Friday, February 28, 2014

TSA Week in Review – 36 Firearms Discovered This Week (29 Loaded)



Loaded Firearm Discovered in Carry-on Bag at Amarillo (AMA)
Loaded Firearm Discovered in Carry-on Bag at Amarillo (AMA)
36 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 36 firearms, 29 were loaded and 11 had rounds chambered. See a complete list and more photos at the bottom of this post.
 
Grenades Discovered at (L-R) BWI and MCI
Grenades Discovered at (L-R) BWI and MCI
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. - We continue to find inert hand grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a realistic bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays in checkpoint screening. While they may be novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane. Read here on why inert items cause problems.
  • Three inert grenades were discovered this week at Baltimore (BWI), Minneapolis (MSP), and Kansas City (MCI).

Knife Concealed in Bag of Chips (LBB), Knife Under Pull Handle (BTR), Knife Sewn Into Lining of Purse (IAH)
Knife Concealed in Bag of Chips (LBB), Knife Under Pull Handle (BTR), Knife Sewn Into Lining of Purse (IAH)
Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure no prohibited items are inside. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and quite possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 
  • Nine credit card knives were discovered this week. Four at Kansas City (MCI), two at Albuquerque (ABQ), and the remainder were discovered at Colorado Springs (COS), Cincinnati (CVG), and Fresno (FAT).
  • A belt buckle knife was discovered at Los Angeles (LAX).
  • A belt buckle knife was discovered at Boise (BOI).
  • A knife was detected in the lining of the carry-on bag at Baton Rouge (BTR).
  • A knife was discovered sewn into the lining of a purse at Houston (IAH).
  • A pocket knife was discovered rolled up in a potato chip bag with a lighter at Amarillo (AMA).

Belt Buckle Knives Discovered at (T-B) BOI and LAX
Belt Buckle Knives Discovered at (T-B) BOI and LAX
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items - In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, Airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, and a lot of sharp pointy things…

 
Throwing Stars and Knives (ANC), Bullet Knife (FLL), Dagger (OMA)
Throwing Stars and Knives (ANC), Bullet Knife (FLL), Dagger (OMA)
Arrows (PHX), Starter Pistol (ONT), Credit Card Knife (MCI)
Arrows (PHX), Starter Pistol (ONT), Credit Card Knife (MCI)
Stun Guns20 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Four were discovered at Las Vegas (LAS), two at Oklahoma City (OKC), two at San Francisco (SFO), and the remainder were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), Burbank (BUR), Detroit (DTW), Dawson (GDV), Washington Dulles (IAD), Jacksonville (JAX), Lubbock (LBB), Kansas City (MCI), Melbourne (MLB), Oakland (OAK), Punta Gorda (PGD), and San Jose (SJC).

Firearms Discovered This Week in Carry-On Bags 

Firearms Discovered at (L-R / T-B) BTR, HOU, PHX, SAT, TRI
Firearms Discovered at (L-R / T-B) BTR, HOU, PHX, SAT, TRI

36 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 36 firearms, 29 were loaded and 11 had rounds chambered.
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, date is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear, or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the throughput is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500.00. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our post highlighting the dangerous, scary, and downright unusual items our officers found in 2012. The 2011 list can be found here.

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If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

21 comments:

Barbara said...

Every week I get this post, and every week I am shocked by how much people try to sneak on board our planes! I FULLY understand and support TSAs job. I often wear long skirts, and so I often get patted down. It has always been done respectfully and by a female. I don't mind one bit! And I won't mind even MORE because I've been reading these posts! Bravo to TSA for being vigilant!

RB said...

Picture labeled as grenades discovered demonstrate the complete dishonesty of this blog. They may be shaped like a WW2 type grenade but that is where any sembelence to a real grenade ends. Credibility once lost is very hard to regain. Bob you have no credibility.

Anonymous said...

what a very dumb way to lose a good gun! keep up the good work guys!

Bubba said...

Yet another week in which none of the objects found required a full body scanner. In fact, body scanners are WORSE at detecting guns than metal detectors, because they only alarm at objects on the front and back surface of the body.

Why are you still using these expensive, invasive, slow ad ineffective machines?

Anonymous said...

Trying real hard to get the "TSA employees are not physicians and do not have medical training, but are allowed to pretend they do at the airport" off the front page of the blog as fast as you can???

Anonymous said...

Not vigilant, just repetitive.

Let me also be repetitive.

12,000,000 people flew last week on 210,000 flights.

These alleged "36 weapons" means that a mere .0003% of flyers, NOT terrorists, allegedly tried to carry a "weapon" on .017% of flights.

All of these alleged finds would have occurred through x-ray baggage screening and walk-through metal detectors. No naked pic scanners needed.

SP said...

To RB: Perhaps if you would "read here on why inert items cause problems" below the picture that you refer to, you would understand why these items are not allowed and why it slows the process. Yes, credibility is hard to regain and you have lost yours. Bob, keep up the good work.

Anonymous said...

How many false positives did the naked body scanners have? How many people had to be groped by screeners because the naked body scanners can't distinguish between pleats and explosives?

RB said...

SP said...
To RB: Perhaps if you would "read here on why inert items cause problems" below the picture that you refer to, you would understand why these items are not allowed and why it slows the process. Yes, credibility is hard to regain and you have lost yours. Bob, keep up the good work.

March 3, 2014 at 8:46 AM

........................
I didn't question why these items are not allowed. My comment noted that once again TSA lied about the nature of the item in the photo caption.

An item shaped like a grenade is not a grenada unless it is functional. Even TSA types should be smart enough to understand that simple fact.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for keeping America safe. I have to travel in the USA with large amounts of cash. I work with classic car purchasing and sellers are afraid of fraudulent payments. How much cash can I carry on domestic flights? I don't want to get in trouble.

Anonymous said...

"...I often wear long skirts, and so I often get patted down.... I don't mind one bit! And I won't mind even MORE because I've been reading these posts!..."

What you are saying is that YOU should be thoroughly patted down even though you DO NOT HAVE a weapon, explosive, or incendiary on you. How does that make sense?

Myself, I have NO plans to harm other passengers, and I have done NOTHING to justify a government actor putting his/her hands on me or generating an image of my unclothed body. The burden of proof is NOT on me: That is what "innocent until proven guilty" means.

Volunteer for a patdown if it makes you feel better (though I think that is senseless). However, that mindset is what sustains wasteful counterterrorism spending, feeds the U.S. culture of fear, and contributes to continued 4th Amendment violations at U.S. airport security checkpoints.

Anonymous said...

If a person has a Bitcoin account is he allowed to travel? I understand people are being stopped.

Anonymous said...

Whether the item was described correctly or not does not even matter. It is the mere fact that people still use no common sense when traveling. Why? A threat whether it is obvious or not on the computer screen is still a threat until cleared. A fake item will still affect the screening process and slow things down until it can be determined that it was a fake. People stop packing stuff like guns and inert objects that may appear to pose a threat. Use your brain, enough is not enough, time to wake up and stop wasting everyone's time.

Anonymous said...

For the uninformed people out there, the full body scanners that are "now" being used do not take images of your naked body. That is unless your naked body looks like this https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTr4Ey6uAk8gpkS5NSTWZC40XS4bfGywUXc2YORaIyfj4k1kQ3L Also, those scanners can detect items along your side. Also the comment about the machine not distinguishing between a pleat and an explosive is the reason why there is someone there to pat down the area shown. If you don't agree with the machine get a pat down, or make a machine of your own that can magically tell what is on your body.

GSOLTSO said...

Barbara sez - "I FULLY understand and support TSAs job."

We appreciate the support Barbara, please come back and post again!

Anon sez - "How much cash can I carry on domestic flights?"

You can carry unlimited amounts of cash with you on domestic flights (subject to the limitations of size that the individual airlines post). People travel with large amounts of cash all the time. If you are traveling internationally, there are different requirements that pertain to carrying large amounts of cash. You can find the regulations covering international travel with large amounts here.

Anon sez - "If a person has a Bitcoin account is he allowed to travel?"

Yes.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

"For the uninformed people out there, the full body scanners that are 'now' being used do not take images of your naked body."

No. They only changes made were (a) removal of the backscatter-type scanners and (b) installation of a "privacy filter" to create the stick figure image. The machines are still capable of generating the same images that led to calls for the privacy filter in the first place. The machines can still store the data. There is still no oversight to ensure the security of the data.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"For the uninformed people out there, the full body scanners that are "now" being used do not take images of your naked body"

Actually, read the RFP for the scanners. According to those, not only do they take naked pictures, but they can store them and transmit them. The only reason you get a gumby outline is because of software. The underlying image that the outline is based on, however, is still there.

"Also, those scanners can detect items along your side"

Proof please.

"Also the comment about the machine not distinguishing between a pleat and an explosive is the reason why there is someone there to pat down the area shown."

Then why an invasive patdown of areas that did NOT alarm? Also, the number of false positives cause even more slowdown.

" If you don't agree with the machine get a pat down, or make a machine of your own that can magically tell what is on your body."

So, my choice is to submit to an untested, potentially unsafe, virtual strip search (a violation of basic human rights, not to mention the US Constitution), or a sexual assault. And even if I submit, I still might be sexually assaulted? Not much of a choice.

Bob said...

Why weren't my comments allowed?

They were sent early March 10, and at least three comments posted after mine were approved.

My comments were in response to comments by an anonymous employee and met comment policies.

This looks like a personal vendetta by the blotter team.

*screenshot*

Anonymous said...

Provide proof that the scanner cannot detect items on the side If you want to test it try next time you fly.

As for sexual assault I suggest you read up on its definition. It may be unwanted touching in your opinion but there is no sexual motive.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"Provide proof that the scanner cannot detect items on the side If you want to test it try next time you fly."

No need. It's been proven already. If you want to claim otherwise, it's up to you to provide the proof.

"As for sexual assault I suggest you read up on its definition. It may be unwanted touching in your opinion but there is no sexual motive."

Talk to a psychologist sometime. There is rarely sexual motive in sexual assault, either. It's about exerting one's control and power over another. Hmmm... Sounds exactly like what the TSA is doing to me. Because it certainly doesn't have anything to do with security.

Layman definition of sexual assault is the unwanted touching of one's private parts. The TSA grope qualifies.

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous asked for proof that one can get something through MMW by placing it on the side of the body:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olEoc_1ZkfA

From Jason Harrington re whole body scanning: "“They’re s***,” he said, shrugging. He said we wouldn’t be able to distinguish plastic explosives from body fat and that guns were practically invisible if they were turned sideways in a pocket."

There doesn't have to be a sexual motive for unwanted touching to be sexual abuse or abuse; all it has to be is coerced unwanted touching.

TSA coerces travelers every day: do this or you won't fly.

Further, TSA refuses to publish an exact description of either the enhanced or resolution "pat down" procedures, claiming they are SSI. A passenger cannot consent to that which they do not know, thereby adding to the coercion.

Sadly, TSA has made it virtually impossible to get any complaints about sexual touching in front of the courts.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement