Tuesday, April 1, 2014

TSA Travel Tips: Travelers with Diabetes or other Medical Conditions


If you are being treated for diabetes or some other medical condition and have concerns about TSA’s screening process,  please contact the TSA Cares Helpline. Travelers or families of passengers with disabilities and medical conditions can call the helpline toll free 855-787-2227, prior to traveling with any questions about screening policies, procedures and what to expect at the security checkpoint.

Helpful information for diabetic travelers:

  • Diabetes related supplies, equipment, and medication, including liquids, are allowed through the checkpoint once they have been screened. Passengers should declare these items and separate them from other belongings before screening begins.
  • Accessories required to keep medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols cool are permitted through the screening checkpoint and may be subject to additional screening.
  • Liquids, gels, and aerosols are screened by X-ray and medically necessary items over 3.4 ounces will receive additional screening. A passenger could be asked to open the liquid or gel for additional screening. The TSA officer will not touch the liquid or gel during this process. If the passenger does not want a liquid, gel, or aerosol X-rayed or opened for additional screening, he or she should inform the officer before screening begins. Additional screening of the passenger and his or her property may be required, which may include a pat-down. You have the option of requesting a visual inspection of your insulin and diabetes associated supplies.
  • Passengers who have insulin pumps can be screened using imaging technology, metal detector, or a thorough pat-down. A passenger can request to be screened by pat-down in lieu of imaging technology. Screening can be conducted without disconnecting from the pump. However, it is important to let the officer know about the pump before the screening process begins.
  • Regardless of whether passengers are screened using imaging technology or metal detectors, insulin pumps are subject to additional screening. Under most circumstances, this will include the passenger conducting a self pat-down of the insulin pump followed by an explosive trace detection sampling of the hands.
  • Be sure to let an officer know if your sugar is dropping during screening or if you need medical assistance.
TSA wants to ensure both a safe and pleasant experience for all travelers by making the screening process as seamless as possible.


See you next week with more TSA travel tips!

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51 comments:

CJ Dill said...

I have traveled many, many times with a liquid homeopathic medicine that cannot go through the xray scanner.
I simply notify the agent as I approach the scanner and the medicine is hand-carried to the other side where it is examined as stated above. I must say that I have always been treated respectfully regardless of the level of inspection, which does vary. I just plan for a little more time.

Anonymous said...

First of all, most, if not all, pump manufacturers say to not go through the body scanners. That's scary since if the scanners have damaged a robust device like an insulin pump, what are the scanners doing to the human body.

Second, why does the TSA continue to use a flawed test such as the explosive trace swab? It has been shown to falsely alarm on common items such as hand lotion, soap, and even road salt. I had a TSA screener warn me about using the soap in the restrooms before the checkpoint. Apparently the soap contained a chemical in it that was mistakenly identified as an explosive.

Finally, if someone does test positive with the swab, why does the subsequent screening have to be done in a private room? There is nothing that is done in there that should require a private room. I've been in there and wasn't strip searched. It could have been done at the checkpoint. Is the TSA embarrassed about the extra screening? It wasn't that much worse than what I normally go through for wearing an insulin pump.

Whatever happened to the metal detector wands? They seemed to work great. They were faster and lead to less groping.

Bubba said...

Insulin pump manufacturers advise against using full body scanners. That means thousands of diabetics are treated with a "thorough pat down". What does this include? It includes an officer rubbing his/her hands all over your body (no patting at all, only rubbing), inserting hands into collars, waistbands and combing their hands through your hair. It also includes a karate chop to the groin area. The very telling use of the "thorough" term by the TSA is indicative that they want it to be punitive for those of us who dare not to enter full body scanning machines.

Is that an acceptable procedure for diabetics to be submitted to every single time they travel? I say no.

Susan Richart said...

Why do individuals who wear insulin pumps, ostomy bags, prothetics have to be singled out every time they go through a security checkpoint? That is discrimination at its very worst.

Please don't try to tell us that a terrorist could hide explosives in a pump or bag. You tried that line with little kids and old folks, although frail old folks still get the full monty.

Your ETD machines are faulty, at best, and alarm on too many innocuous substances to be of any use. TSA has never found anyone carrying any explosives through an ETD test.

The TSA is not the "gold standard" of airport screening as John Pistole and Karen Burke have recently claimed. Rather, it's more like the "fools gold standard."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

I use a clear box holding syringes, insulin, meter and related supplies which I remove from my bag and place in a bucket like my laptop. The TSA officer can see the contents without risking a needle stick or letting me get another prick when they dislodge a cap while rummaging.

I do not declare verbally as I am usually traveling with coworkers who do not know I'm diabetic. Forget ADA - you're first on the layoff list if most companies find out you're diabetic.

Anonymous said...

Susan--why so much angst against the TSA--what's your story? RB answered us and as I remember, it has something to do with his feet. TSO Burns--maybe the next one of these should be about foot problems so RB can have a pleasant experience too.

RB said...

TSA's Blogger Bob Burns is once again putting out information that is questionable and very likely to cause damage to expensive insulin pumps.

The statement from this article stating: "Passengers who have insulin pumps can be screened using imaging technology, metal detector, or a thorough pat-down" clearly disagrees with other reliable guidance on the subject. For TSA to put out this information is unconscionable and should be retracted immediately.

Here is what reliable sources say on the matter of insulin pumps and airport screening:

Insulin pumps and full-body scanners

Insulin pump manufacturers typically recommend that you remove your insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring device before going through the body scanner. However, don't send your devices through the X-ray machine as an alternative.

Can diabetes devices be damaged by airport security scanners?

Full-body or X-ray scanners used for airport security screening may affect the function of insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices.

Navigating Airport Security with an Insulin Pump and/or Sensor

Full-body or X-ray scanners used for airport security screening may affect the function of insulin pumps or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices.

It is certainly up to the individual users of these devices to choose screening via Strip Search Machine or Whole Body Grope Down but for TSA, through Blogger Bob Burns, to continue to put out dangerous and possibly life threatening information demonstrates how little interest TSA has in your safety.

Ask yourself this, who do you trust, your medical professionals or Bob Burns?


Anonymous said...

"Why do individuals who wear insulin pumps...have to be singled out..."

TSA personnel are only following procedures. Procedures based on government assessment of the risks of aviation travel. It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11.

Better safe than sorry.

Anonymous said...

"TSA personnel are only following procedures. Procedures based on blind panic, overreaction, scientific illiteracy, lies, and stupidity."

Fixed it for you.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"Why do individuals who wear insulin pumps...have to be singled out..."

TSA personnel are only following procedures. Procedures based on government assessment of the risks of aviation travel. It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11.

Better safe than sorry.

---------------------------

The TSA hasn't prevented another 9/11. Hardened cockpit doors and the unwillingness of passengers to cooperate with hijackers anymore has prevented another 9/11. United flight 93 showed that people weren't going to cooperate anymore.

The TSA would not have stopped 9/11 if they existed. Boxcutters were permitted and the terrorists had valid tickets and ID's.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I use a clear box holding syringes, insulin, meter and related supplies which I remove from my bag and place in a bucket like my laptop. The TSA officer can see the contents without risking a needle stick or letting me get another prick when they dislodge a cap while rummaging.

----------------------------

You shouldn't have to take out any of your supplies. I've traveled with syringes as a backup to my pump for years. I've never had any airport security worldwide pull them out of my bag or ask about them. I only mention my pump when I have to opt out of the body scanner and have to get a prison style patdown.



Anonymous said...

I’m tired of hearing all these objections about the TSA screenings, my wife and I travel ever year and am comfortable with all TSA screenings. We’d rather have a thorough screening of each and every passenger and feel secure during our flight. It in fact is impossible to detour all possibilities of terror whether on the ground or in the air but I’m content knowing all possible is being done to eliminate the opportunity. Those who complain would most likely be the first to highlight a TSA screening flaw if there were to be a flight terror disaster.
As in any profession there are personnel who may have the wrong personality for their position but the vast majorities are competent and well meaning. But even these TSA agents at times add to the fear and possibility of discovering of a potential terror attack. Therefore the next time your treated to a reasonable thorough TSA screening thank the agent cause their there for your safety. And “NO” I’m not a TSA agent just an airline passenger who enjoys flying with peace of mind that all possible is being done for my security. DJC

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Susan--why so much angst against the TSA--what's your story? RB answered us and as I remember, it has something to do with his feet. TSO Burns--maybe the next one of these should be about foot problems so RB can have a pleasant experience too.

April 2, 2014 at 9:37 AM
................
I'm going to chip in here for just a bit.

For those who don't know there are two major classes of diabetic, Type I and Type II.

Type 1's bodies make little to no insulin and they must take insulin to stay alive. This is done either through injections or with insulin pumps.

Type 2's bodies do make insulin but for some reason their bodies do not use natural insulin well and they often take oral anti-diabetics and/or insulin as well.

Those people who use insulin pumps will certainly alarm the WBI but not the WTMD. On top of that and in disagreement with TSA information some manufacturers of Insulin Pumps advise to avoid any form of x-ray of Body Imaging device and to opt for a pat down. These devices are very expensive and it would be my counsel to follow the advice of healthcare professionals, not that of TSA.

Just a side note, some diabetics heal poorly, especially in the extremities. That is why we have to protect our hands and feet from injuries. Being forced to remove our shoes as TSA requires is a clear health hazard that just isn't necessary for aircraft security screening.

I submitted an earlier post that clearly shows that insulin pump users should follow their healthcare providers guidance on insulin pumps and airport body scanners. I notice that Blogger Bob has either not posted those comments yet are once again violated my Constitutional Rights to free speech.

tziplock said...

Please explain why you chose not to post my comment when it could benefit others with medical conditions involved in lengthy travel time and numerous connections?

Susan Richart said...

"Anonymous said...

Susan--why so much angst against the TSA--what's your story? RB answered us and as I remember, it has something to do with his feet. TSO Burns--maybe the next one of these should be about foot problems so RB can have a pleasant experience too."

I've answered that question already. Go find my response.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous wrote: "TSA personnel are only following procedures. Procedures based on government assessment of the risks of aviation travel. It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11."

And yet in court documents,the TSA recently admitted that there is no threat to airplanes from terrorists.

No, the TSA has NOT prevented another 9/11. What has prevented another terrorist attack again an airliner are the secured cockpit doors and the willingness of passengers to act.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Larry said...

Any advice or guidelines on travelling with portable Oxygen ?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"Why do individuals who wear insulin pumps...have to be singled out..."

TSA personnel are only following procedures. Procedures based on government assessment of the risks of aviation travel. It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11.

Better safe than sorry.


As somewhat of an expert on security, I find this reply insulting. There is no way the TSA has done a proper risk assessment and determined that their procedures provide an acceptable ROI for the actual risk involved. Only someone ignorant of how risk assessments actually work would come to that conclusion.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"Susan--why so much angst against the TSA--what's your story?"

Why does someone with an opposing viewpoint have to have "angst?" Why do they need a "story" to see through the TSA's security theater?

I am also anti-TSA, because I know a thing or two about security, and what the TSA does is anything but. And my sense of pride in my country is why I lament the loss of liberties - and for what? So someone who doesn't know any better can "feel" safe, even through they aren't any safer at all?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Susan--why so much angst against the TSA--what's your story?

her story is the same as for most of us: she recognizes that TSA is a massive waste of taxpayer's dollar, does nothing to make aviation safer, does nothing to prevent another terror attack, and causes another massive waste of dollars due to wasted time and missed connections that could be used for more productive purposes.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Procedures based on government assessment of the risks of aviation travel. It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11.

regarding your first sentence, there is no way to verify that ANY of TSA's procedures are based on government or other assessment of risk. their procedures and any such assessments are both held as a deep, dark secret from the public. TSA lacks transparency, and that is part of the problem. regarding your second sentence, TSA and their procedures have stopped exactly ZERO terror attacks, and have prevented exactly ZERO 9/11 events. if another such attack had been planned, it was stopped by reinforcing cockpit doors, and changing procedures on the airplane (i.e., the flight crew and passengers now know that they must resist or die). TSA had nothing to do with either of those things. TSA is a waste of taxpayer dollars that could be doing a lot more good, or be returned to the hard working folks they were taken from.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
"Why do individuals who wear insulin pumps...have to be singled out..."

TSA personnel are only following procedures. Procedures based on government assessment of the risks of aviation travel. It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11.

Better safe than sorry.

April 2, 2014 at 12:31 PM

............................
Procedures based on government assessment of risks to of aviation travel by people who use insulin pumps.

I would surely like to see that risk assessment. I'm willing to bet a lunch that there is no such government assessment of people who use insulin pumps and the risk they pose to aviation travel.

The bottom line for those travelers who use insulin pumps and other external medical devices is that they are subjected to more onerous screening by TSA which in all likelihood violates the ADA act.

If TSA can show that people who use an insulin pump present a greater risk to aviation travel I am all ears.

There is nothing to show that TSA procedures has stopped or prevented another 9/11. Anon, if you happen to be in possession of that information then post it!

Anonymous said...

"While the expected
likelihood of PMED effects from exposure to the MMW AIT-1 appears to be rare, these
findings might not be applicable for every model and type of PMEDs that could be
exposed to the MMW AIT-1." This quote was taken from the same source the TSA is quoting from. Source can be found here http://www.tsa.gov/sites/default/files/assets/pdf/foia/dhssttsl12118_03142013.pdf

Anonymous said...

During exposures conditions for the DUT settings mentioned above, no changes were
observed in the output, settings or programming of the DUTs. "However, two of the
DUTs (D7, D8) malfunctioned at a time when they were not being tested in the MMW
AIT-1. Further evaluation is being done to examine and resolve the device malfunctions.
These malfunctions are not related to exposure to emissions from the MMW AIT-1." This quote claims 2/8 failed after exposure. 25% failure after an exposure to the scanner makes me nervous. They say it wasn't the scanner that caused the malfunctions but do not explain what was the cause. Source: http://www.tsa.gov/sites/default/files/assets/pdf/foia/dhssttsl12118_03142013.pdf

Anonymous said...

Anonymous:"It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11."

What evidence do you have to support this comment? Wouldn't TSA be waiving that a second 9/11 stop like a giant flag of pride?

Anonymous said...

My two cents on a few of the comments so far:

"Finally, if someone does test positive with the swab, why does the subsequent screening have to be done in a private room? There is nothing that is done in there that should require a private room. I've been in there and wasn't strip searched. It could have been done at the checkpoint. Is the TSA embarrassed about the extra screening?

Think about it for two seconds before assuming the worst about TSA. If a person tests positive for an explosive, they need to be immediately removed to a secluded area away from the public to avoid a potentially catastrophic situation. The first concern is for public safety. In the private area, the initial detection can be either proved or disproved.

"Whatever happened to the metal detector wands? They seemed to work great. They were faster and lead to less groping."

Obviously, the TSA must have good reasons for not using them anymore. The TSA probably knows things about them that we, the public, do not.

I am not a diabetic and have no medical conditions that would prevent me from entering the full body scanner. However, I have never entered one and do not intend to. I politely decline and request a full body pat down instead in a private area. If I don't get the full groping treatment, I feel cheated. Seriously, I really do want them to be thorough on me and anyone else receiving a pat down. The whole thing is done professionally and a person gets used to it after going through it enough times.

Anonymous said...

"It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11."

It is foolhardy to accept without proof anything you hear from parties that have an interest in making sure that your tax dollars keep them employed, keep their companies profitable, and/or keep their campaign coffers full.

So, prove that TSA checkpoint procedures have prevented another 9/11.

Anonymous said...

This is the gist of what we are read here: "The TSA obviously knows more about the design of constant infusion insulin pumps than the manufacturers do. There is no possiblechance of electromagnetic interference from close-proximity high-voltage disrupting the operating characteristics of any medical device. Anyone who says otherwise is a security threat."

No wonder the TSA, as agency, is more hated than the IRS.

Anonymous said...

TSAnonymous said: "It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11."
To borrow from another civil disobedient: Since I started praying to my pet rock, there have been no terrorist attacks. Therefore my pet rock protects me from terrorist attacks.
Absence of terrorist attacks does not mean that anything the TSA is doing has prevented them. There have been no substantiated reports of terrorist activity thwarted by the TSA. Period.

Bubba said...

Dear Anonymous on April 2nd,

These procedures have not prevented another Sep. 11th. All they have done is inconvenience us and give a lot of money to full body scanner manufacturers. In fact, based on their mechanism of action, body scanners are worse at detecting guns than metal detectors. There are parts on the human body in which a willing person can now smuggle a gun into an airport undetected!

All this while innocent diabetics, breast cancer survivors, persons with incontinence, persons with ostomies and a plethora of other medical conditions are singled out needlessly.

This needs to stop!

BTL said...

With all due respect. I have traveled considerably as a Type II diabetic. In addition I use other injectable type medications (Low-T). In My experience with TSA they have always been accommodating, and at some locations appear oblivious to the medical materials I bring thru the check-point. I say that not to be disrespectful but as in my opinion they are well versed in these materials and has become second nature for them not to be alarmed. I even traveled with the Dr's note indicating my Prescription(s) and to date have NEVER needed it. I am sure there are TSA agents somewhere who are ill-informed but in general they seem to be aware and respectful with medically required materials. I do not require a Pump or body attached monitors (though I travel with an associate who does use a Pump) and have not yet had a problem nor incurred more than an extra minute or two to process thru the check-point.

Anonymous said...

With all due respect. I have traveled considerably as a Type II diabetic. In addition I use other injectable type medications (Low-T). In My experience with TSA they have always been accommodating, and at some locations appear oblivious to the medical materials I bring thru the check-point. I say that not to be disrespectful but as in my opinion they are well versed in these materials and has become second nature for them not to be alarmed. I even traveled with the Dr's note indicating my Prescription(s) and to date have NEVER needed it. I am sure there are TSA agents somewhere who are ill-informed but in general they seem to be aware and respectful with medically required materials. I do not require a Pump or body attached monitors (though I travel with an associate who does use a Pump) and have not yet had a problem nor incurred more than an extra minute or two to process thru the check-point.

Susan Richart said...

In case the Anonymous poster above who questioned me thinks I ignored him, please know I did not.

Bob would not post my response to you and it didn't even violate the TOS of this blog. Since it did not appear, I will be advising the DHS OIG of that fact.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

Interesting how about 20 comments just showed up this morning.......

Susan Richart said...

"Think about it for two seconds before assuming the worst about TSA. If a person tests positive for an explosive, they need to be immediately removed to a secluded area away from the public to avoid a potentially catastrophic situation. The first concern is for public safety. In the private area, the initial detection can be either proved or disproved. "

You have truly drunk of the Kool-Aid. If the TSA suspects someone is carrying explosives on their person, then the bomb squad should be called. Would you go into a room with someone who you think might have explosives on them without wearing protection from said explosives?

The answer is because they TSA does not want the general public to see them using the palms of the hands in the genitals or probing the breasts of their victims.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

"Therefore the next time your treated to a reasonable thorough TSA screening thank the agent cause their there for your safety. "

I haven't experienced a "reasonable" TSA screening since 2005.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I’m tired of hearing all these objections about the TSA screenings, my wife and I travel ever year and am comfortable with all TSA screenings. We’d rather have a thorough screening of each and every passenger and feel secure during our flight. It in fact is impossible to detour all possibilities of terror whether on the ground or in the air but I’m content knowing all possible is being done to eliminate the opportunity. Those who complain would most likely be the first to highlight a TSA screening flaw if there were to be a flight terror disaster.
As in any profession there are personnel who may have the wrong personality for their position but the vast majorities are competent and well meaning. But even these TSA agents at times add to the fear and possibility of discovering of a potential terror attack. Therefore the next time your treated to a reasonable thorough TSA screening thank the agent cause their there for your safety. And “NO” I’m not a TSA agent just an airline passenger who enjoys flying with peace of mind that all possible is being done for my security. DJC

April 2, 2014 at 2:14 PM

.....................
Does "Feeling Secure" really mean anything in respect to your actually safety?

The simple fact that all of the people you see servicing the airplane that you are about to fly on without any form of screening should give you pause to consider if you are really safe or not.

RB said...

Those who complain would most likely be the first to highlight a TSA screening flaw if there were to be a flight terror disaster.

..........................
TSA is the screening flaw!

RB said...

Anonymous said...
My two cents on a few of the comments so far:

"Finally, if someone does test positive with the swab, why does the subsequent screening have to be done in a private room? There is nothing that is done in there that should require a private room. I've been in there and wasn't strip searched. It could have been done at the checkpoint. Is the TSA embarrassed about the extra screening?

Think about it for two seconds before assuming the worst about TSA. If a person tests positive for an explosive, they need to be immediately removed to a secluded area away from the public to avoid a potentially catastrophic situation. The first concern is for public safety. In the private area, the initial detection can be either proved or disproved.


The private screening rooms are right at the checkpoint. They would not and do not protect others from an explosive device.

The real purpose of these private screenings is so TSA can hide from the public what they are really doing.

The limited administrative search that TSA is permitted must be public. Herding people into these private screening boxes violates the intent of an Administrative Search and should result in sanctions against TSA and its employees.

Indy said...

Insulin pump manufacturers say not to go through millimeter wave scanners with their pumps, yet this is the second blog in two months where you insist insulin pump users can go through MMW scanners.

I believe the reason why is that if you insisted that all diabetics with insulin pumps MUST get their breasts, buttocks, and genitals touched by TSA screeners (which appears to be what actually happens), then the TSA would be in violation of ADA or open to discrimination lawsuits.

Just like Sikhs and other people who wear religious garments, you say "can be screened, but may be subject to patdown," you say that to avoid looking like you're doing the exact discrimination you do every single day.

Instead of improving policies and procedures so as not to discriminate, what is your response?

"Pay the TSA $85, submit to a secret background check, and FBI fingerprinting. We may turn you down for precheck and you won't get your money back, and even if you have precheck, we may still touch your breasts, buttocks, and genitals."

A Tour of TSA Testing Facility https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security/tour-tsas-testing-facility

Stop lying to people who have the right to travel even though they may have a medical condition or religious belief.

*screen shot*

Safir said...

Anonymous 1 said, "It is foolhardy to question the procedures as the safety gained has prevented another 9/11."

It is foolhardy not to question the spending of $8 Billion every year on technology, procedures, and people who haven't proven themselves to stop anything except innocent people.



Anonymous 2 said, "Obviously, the TSA must have good reasons for not using them anymore. The TSA probably knows things about them that we, the public, do not."

Prove it. TSA wasted millions of dollars on useless machines that sit idle in a warehouse in Texas. (Try to find the article about how TSA tried to hide this fact from Congress.)

They spent millions of our tax dollars to bulk up the wallets of their vendors, so using cheap, proven technology was abandoned by the TSA.

RB said...

Susan Richart said...
Interesting how about 20 comments just showed up this morning.......

April 7, 2014 at 7:39 AM

,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Well withing the 12/24 hour window that West mentioned a while back.

April 1st to April 7th = 12 hours on a TSA time schedule.

Anonymous said...

"And “NO” I’m not a TSA agent just an airline passenger who enjoys flying with peace of mind that all possible is being done for my security."

Well, TSA is not yet doing "all possible" for your security. TSA employees have not inspected you and your wife's body cavities yet, have they? I didn't think so. That means there is a risk of a terrorist attack, and thus you should never, ever, ever fly again!

TSA doesn't screen airport employees particularly well either, you know. Google "TSA theft" sometime.

Indy said...

Not a TSAnonymous said, "Those who complain would most likely be the first to highlight a TSA screening flaw if there were to be a flight terror disaster."


ROTFLMAO!!! What a silly, illogical argument! You criticize an agency's policy, and when a tragedy happens, you suddenly & completely switch your point of view and think a bloated, ineffective agency would have been able to stop the tragedy?

The TSA does not and has never stopped terrorism. They do not and have never stopped an intelligent criminal from getting airside with whatever they wanted.

BTW, Not a TSAnonymous, this blotter post is about how the blotter team thinks insulin pump manufacturers know less than they do about insulin pumps.

RB said...

Larry said...
Any advice or guidelines on travelling with portable Oxygen ?

April 2, 2014 at 9:52 PM
.....................

Larry, I see that Doctor Bob burns is once again failing to communicate "all things TSA" and has failed to respond to your query.

I did a quick internet search and it looks like things may have changed a bit in regards to traveling by air with portable oxygen.

I'm not up to speed on the subject so I advise that you contact the airline you use before traveling next time

I did find this from United Airlines.

Portable oxygen concentrators

Unlike the TSA I hope you find this helpful.

Indy said...

You must have hit the blotter team's nerve, RB.:-Within three hours of your comment about portable oxygen concentrators, the blotter team wrote a post about it! Good job, RB!

Damian said...

Hey RB,

Thanks for providing the information in regards to TSA scans and insulin pumps. I'm a diabetic however I don't use a pump or injection. But seeing how a pump can be damage via TSA scan, it should be made more aware!

Anonymous said...

I'm always a bit wary about traveling with my diabetes. Although I've never had any problems getting my diabetes treatment through customs...

Dave said...

I think for travelers with low diabetes can control by their food and drinking style, avoid too many sugar and carbohidrate like sweet juice, coke, etc. but for higher diabetes they should bring insulin and control with local doctors.

Soumen Siddhanta said...

Thank you very much for this article. While you may need to use insulin and perhaps other medications, food is also crucial to maintaining a stable glucose level. You know that you must avoid all refined sugars. But they are not the only foods that cause high blood sugar. Refined carbohydrates of all sorts can spike your blood sugar. These are foods like white flour, highly processed grains in cereals, corn products such as tortillas, french fries and mashed potatoes. The list goes on. These may have been some of your favorite foods, so it may be hard to give them up. But when you understand that your very life may be at stake, the decision becomes easy.