Monday, March 10, 2014

Are You Enrolled in a Trusted Traveler Program but Have Not Received TSA Pre✓™? Here is Your Answer.



TSA Pre™, an expedited screening program now available at 117 airports nationwide has many recognized benefits.  To get these benefits, however, it is important to correctly enter and double-check your known traveler number (KTN) when booking a flight in order to get full program benefits. An incorrect entry might opt you out of TSA Pre™ on a particular flight itinerary.

We hear that some trusted travelers have not been able to enjoy the benefits of TSA Pre™ because of errors made in entering information when they book their reservation. On a given day, some have missed out on expedited screening because of a few minor errors. Here are some helpful tips:

First, when you receive your KTN, you should make sure your airline frequent flyer profile and any current and/or future reservations include the KTN. Also, please verify that the airline has your first/middle/last name and correct date of birth – it should match exactly how you applied for the trusted traveler program. For example, if you applied for a trusted traveler program as John David Doe, with David being your middle name, your airline frequent profile should not be JD Doe; it needs to be consistent – first/middle/last.

This link to the TSA website describes the probability of receiving TSA Pre™ on your next flight. Those who have a KTN will receive TSA Pre™ on a more consistent basis on all nine participating U.S. carriers.

Members of these different trusted traveler programs have been provided a KTN:
Lawful permanent residents, enrolled in a CBP program, are not yet eligible for TSA Pre™. They will be able to begin participation this summer.

A description of the different trusted traveler programs is available here. A comparison chart is also available.

You can always ask your carrier(s) to update your profile information and/or saved Secure Flight data. If you want to verify your name and/or KTN, and you are enrolled in TSA Pre™, please click here. If you are enrolled in a CBP program, please see the post from November, which describes how to verify your name and/or KTN, which CBP calls your “PASSID.”

We always recommend that when in doubt, call the carrier to verify that your Secure Flight data matches, and make any corrections. This way, the odds are in your favor that you will receive TSA Pre™ on your next flight!

Lastly, if you completed enrollment, visited an application center, and received approval for a trusted traveler program, and still have not received TSA Pre™, please contact us. Our contact center will forward your information to the appropriate personnel to research the issue.
We are here to help!

Safe travels! 

TSA Blog Team

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

Complete crap. People who have NEVER completed any forms, done interviews or paid fees are in the Pre-check line every week.

Last week I ran into a family where the KIDS were given Pre-check (and the parents not).

TSA: STOP GIVING PRECHECK TO RANDOM TRAVELERS!!!!!

Lyle B. said...

But as of this past week, TSA personnell (screeners) are still not abreast of this policy, nor are they aware that iPads do not need to come out of a carry-on.

Anonymous said...

But, as of last week, TSA personnel (screeners) are not abreast of this policy, nor are they aware that iPads do not need to come out of carry-ons.

RB said...

Everyone should be screened using Pre Check level screening elevating only if cause is shown. The continued shoe and liquid carnival earns TSA nothing but bad will.

Bubba said...

Why not screen everyone using PreCheck standards? That is the way it is done abroad, including for flights coming into the US (and none of the blew up!). The fact that Pre exists demonstrates that these standards of primary screening are what is necessary, not more. Stop the madness of body scanners and shoe removal!

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. Citizenship and background investigations are not required to be active duty in the military, so if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.

Anonymous said...

Why were the operating hours of the TSA Pre-Check locations removed from the website?

Anonymous said...

There sure are lots of rules to play by in this extortion scheme.

Anonymous said...

"TSA: STOP GIVING PRECHECK TO RANDOM TRAVELERS!!!!!"

It is very sad that you would have others' privacy violated via body scans and/or gropes just so that you can save a few minutes at a checkpoint.

"I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations..."

I continue to ask why your pet group presents less risk than teachers, librarians, 13-year old kids, farmers, physicians, etc. By all means provide some data to justify why Group X presents less risk than Group Y--and please share that data with TSA, since TSA does not acknowledge having any such data.

screenshot

Anonymous said...

Pathetic. Why is this not the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of a perk reserved for the elite, wealthy few?

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. Citizenship and background investigations are not required to be active duty in the military, so if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.

March 11, 2014 at 7:43 AM

...........................................................
These and many other questions go unanswered (ignored) by TSA's Blogger Bob.

What kind of security allows an unproven BDO program to select a person for lessor screening? Is that Risk Based or just an uneducated guess?

Why do some people pony up $85 dollars only to see people who paid nothing get the same screening?

Why is 20 plus years provable military service not enough to rate Pre Check yet someone who has been in the military for just weeks gets Pre Check?

Better questions, how can TSA continue squandering millions of dollars on the BDO program when GAO has proven beyond a doubt that TSA's BDO do no better than a person just guessing?

I honestly believe that TSA has no concept of security or how to conduct security screening and I think TSA proves this lack of understanding everyday in our airports and even on this very blog.

Anonymous said...

Pre Check should be the standard for all passengers unless their is suspicion to justify additional screening. You could still pull people aside for additional screening at random.

At the very least, you should end shoe removal. Most of the rest of the world stopped requiring it and their flights seem just as safe. Also, there are too many exemptions to the policy that quite a few groups don't have to remove their shoes.

RB said...

I continue to ask why your pet group presents less risk than teachers, librarians, 13-year old kids, farmers, physicians, etc. By all means provide some data to justify why Group X presents less risk than Group Y--and please share that data with TSA, since TSA does not acknowledge having any such data.

screenshot

March 11, 2014 at 8:58 AM

......................................
Let me attempt to answer this.

A person traveling in military uniform that just completed boot camp would be eligible for Pre Check based on current TSA policy.

A person that had retired from military service after a 20+ year career would not be eligible if in civilian clothes.

Which person of the two examples from above have more history with the government? I suggest that the retired service member. These people will have demonstrated over a long period of time that they obey the law, try to do the best they can for country and represent little to no risk to commercial aviation.

But the person just finishing boot camp could have as little as 6 1/2 weeks of military service (Air Force). How does that make the person eligible for less screening?

Given these two choices I know who I would give greater trust to but TSA does it exactly opposite.

I have said before that I would give Pre Check to police, fire, and most other government employees. I think these groups represent little risk to commercial aviation which is what TSA's Managed Inclusion is suppose to do.

Problem is that TSA has no concept on how to implement such programs.

Look how badly TSA has bungled Pre Check so far.

tramky said...

If the Malaysia Air situation turns out to be an act of terrorism, what will THAT say about the global security regime of which TSA is a part? My god, an entire huge airplane and all its passengers and crew just GONE!

Has there been a search of any and all airfields in Malaysia where this place COULD have landed? The lack of information about this incident is breathtaking.

As for this program every native-born American citizen without a criminal record should be in PreCheck. And NO foreign-born passenger should be in that program. These details DO make a difference.

Nick O. said...

Does the blotter team and TSAnonymous employees who post here want all Americans to submit to background checks, fingerprinting, and pay an unreguated fee to be able to travel in America?

Is anyone not willing to submit to these "trusted traveler" programs automatically untrustworthy and suspect of terrorist or criminal activity in your minds?

Anonymous said...

Do not forget about domestic terrorism when deciding who is eligible for PreCheck and who is not, and do not ignore the fact that military training can only be an asset for a terrorist.

From http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2013/04/the-greater-danger-military-trained-right-wing-extremists/275277/:

"Right-wing extremists are more likely than violent Islamist extremists--or, as they are sometimes called, jihadists--to have military experience. They are also better armed, and are responsible for more incidents. The past two decades have seen multiple attacks from right-wing extremist veterans, from Wade Michael Page, who trained at Fort Bragg, to the group of former and active-duty soldiers in Georgia, who collected weapons to carry out a plan to assassinate President Obama. In 2011, Kevin Harpham, who had served in the army, placed a bomb along the route of a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade. During the 1990s, violent extremism in the militia movement and other right-wing movements relied heavily upon those who served in the military. Timothy McVeigh, the perpetrator of the most deadly terrorist attack on American soil before 9/11, was a military veteran whose libertarian views were also heavily influenced by a novel by a former American Nazi Party official. Eric Rudolph, the anti-abortion extremist who bombed the 1996 Olympics, had also enlisted in the army."

Ross said...

Everyone needs to realize the TSA can deny you their precious precheck status for ANY reason, and they don't have to tell you why, hiding behind the secrecy level they created to hid all of their policies and procedures.

The reason you are denied precheck could have absolutely nothing to do with terorism or being a threat to aviation safety. It could have nothing to do with weapons, explosives, or incendiaries - which are the ONLY things the TSA is assigned to search for in their screening areas.

According to TSA's own precheck policy, they could decide you don't get precheck because one day you had a disagreement with one of their employees. Not a fight. Not a crimial offense. Just a disagreement.

Even more, they can deny you precheck if you have a disagreement with an AIRLINE employee. The government will take your moeny, search your private background, take your fingerprints and deny you a government program for disagreeing with a private company employee.

*screenshot taken*

Anonymous said...

If you belong to Global Entry, are you automatically enrolled in TSA Pre-check?

Anonymous said...

I am confused. I had a Precheck entry on my boarding pass. When I arrived at the Pre lane, some passengers were directed to the expedited procedure, but most (including myself)were directed through the standard procedure (which had a line) even though the lane and baggage checker was labeled TSA PRE. These passengers were also checked by the full body scanner, requiring removal of all the usual items. In other words, there was no difference between how these PRE passengers were handled and the standard procedure. Does the individual agent determine this? One man who expected to be expedited nearly missed his flight.