven by GAO to be so ineffective that a recommendation has been made to defund the program, yet TSA still ignores the proven facts that BDO's don't earn their keep?

Neither taxpayers or individuals should have to pay for Pre Check since the more people screened by that standard lowers the workload on the remaining TSA screeners. It is a workforce gain for TSA to have more people in the Pre Check pipeline and reduces overall screening cost.

TSA should be paying people to sign up for Pre Check, not the other way around.

Ronny O.F. said...

How about the rarely mentioned reason to be denied precheck (and losing $85) - having a disagreement with an AIRLINE employee, West? Any comment on that?

Wintermute said...

GSOLTSO said...

TSA Pre ✓™ is not a perk for the "wealthy elite"...

And then contradicted himself by saying...


There is a cost of $85 involved

$85 is not a small chunk of change for an expectant father. If you can afford to throw $85 away for the chance to buy back some of our guaranteed rights, then you're part of the "wealthy elite."

Wintermute said...

TSAnonymous said...

" If the loss of privileges written two-hundred years ago annoys you, move to Russia."

They're not privileges. They are rights. The fact that we have them is what allows you to spout such nonsense. You DO enjoy that right, don't you?

Second, Russia is less free than we are. New Zealand is generally much more free than we are, but nearly impossible to obtain citizenship if you or your parents weren't born there. Also, it's very, very difficult to renounce your US citizenship. I've checked (not because I want to, but because of the "don't like it, move to xxxxxx country" nonsense). You don't simply move somewhere and say "I'm not longer a US Citizen."

Greg said...

Why does the TSA want to background search and fingerprint every person who wants to get on a plane? Over 500 million people fly every year. Why does the TSA want the private information of hundreds of millions of people?

What are you doing with that information? Turning it over to your DHS buddies at the NSA?

Anonymous said...

I agree. My wife and I both needed to " Buy into the Program" for the sum of
$ 100. Each. I agree. Has not 23 faithful years demonstrated that I am most likely one to be a "Trusted Traveler". Besides I'm one of those "Good Guys" you want on your Aircraft. It's the same old deal - give the most - Get the least. Unless of course you qualify for a special Government Program if you know what I mean

Ethan said...

These are the last people who deserve any special treatment. This is just government looking out for government.