Tuesday, April 8, 2014

TSA Travel Tips: Traveling With Portable Oxygen



When traveling with portable oxygen, the first thing travelers should do is contact their airline. Not all airlines allow the use of portable oxygen concentrators, so that’s a very important first step. Travelers should also check with the manufacturer to determine whether their specific oxygen concentrator is approved for in-flight use.

Here’s what passengers can expect when traveling with portable oxygen through TSA checkpoints:
  • If a passenger can disconnect from his or her portable oxygen, it’s recommended that the passenger check the equipment as checked baggage whenever possible. This makes the screening process simpler for all involved.
  • Passengers who can disconnect are able to be screened using imaging technology or walk-through metal detectors.
  • If a passenger cannot disconnect, or chooses not to be screened by imaging technology or a walk-through metal detector, he or she will be screened using a pat-down procedure instead. A pat-down procedure is also used to resolve any alarms from a metal detector or anomalies identified by imaging technology.
  • If a passenger is bringing his or her portable oxygen concentrator in carry-on baggage, the equipment will either undergo X-ray screening or inspection. If the passenger’s respiratory equipment cannot be X-rayed and an inspection is done, it also will be tested for traces of explosives. If explosive material is detected, the passenger will have to under undergo additional screening.
Passengers are encouraged to consult with their doctors to determine whether they can safely disconnect during screening. It is important for a passenger to inform the officer conducting the screening whether he or she can disconnect before the screening process begins. If an officer insists that you disconnect, please request to speak with a supervisor or manager.

See you next week with more TSA travel tips!

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23 comments:

Linda Carter said...

I use this all the time. also teach this for Oxygen preplanning before you travel.

Anonymous said...

Did you actually write this blotter post, Bob? It is rather well done, and not smarmy at all.

Will this blotter post be forwarded to all TSA supervisors so they know they are supposed to help flyers who need additional oxygen?

What is the TSA process of coordinating what the blotter team writes and what supervisors in the screening areas are told to do?

Susan Richart said...

"Anonymous said...

Did you actually write this blotter post, Bob? It is rather well done, and not smarmy at all."

I believe Linda Carter who posted the first comment wrote a large part of it or had significant input. Look her up on the internet. She's done lots of good work advocating for those who require oxygen all the time.

The blog still needs an editor or proof reader:

"the passenger will have to under undergo additional screening."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

RB said...

Blogger Bob said..."If a passenger can disconnect from his or her portable oxygen, it’s recommended that the passenger check the equipment as checked baggage whenever possible. This makes the screening process simpler for all involved."

Shouldn't TSA take any and all steps required to make the screening process as simple for the traveler as can be done? I see no reason for the passenger to take steps to make TSA's job easier. It's what you peop;e are being paid to do.

Blogger Bob said .... "Passengers who can disconnect are able to be screened using imaging technology or walk-through metal detectors."

Can passengers now choose WTMD's over imaging technology?

Airlinejobs said...

So the title is somewhat of a misnomer. Portable Oxygen and Portable Oxygen Concentrators (POC) are two entirely differrent things in the airline world. Portable Oxygen is a small portable bottle of oxygen, while a POC is what this article is about. Many airlines do not allow a passenger to have portable oxygen in small bottles, and the ones that do, do not allow passengers to provide their own it must be airline provided.
Most all airlines allow the use of POCs, but they may not allow all of them, because they may be to large to fit in under the seat in front of you, so I would check with the airline to find out if your specific POC is allowed to be used on board. SFAR 106 requires airlines to keep a list of the specific POCs that the airline allows to be used on board the aircraft.
Bob, while your blog is about TSA/Screeming and I am sure the information you give is good, it seems it could be better if you could be on the same page the airlines are on so your product can be the best it can be. I and other airline regulatory compliance would be glad to help.

Anonymous said...

Gee, is that why Primo Meza and his daughter were abused in July of 2012?

"Disabled elderly man detained by TSA, misses flight"

http://tsanewsblog.com/4093/news/disabled-elderly-man-detained-by-tsa-misses-flight/

I wonder if this comment will ever see the light of day.

RB said...

Susan Richart said..

."Anonymous said...Did you actually write this blotter post, Bob?

It is rather well done, and not smarmy at all."I believe Linda Carter who posted the first comment wrote a large part of it or had significant input. Look her up on the internet. She's done lots of good work advocating for those who require oxygen all the time. The blog still needs an editor or proof reader:"the passenger will have to under undergo additional screening."screen shot/DHS OIG statementApril 9, 2014 at 6:57 AM
?...............?
Are you suggesting that Blogger Bob put his name on another persons work?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

You said "... If an officer insists that you disconnect, please request to speak with a supervisor or manager."

Then what?

Last time I asked to speak to a supervisor I was asked if I wanted to fly today.

Posting it here on your blog is fine, it sets the correct expectation from your subjects.

The average agent in the field, however, doesn't get his SOP from this blog so all you have done is set up a situation of conflict because what I have, in writing, doesn't match what they have, SSI so I don't know if it is actually written down.

Couldn't the TSA just save a lot of time by simply telling all the people who have medical issues to take the bus?

@SkyWayManAz said...

"If a passenger can disconnect from his or her portable oxygen, it’s recommended that the passenger check the equipment as checked baggage whenever possible. This makes the screening process simpler for all involved."

Just because someone can disconnect might not mean it is a good idea to. The airplane cabin is only pressurized to the equivalent of 8,000' above sea level. Someone in this situation might be fine just sitting in most major US cities but suddenly have serious issues trying to breath in Denver at only 5,280'. A friend of mine when he became an F/O at a major carrier had his Captain let someone on who was able to disconnect with his equipment checked. The Captain figured PHX-TUS was such a short flight that even if the passenger needed to use some of the planes oxygen available in an emergency to a passenger it wouldn't be a problem. That one passenger ended up sucking down almost all the oxygen in their system before the plane landed. This was long before 9/11 but I doubt that Captain and my friend who is now a Captain would ever make that mistake again.

RB said...

I have a very reliable report that all passengers were being ran through the WTMD, shoes and belts on, wallets in pockets, with only cell phones and other carry on baggage being required to go through the x-ray machine at LAX last week.

New trial screening process or broken equipment?

Chris Boyce said...

It looks like several senior TSA employees will be needing some of that oxygen:

http://tinyurl.com/ko69drp

I don't imagine you'll be making a public comment any time soon. But, we would be very interested to know why so many of you violated the public trust be participating in this gun-buying black market.

I know the IG has a lot on their plate right now, but, I made a screen shot anyway.

RB said...

Bobby, when are you intending to tell the public about the current investigations against senior FAMS officials?

Air Marshal director stepping down amid agency gun scheme probe

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/04/10/air-marshal-director-probe-over-gun-scheme/

This sounds like some very wide spread corruption of Pistole's FAMS agency.

Anonymous said...

AirlineJobs: "...it seems it could be better if you could be on the same page the airlines are on..."

Maybe you missed this paragraph:
When traveling with portable oxygen, the first thing travelers should do is contact their airline. Not all airlines allow the use of portable oxygen concentrators, so that’s a very important first step. Travelers should also check with the manufacturer to determine whether their specific oxygen concentrator is approved for in-flight use.

Bubba said...

How dare you suggest that people check a medical necessity that can easily be lost in transit, just to make your life easier?
How dare you suggest that a person disconnect from their oxygen just so you can follow your unjustified "procedures"?
How dare you not publish my previous message asking all this??

Susan Richart said...

RB wrote: "Are you suggesting that Blogger Bob put his name on another persons work?"

Oh, RB, I would never even think of making such an accusation. ;-)

But isn't it extremely coincidental that a person who is deeply involved in teaching people dependent on oxygen how to survive travel makes the very first comment in this thread?

screen shot; DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

RB wrote: "I have a very reliable report that all passengers were being ran through the WTMD, shoes and belts on, wallets in pockets, with only cell phones and other carry on baggage being required to go through the x-ray machine at LAX last week."

RB, are you saying that people after being cleared by WTMD were then forced in the the surrender position machine?

There was a report on FT that an MMW had been installed at a pre-check checkpoint at another airport.

Perhaps this is going to become SOP. You know, in order to keep those pesky terrorists off balance.

screen shot; DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Susan Richart said...RB wrote: "I have a very reliable report that all passengers were being ran through the WTMD, shoes and belts on, wallets in pockets, with only cell phones and other carry on baggage being required to go through the x-ray machine at LAX last week."

RB, are you saying that people after being cleared by WTMD were then forced in the the surrender position machine? There was a report on FT that an MMW had been installed at a pre-check checkpoint at another airport. Perhaps this is going to become SOP. You know, in order to keep those pesky terrorists off balance.

screen shot; DHS OIG statementApril 13, 2014 at 8:03 AM

No WTMD only screening. Just like it was befoe the blight called TSA infected the country. It was Las Vegas (LAS) not (LAX).

Susan Richart said...

Thanks for the clarification, RB.

Richard said...

Yes I did read the first paragraph, and it asks readers to check and see if the airline takes POCs at all, not if a reader's specific POC is allowed. So if the reader just ask the airline if they allow POCs, they may just get a "YES" as 1-800 numbers cost airlines money and people who take calls are graded on how fast they handle a call, then get to the airport and find out that their airline do not take their specific POC. If they call the manuafacturer, they probably know they have built the POC to the standards that would allow them to be used in flight, but probably would not know which specific airline allows the POC(s) that they manufacture. I would truly be surprised if there were a 14 CFR Part 121 air carrier that did not allow POCs, however I know for a fact that not all air carriers take all approved POCs, hence the suggestion to readers to call their specific airline to see if they take they reader's specific POC. DMWM

Anonymous said...

"Passengers are encouraged to consult with their doctors..., please request to speak with a supervisor or manager."

So, does that mean DYWTFT or does that mean that TSA's supervisors have now been trained to recognize if PME is actually required or not?

Maybe, just maybe, something a little smarter is in order? Like how the German airport security keeps "known" wooden canes at their portals. Or how some Japanese airports have "temporary loaner" oxygen sources? Or Narita with its "known wheelchair" program? Or better yet, Signapore with its "prelim screen on entry, final screen at gate" arrangement that actually works - unlike Honolulu's disaster.

Anonymous said...

WHATEVER...GO AHEAD..BE A TSA..THEN TELL US HOW IT FEELS

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"WHATEVER...GO AHEAD..BE A TSA..THEN TELL US HOW IT FEELS"

Huh? What do you mean? You mean, walk a mile in a TSO's shoes? No thanks. I will not be complicit in the commission of crimes against the Constitution of the United States of America.

For those who give the TSO's a pass, I'm sorry, but I will not. It does not matter that they are "just doing their jobs." They have a choice about what job they want to take. The pay and benefits might be better, but you couldn't pay me enough to betray my oath to my country.