Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Here’s What People Are Saying About TSA Pre✓™



Travelers around the country are moving through airports with greater ease  as a result of TSA Pre✓™, the expedited screening program that allows pre-approved travelers to leave on their shoes, light outerwear and belts and keep laptops in their case. TSA Pre™ is now at more than 115 U.S. airports and with nine air carriers (Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, JetBlue Airways, Southwest Airlines, United Airlines, US Airways and Virgin America). But we have no intention of stopping there—we are looking for more opportunities to expand the TSA Pre™ population every day.

To date, tens of millions of passengers have enjoyed shorter screening times as a result of TSA Pre™.

Travelers interested in applying for TSA Pre™ should go here to begin the pre-enrollment process. All TSA Pre™ program applicants must then visit an application center— like the new center at Washington Dulles International Airport— in person to verify their identity and citizenship/immigration status as well as to provide biographical information, (e.g. name, date of birth, address, etc.) and fingerprints. You can find a full listing of the more than 200TSA Pre™ applications centers here. TSA Pre™ is just one way we are moving away from the one-size fits all security. But don’t just take our word for it. 
Below is a sampling of what people across the country have been saying recently about TSA Pre™:


How do you like PreCheck?  Share your feedback about your TSA Pre™ experience on Twitter by using the hashtag #TSAprecheck. 

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram! 

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

64 comments:

Petaluma said...

From FT:

"Yep -- this was the TSA's objective all along and it has worked like a charm. I've written before that Precheck is no different than the Communist system of privileges. They doled them out as necessary to instill loyalty to the government and the fear of it, because the people lived with the fear that the government could withdraw those privileges at any time for any reason. Living in fear of the government is a good thing -- if you're the government."

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/22711908-post19.html

Screen Shot

Susan Richart said...

Hmmmmmmm....click on more than one link and this is what I get:

"Your current account does not have access to view this page.
Click here to logout and change accounts."

You blew it again, Bob.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

Comments from the one link I could open are anti-TSA:

http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2014/03/27/is-tsas-pre-check-status-worth-it/#comments

I highly suspect that most of the articles were written at the behest of the TSA, with talking points be provided by said agency.

You can't fool us, Bob.

screen shot/DHS OIG comment

Austin Fox said...

As I understand it, I could go through the pre-enrollment process, then visit an application center to prove who I am. Then, still risk not being chosen for the pre-check line when I fly. It only increases my odds. It's just not worth the extra time, cost and effort. Thanks, but no. I'll kick my shoes off.

Anonymous said...

TSA staff at security checkpoints need to be brought up to speed on these policies in order for them to be of benefit to passengers.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Anonymous said...

Don't put too many people in the program.

Anonymous said...

what people are REALLY saying about Pre[check] is that it should be the norm for screening, that TSA has no data to back up their policies, and being charged $85 for a partial return of a Constitutionally protected right is downright disgusting.

Anonymous said...

Why do random people get PreCheck?

I got it as a result of having Global Entry and had to go through interviews and a fee.

Lately the TSA lines at PreCheck (DFW D-22) are longer than Main Cabin lines!

Anonymous said...

So where is the evidence that PreCheck is actually a cost-effective investment in improved security as compared to pre-9/11 procedures plus locked cockpit doors? Why is TSA attempting to exempt PreCheck from the Privacy Act? Why do I always see 200 people in the non-PreCheck line for every 1 in the PreCheck line, such that the TSA employees in the PreCheck line are sitting around doing nothing most of the time?

Susan Knisely said...

Can TSA Pre(check)be denied?

Joan Eisenstodt said...

TSA pre-check is great IF you are able-bodied and don't need a wheelchair or mobility assistive device at an airport! It seems that in the process of designing pre-check, no one figured out how to manage those of us who need assistance. At DCA and LAS I was turned away because the wheelchair in which I was being pushed wasn't allowed to go through pre-check. It seems if you can stand a bit you can go through and the wheelchair and its pusher have to go all the way around. BOO! There's gotta be a better way.

Ralph Neely said...

I have been a member of Global Entry for three years. I have a hip replacement, and both knees replaced.
Unless I go through the scan(not always available) I have to go through a complete pat down?
There should be another way???

St. Quisby said...

I really like TSA Pre - was happily surprised to find out that my NEXUS pass was counted for domestic flights, too. It makes traveling a little more relaxing. Good idea, folks!

St. Quisby said...

I really appreciate getting TSA Pre - which I think was a result of getting my NEXUS pass recently. Makes the flight a little more relaxing not to wait in a long line to be screened. Great idea, folks!

Thomas Streed, Ph.D. said...

Why are NON-TSA Pre-checked passengers routinely herded into the TSA Pre-check lane at the San Diego Int'[l Airport?
This is the only airport that I have been at that does this.
When I have asked TSA Agents in San Diego about why I had to pay a fee to get Pre-checked to allow me to use theTSA Pre-check lanes, and other passengers do not, they rudely inform me that "they don't make the rules."
This procedure involves people that are NOT TSA Pre-checked to slow the screening process by being confused about what they have to do to get through the TSA Pre-check lanes.
Why is TSA requiring a fee in order to be TSA Pre-checked and yet, allowing NON-TSA Pre-checked passengers toi psss through the TSA Pre-checked lanes without having to pay for such a privilege?
Thomas Streed, Ph.D.

RB said...

I think TSA Pre Check is just another TSA scam so TSA employees have to do less work than they already are doing.

How does TSA Pre Check improve the security posture?

How can anyone just be selected out of a line for Managed Inclusion to Pre Check with any confidence they are less of a security concern?

How does not screening all airport workers, as is done to passengers, support a strong security posture?

TSA: If we can do it wrong we will.

Anonymous said...

Why don't you people just make this the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of keeping it as a perk reserved for the wealthy elite?

Kelly Sides said...

Yes, I was randomly picked to do this a couple of times. Very convienient and speeds the process up alot. I wish I flew enough to be able to get pre-certification all the time.

Anonymous said...

I registered through United airlines and so far have been sucessful to use twice out of the last 8 flights. when selected it works great but the randon aspect of it does not allow shorter schedules as you can't depend on beng able to use it every time. Every time I as why or why not, I'm told " Well Sir it is Randome"!!!

Anonymous said...

Pre check is a bad idea. I was selected at random twice and I appreciate the easier process, but why should I trust all those other people?? Do you think for a minute that terrorist types can't figure out who has precheck so they can somehow force them to sneak whatever aboard. I'm not sure I'd even trust the military....have you been reading the news lately? It took us a long time to train the public about what security was needed to fly. Even though it has it's faults at least it was somewhat uniform.
This isn't about convenience...it's about security.

Anonymous said...

Pre-Check is great until the line is clogged with people who were diverted over to the Pre-Check line because theirs was too long and who have no idea how Pre-Check functions. Either keep Pre-Check for those who qualified for it or screen everyone according to Pre-Check rules.

screenshot

James Elsea said...

The new procedures are a help, somewhat. After years of refusing to fly because of the TSA screenings, my wife talked me into flying instead of driving when she got us both Pre-screened type tickets. On the flight down to Florida everything was wonderful. TSA screening was not bad at all. When we went to the airport for our return flight home everything was the same for my wife but totally different for me. I was wearing my Marine Corp Tee-shirt and Pro-American baseball cap. I was made to empty all pockets, take off my shoes and cap. I was scanned for metal and then had a complete pat down. It did not end there. I was then checked for bomb making residue with the small pads and then the pads are checked with a machine. My shoes were checked for residue also. I told them to make it a complete check and have fun because I would not be flying anymore, period. I make sure they knew that I had stood by this country during the Vietnam war and did not turn against America back in the 60's and I surely would not do so now. My friends have told me that any Pro-American or Pro-Military clothing is a red flag in the eyes of our government and I should not wear those items to an airport. They asked me if I was going to go back to driving like the rest of us.? I think you what my answer was. I never said anything that would send up a red flag and I was not drinking, so you can forget them ideas.!

George said...

I think you missed the Wall Street Journal's article: http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304626304579505570417804570?mod=djemseat_t&mg=reno64-wsj

Also, you're inconsistent when editing headlines, changing some to Pre✓™ while leaving others as Pre-check or PreCheck.

I don't think you repeated TSA Pre✓™ enough times in this TSA Pre✓™ brilliant post about TSA Pre✓™ on the TSA Pre✓™ approved TSA Pre✓™ blog. TSA Pre✓™.

Anonymous said...

An excellent program that should be mandatory for all travelers. It should require renewal every year and be self-sustaining with user fees covering costs.

Bubba said...

I don´t qualify for Pre, because I am not American, and don´t live in the US. I am also not Dutch, South Korean or Mexican, so I can´t qualify through Global Entry. I am not Canadian, so I can´t apply for Sentri. Therefore, I am forced to go through the whole ridiculous US screening, choosing between being scanned or groped, taking my shoes off, etc.

Except of course when I am flying into and/or over the US, which I do without body scanners or taking off my shoes.

What sense does that make?

None.

Pre standards should be for everyone.

David B Chin said...

We tend to travel early evenings and am very disappointed that TSA Pre was closed when arrived at security

glorybe said...

Precheck works very well except sure wish for seniors with artificial joints a system could be added to eliminate the added body scan we were still required to go through on our trip this week!!!

Anonymous said...

I wouldn't know what people are saying since half your article links are invalid.

I guess being on the front lines of the War on Terror leaves little time for proofreading.

Adrian said...

One thing nobody is saying is exactly what PreCheck could possibly be checking about someone to determine if they pose a greater risk than others.

PreCheck is a scam to placate the elite who would otherwise shut down the TSA and their un-American "papers please" empire.

Anonymous said...

Delaying posting of comments til the public (or your bosses) see this blotter post? It's been 24 hrs since the post was put up, but no comments have been released for viewing.

*screen shot*

Anonymous said...

It's easy to expand the PreCheck protocols. Just make them the standard screening process for all travelers, with the possible exception of those possessing travel documents from certain, untrustworthy countries.

It would save traveler time, money and decrease the size of TSA's payroll.

Oh, wait, that last one keeps this idea off the table.

Anonymous said...

So let me see if I understand.... if I voluntarily surrender my right to privacy, voluntarily allow you to further breach my Fourth and Fifth Amendment rights, I can have the magic precheck card that may, or may not, let me skip to the front of the line in some airports.


Susan Richart said...

75.5 hours and counting.

RB said...

Pre check article went up Wednesday 4/16 at 12:11 PM Eastern and still no comments posted as of Friday 4/18, 18:42 Central.

West, what was that you said about 12/24 hours?

GSOLTSO said...

I have seen several mentions of the links not functioning properly in this post. I have redone all of the links, and they should all work properly now. Thanks for pointing out the glitches for us.

West
TSA Blog Team

Susan Richart said...

RB asked:

How can anyone just be selected out of a line for Managed Inclusion to Pre Check with any confidence they are less of a security concern?

John Pistole himself answered that question for you in a letter to the NY Times last week:

"The constant vigilance of more than 3,000 behavior-detection officers enables T.S.A. to expedite the screening of 150,000 low-risk passengers each day as part of our risk-based security."

and on December 19, 2013, in a letter to USA Today, he wrote:

"Our behavior detection officers also enable tens of thousands of low-risk passengers the opportunity to receive expedited screening every day. In fact, as part of a larger effort that relies on the observational techniques employed by our BDOs, 219,000 passengers were selected to go through expedited screening Dec. 1."

And for those of you complaining about the unwashed masses being allowed into Pre-Check lines, he also wrote:

"We expect that number to continue growing."

BTW, both these letters were in response to articles highly critical of the BDO program.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

The Wall Street Journal had an article about Pre-Check this past week. Unfortunately, it's behind a paywall and can't be read by the majority.

However, there were five pages of comments to the article, not one wholly supportive of Pre-Check.

The comments may be read here:

http://tinyurl.com/ljtwc3e

I believe the URL opens to page 2 of the comments. On page 1, you will note that the first comment is from Robert Crandell, former chair of American Airlines.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Susan Richart said...
The Wall Street Journal had an article about Pre-Check this past week. Unfortunately, it's behind a paywall and can't be read by the majority.However, there were five pages of comments to the article, not one wholly supportive of Pre-Check.The comments may be read here:
http://tinyurl.com/ljtwc3e
I believe the URL opens to page 2 of the comments. On page 1, you will note that the first comment is from Robert Crandell, former chair of American Airlines.
screen shot/DHS OIG statementApril 19, 2014 at 7:04 AM
.................

Those comments should be required reading for everyone at TSA. They detail exactly why TSA and this program are failures.

So let me see if I have it right TSA, I can sign up for TSA Pre Check if I pay extortion money for a program that is in place at less than 1/4 of all airports and can be denied at any time for no reason?

Only idiots would agree to those terms!

GSOLTSO said...

George sez - "I don't think you repeated TSA Pre✓™ enough times in this TSA Pre✓™ brilliant post about TSA Pre✓™ on the TSA Pre✓™ approved TSA Pre✓™ blog. TSA Pre✓™."

Sorry george, the next time we write an article involving TSA Pre✓™, we will endeavor to include TSA Pre✓™ more often. We understand that TSA Pre✓™ is an important subject that many people are asking questions on and we are putting out more TSA Pre✓™ articles as we move forward. Hopefully the next article about TSA Pre✓™ will include a few more references to TSA Pre✓™ in order to alleviate any confusion about TSA Pre✓™.

Susan Knisely asked - "Can TSA Pre(check)be denied?"

Yes, it can be denied, there are some automatic disqualifying factors. You can read the eligibility requirements here.

Anon sez - "An excellent program that should be mandatory for all travelers. It should require renewal every year and be self-sustaining with user fees covering costs."

TSA Pre✓™ is designed and operated as a voluntary program. I do not see that changing.

Anon sez - "I guess being on the front lines of the War on Terror leaves little time for proofreading."

This was more of a tech Gremlin that was fed after midnight than a proofreading challenge, although we miss on proofreading from time to time as well!

RB sez - "West, what was that you said about 12/24 hours?"

Even I and other members of the blog team have to take some vacation from time to time.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "West, what was that you said about 12/24 hours?"

Even I and other members of the blog team have to take some vacation from time to time.
West
TSA Blog Team
April 19, 2014 at 10:52 AM
..........................

All at the same time?

Susan Richart said...

"Even I and other members of the blog team have to take some vacation from time to time."

Puleeze, West, this has been happening for some time now, to the point where it is now SOP. The Tuesday thread is put up and there are no responses posted to it until the following weekend, after the "oh, look what we found this week" thread has gone up.

Screen shot/DHS OIG

@SkyWayManAz said...

West, thank you for you link on what can disqualify you from PreCheck. I asked Customs during my interview for Global Entry and they didn't know. The head of TSA for the airport happened to walk in and she was motioned over by them to answer my question. She said with a straight face that I was asking her questions involving national security and she could not respond. Then she made a speedy exit from the interview room. I honestly did not think it was a secret that if you had a criminal record that might get you excluded or tossed out upon conviction. I have friends that are reluctant to apply for PreCheck because they have a DUI. They thought it would be a waste of time and they'd be out the money. Now that I know that alone will not get you excluded I will direct them to your link.

Liberty Belle said...

My April 16, 2014, 6:49pm comment fully met TSA blog policy. It is April 20, 2014, 3:30pm, but my comment hasn't been approved.

Other posts from that date and time have been approved, but mine has not. Approve it or explain exactly why it was deleted, blog team.

Screenshot

Liberty Belle said...

West, the GAO debunked any claim that the one billion dollar TSA "behavior detection" boondoggle was effective.

Your assertion that people are given a freebie pass through precheck aren't a threat because of the overpaid B.D. screeners is patently false.

99.99999% of all flyers are not a threat to aviation safety. Just let people through WTMD, end the naked pic scanners, end the liquid ban, end the shoe carnival. Don't make anyone pay for it. Stop the secret background checks and FBI fingerprinting to get on a plane in America.

Screenshot

Anonymous said...

West, the entire blotter team must be in vacation frequently, based upon how often comments are delayed. Makes one think it's more about the topic or maybe the boss is not around?

RB said...

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304626304579505570417804570

"Mr. Pistole said he has heard the complaints about Precheck lanes getting clogged, and TSA has already decided to stop moving travelers 75 years of age and older into Precheck service, unless they are enrolled, because they sometimes can take 10 minutes to move through. As Precheck enrollment grows, the "managed inclusion" effort will be phased out, he said."

So TSA Administrator John S. Pistole openly admits to discriminating against the elderly.

I call for the immediate removal of John S. Pistol! This country doesn't need anyone on the federal payroll who openly admits to allowing and calling for discrimination of any kind.

Mr. Pistole, tell us, of the 1.8 million people who fly each day what percentage are aged 75 and older?

Message preserved for submission to the DHS OIG for TSA acknowledged civil rights violations.



Anonymous said...

West, why do you have time to answer questions sarcastically, but ignore a legitimate question about why you people don't just make this the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of keeping it as a perk reserved for the wealthy elite?

RB said...

Anonymous Liberty Belle said...
My April 16, 2014, 6:49pm comment fully met TSA blog policy. It is April 20, 2014, 3:30pm, but my comment hasn't been approved.

Other posts from that date and time have been approved, but mine has not. Approve it or explain exactly why it was deleted, blog team.

Screenshot

April 20, 2014 at 3:31 PM

...............
Why would you expect TSA employees to honor the United States Constitution and your First Amendment Rights?

It's not like they took and oath or anything.

Anonymous said...

I paid $100 for 5 years of Global Entry and entered my Known Traveler Number into my American Airlines AAdvantage account. Result = did _not_ get TSA Precheck on a recent American flight. (But, Precheck works fine when I fly Delta, United, and USAirways.) If membership does not guarantee 100% probability of getting Precheck every time we fly, what are we paying for?

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I paid $100 for 5 years of Global Entry and entered my Known Traveler Number into my American Airlines AAdvantage account. Result = did _not_ get TSA Precheck on a recent American flight. (But, Precheck works fine when I fly Delta, United, and USAirways.) If membership does not guarantee 100% probability of getting Precheck every time we fly, what are we paying for?

April 23, 2014 at 12:21 AM

..............................
You're paying TSA for the chance of getting Pre Check. TSA can take it from you at any time for any reason. Of course TSA Pre Check is not available at 75% of the countries airports.

I call it a scam job.

Anonymous said...

"The Wall Street Journal had an article about Pre-Check this past week. Unfortunately, it's behind a paywall and can't be read by the majority. However, there were five pages of comments to the article, not one wholly supportive of Pre-Check."

Unfortunately, many of the comments I read are more unsupportive of allowing the commoners to mix with the elites in the PreCheck line than unsupportive of PreCheck as a program. It is rather nauseating to see so many people willing to sacrifice privacy and the Fourth Amendment for a faster trip through the checkpoint--especially when the speed improvement comes partially from the subjection of the commoners to body imaging and/or frisking.

[screenshot]

Anonymous said...

I was planning on applying for pre check nrxt month but today at DFW security (C3) tsa officers were telling pre check members they could leave their shoes on but liquids, laptops, etc still had to be removed and there was no pass on body scanning. Paying $85 to keep my shoes on is an anti-perk IMO.

Anonymous said...

So why are federal civilian employees not eligible for TSA-pre as are federal military employees?

I have a federal government security ID just like the TSA employees do. I'm betting my security clearance attached to my ID is higher than theirs.

Anonymous said...

too many clumsy and clueless people are clogging up the pre lines this year. it's not speeding up their travels, but it slows everyone else down. keep the herd thin.

GSOLTSO said...

SkywaymanAZ sez - "West, thank you for you link on what can disqualify you from PreCheck"

You are quite welcome, I sincerely hope it helped out.

West
TSA Blog Team

Jill said...

Wow, you have time to sort through all of the comments to find the one or two nice ones, but you fail to approve my comment, West.

Jimmie Mac said...

West, it appears you missed wuite a few comments and questions in your last cherry-pickin' reply.

Here's another few questions: is the "blog team" list of employees (from 2008!) still accurate? Or is it just you and Curtis? Who handles the @TSA and @TSABlogTeam Twitter accts?

Anonymous said...

I have enjoyed TSA-Precheck but they need to make it so that once you are cleared for a trip, it should be for all segments. My wife and flew from HPN to DCA, both w/ Precheck. The return flight the next day - she had it and I did not. Less than two weeks later we did the same trip, but stayed a few days longer. HPN to DCA we both had Pre-check. On the return I had it and she did not. Both of these trips were on the same airline and each roundtrip was on one reservation for the two of us.

Staci said...

With concerns about air travel somewhat heightened yet again I have some real concerns. It seems that, at least at some airports, Precheck is just a suggestion. People have not gone through any "pre security check." Instead, to keep the regular line moving they pick one Precheck person and then one from the non Precheck to do the ID validation. That's done; however, they then let those people through the Precheck

Staci said...

Milwaukee is the same way. They are sloppy.

Anonymous said...

I have been given Precheck several times in the past year. But last time, even though I went through the PRE lane, I was put through the normal full body scan, remove everything procedure along with the majority of Precheck passengers. About one in four were allowed through the faster procedure.

Anonymous said...

TSA Precheck is a joke. I'm a Diamond Medallion with Delta, flying hundreds of flights every year. I have a clean record and have provided all my information to Delta to be considered for precheck. I never qualify for precheck and no one knows why, although the airline states they have given all my information to the TSA. Typical government product that does not work and for no good reason. I also routinely see people who have no idea what precheck is being ushered into the quicker precheck lanes. Total chaos.

Anonymous said...

My wife was randomly selected to go through the TSA-Pre line before we both applied and spent $85 each. Now we don't get selected. DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY. BECUASE THEY WILL.