Tuesday, January 14, 2014

TSA Travel Tips Tuesday: Lost & Found



http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/airport-lost-found-contacts

Items are frequently left behind at TSA checkpoints, whether from seasoned travelers or first-time fliers. I can attest that it is an empty feeling when you realize that you left something behind, especially when you realize it at 30,000 feet in the air.

This week’s tip is a common sense one, often overlooked in the sometimes hustle and bustle of travel -- bookmark the TSA lost and found page. If you do leave an item behind, the page has all of the contact numbers for TSA lost & found offices at all airports. It’s important to remember that these numbers are only for items that were left at TSA checkpoints. If you are missing an item in the ticketing or gate area, you’ll need to contact your airline or the airport. 

Here are a couple of other blog posts about TSA Lost & Found: 


See you next Tuesday with more travel tips! 

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram! 

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team 

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

26 comments:

Anonymous said...

I AM CURIOUS, HOW A $30,000 WATCH LOOKS LIKE?

Anonymous said...

If people weren´t required to remove shoes, and everything from their bodies for the full body scanner (and not only metal like the good old days), there would be a lot less left behind.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "I AM CURIOUS, HOW A $30,000 WATCH LOOKS LIKE?"

Check out the page below, the pricing ranges from somewhere around $3,000 to a high of over $380,000 that I saw during a quick perusal. I start to sweat and hem and haw when I have to spend more than $30 on a watch, I can't imagine having one worth $30k... I would probably sell it and buy me a new car!

http://www.finestwatches.com/patek-philippe.html

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

Would there be more or less items at lost and founds if you didn't use worthless naked body scanners that require everyone to remove everything from their pockets?

tramky said...

And what about the small pocketknife and pair of hair scissors that were stolen by TSA agents--in the first case a TSA supervisor? They would use the term relinquished or confiscated contraband. But whatever you call it, my personal property, very useful to me for years, was taken by government agents. Why can't one get such items back? Such items should essentially be 'checked' much like a hat check operation, and available for pickup in baggage claim upon the return of the passenger to the same airport. And other arrangements for returning checkpoint contraband can be made.

But it is "we're taking it from you and you ain't gettin' it back." THIS is not America.

Since the thoughtless implementation of the TSA and its security protocols rendered most airport terminals functionally obsolete--checked bags go in first LONG before security checkpoints, making access to checked baggage as an option for dealing with checkpoint contraband impossible, not to mention the awkward physical arrangement of airline terminals with security checkpoints shoehorned into areas NEVER part of the architect's vision and design for activities with such human density, equipment, furniture and other spaces for personnel.

Every hour of every day the Islamic terrorists win and affect my life and that of countless others.

Save the ends justify the means argument--that has become the government littany.




Anonymous said...

tramky said:
"And what about the small pocketknife and pair of hair scissors that were stolen by TSA agents--in the first case a TSA supervisor? They would use the term relinquished or confiscated contraband. But whatever you call it, my personal property, very useful to me for years, was taken by government agents. Why can't one get such items back? Such items should essentially be 'checked' much like a hat check operation, and available for pickup in baggage claim upon the return of the passenger to the same airport. And other arrangements for returning checkpoint contraband can be made.

But it is "we're taking it from you and you ain't gettin' it back." THIS is not America.

Since the thoughtless implementation of the TSA and its security protocols rendered most airport terminals functionally obsolete--checked bags go in first LONG before security checkpoints, making access to checked baggage as an option for dealing with checkpoint contraband impossible, not to mention the awkward physical arrangement of airline terminals with security checkpoints shoehorned into areas NEVER part of the architect's vision and design for activities with such human density, equipment, furniture and other spaces for personnel.

Every hour of every day the Islamic terrorists win and affect my life and that of countless others.

Save the ends justify the means argument--that has become the government littany."
i believe that the tsa tried to implement a new prohibited items list that allowed small knives but it was turned down by numberous entites including the flight attendants union. i am curious as to if there were signs posted in front of the security area that told you that the knife was not allowed? if not then i can see why you would think that such an item was allowed. i think that it is rational for the government to hold onto items that are not allowed so that they can spend time and money cataloging such items and these areas should be staffed 24/7 so that whenever you come back that they are available to provide you with the item that was not allowed in the first place. imagine that after 12 or so years of the tsa manning the security areas that people would not realize that knives are not allowed. its the tsas fault for not gettting hte message out. as a matter of fact people should not be required to know what is in their bags or on their person at any time, its too much effort and the tsa should be more responsible for what people dont know that they have.

Anonymous said...

anon said:
"If people weren´t required to remove shoes, and everything from their bodies for the full body scanner (and not only metal like the good old days), there would be a lot less left behind."

i would like to know if more or less items are being left behind at airports since the tsa took over. does anyone have any informaiton. i am sure that it is more WAY more, as the tsa is evil.

Anonymous said...

The difference is those items were simply forgotten. You were told not to bring pocket knives and scissors on the airplane when you bought your ticket. Any airline ticket I have purchased in the last 11 or so years had in some way included a banned items list . so stop thinking you are special and exempt from the rules that everyone else is following .

RB said...

A much larger problem than lost items is the ongoing thefts of peoples property by TSA employees.

Convicted TSA Officer Reveals Secrets of Thefts at Airports

"A convicted TSA security officer says he was part of a "culture" of indifference that allowed corrupt employees to prey on passengers' luggage and personal belongings with impunity, thanks to lax oversight and tip-offs from TSA colleagues."

The flying public has a greater chance to suffer a loss at the hands of TSA than they do from terrorists. I guess that makes TSA a terrorist organization as far as the public is concerned.

Things have gotten so bad for travelers that even Congress is making moves to return all screening functions to non-government workers, and it's about time. The public has suffered long enough at the hands of TSA and the unprofessional screeners in our airports.

Lawmakers threaten TSA with private screeners

Susan Richart said...

Hey, Bob, what about the supervisor at Charlotte who was fired for stealing from lost and found. I don't see mention of that in your article.

screen shot/DHS OIG

Susan Richart said...

FYI, the new fiscal budget requires the TSA to have at least 50% of passengers eligible to expedited screening by the end of 2014 and 25% eligible by mid-April of this year.

Of course, that doesn't mean that 50% of passengers will get expedited screening because, of course, the TSA has to keep those terrorists on their toes.

Sadly, Congress should have written the legislation to state that 50% of passengers MUST get expedited screening.

So write your Congresspeople and demand a change in wording.

screen shot/DHS OIG

RB said...

Anonymous said...
The difference is those items were simply forgotten. You were told not to bring pocket knives and scissors on the airplane when you bought your ticket. Any airline ticket I have purchased in the last 11 or so years had in some way included a banned items list . so stop thinking you are special and exempt from the rules that everyone else is following .

January 15, 2014 at 11:52 AM

.............................

I have never received a list of banned items when purchasing an airline ticket. Can you tell us what airline(s) you normally fly on?

And no one is told not to bring scissors. From the TSA.Gov web page:

"Scissors - metal with pointed tips and blades shorter than 4 inches are allowed,"

So by complying with TSA rules I can bring a scissor with to sharp pointed blades but I cannot bring my Old timer with a two inch blade.

Like everything else TSA many of these rules make no sense.

Anonymous said...

Interesting timing of this post. There was a news report today of a TSA SUPERVISOR caught stealing things from Lost-and-Found: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/01/15/4613220/tsa-supervisor-at-charlotte-douglas.html#.UtcJ7rZgPfY

Bubba said...

West,

Since you seem capable of answering questions about expensive watches with external links to commercial websites, how about answering about the effectiveness of the full body scanners, as has been questioned here by myself and others repeatedly?

Your weekly data pretty much these machines are not effective, in addition to being slow, demeaning, invasive and expensive. Why do you still use them, then?

I think that is a much more important question to answer to the flying public than providing examples of expensive watches.

@SkyWayManAz said...

RB said...

"Things have gotten so bad for travelers that even Congress is making moves to return all screening functions to non-government workers, and it's about time."

TSA has had a dozen years to address these concerns and they don't seem to be interested. Instead they've condoned and embraced an atmosphere of confrontation with the public. Any concerns the public has over mistreatment at the checkpoint can turn into retaliation. When you justify barking orders at the publics that makes it easy to dismiss complaints, including difficult to prove theft allegations thereby encouraging more theft. All proper procedures were followed, unless the passenger has their own video to prove otherwise. Hopefully Congress will act as TSA has failed miserably to fix their shortcomings.

Anonymous said...

rb said:
"I guess that makes TSA a terrorist organization as far as the public is concerned.
"
please site a reference and no the internet does not count as you have stated before. please provide where the public views tsa as a terroist organization. if you cannot provide a reference then state this as your opinion. i would like the person that is about to undergo trial for shooting and killing one tsa officer if he would utilize the blog and if his opinion of tsa was in some way determined by the blog. if so then i say remove it.

RB said...

Since TSA claims to be a professional, dedicated, and hard working organization why can't the TSA Blog Team post comments in a timely fashion?

Chris Boyce said...

Wow! What a coincidence!

http://tinyurl.com/ncj6vb6

"A recently-fired superviser with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is in custody on a misdemeanor larceny charge in connection with the theft of an iPad from Charlotte-Douglas' lost and found.

WCNC/NBC Charlotte reports that police identified him as 33-year-old Angel Fransico Caban. Caban was recently promoted to supervisor at the airport and was fired after police found an iPad that was left in the airport's lost and found.

Police told the station they recovered the alleged stolen iPad from inside Caban's home. For months police said they received reports about items passengers had left behind that had gone missing from the lost and found area. They launched an investigation, which eventually led them to Caban's home."

GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "Since TSA claims to be a professional, dedicated, and hard working organization why can't the TSA Blog Team post comments in a timely fashion?"

As explained before, the blog is only part of the blog team members jobs. Very rarely does a posting go past 48 hours without being reviewed (and then it is usually when there is vacation going on). This comment was approved in less than 24 hours.What suggestions do you have to change the process?

West
TSA Blog Team

GSOLTSO said...

Bubba sez - "
Since you seem capable of answering questions about expensive watches with external links to commercial websites, how about answering about the effectiveness of the full body scanners, as has been questioned here by myself and others repeatedly?"

I have not responded because most of the information about AIT has been posted here on the blog and on TSAs main site. For more information on the AIT, see the following links:


http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/advanced-imaging-technology-ait

http://www.tsa.gov/ait-frequently-asked-questions

http://blog.tsa.gov/2010/03/advanced-imaging-technology-yes-its.html

http://blog.tsa.gov/2013/01/body-scanner-resolution-rooms-conduct.html

As for the effectiveness of the AIT, the machine gives us the best opportunity to discover non-metallic as well as metallic items on a passengers person - which means it can find more items than a metal detector. While we may not see many cases where dangerous items are found with AIT, it can act as a deterrent.

West
TSA Blog Team

Susan Richart said...

West, the very fact that this blog publishes a weekly list of guns and knives found at checkpoints proves that neither AIT nor WTMD is a deterrent, especially when we know that at least as many guns and knives as are found get through checkpoints and on to aircraft.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...Rb sez - "Since TSA claims to be a professional, dedicated, and hard working organization why can't the TSA Blog Team post comments in a timely fashion?"
...............................................
As explained before, the blog is only part of the blog team members jobs. Very rarely does a posting go past 48 hours without being reviewed (and then it is usually when there is vacation going on). This comment was approved in less than 24 hours.What suggestions do you have to change the process?WestTSA Blog TeamJanuary 18, 2014
at 4:54 AM

................................

For starters TSA could end the illegal censorship of peoples comments. The Constitution and legal history is clear that government (TSA) cannot inftinge on free speech. Those government employees who work with the TSA Blog are clearly guilty of these violations and should be prosecuted and removed from government service.

Second, there is no reason that comments cannot be posted daily if not more often.

If TSA is going to squander our tax dollars on a worthless blog then do it right.

Bubba said...

So West, basically your answer is that your data don´t show effectiveness, but you still believe in it. Or at least you believe it may act as a deterrent (also without any data to show that).

Sorry, but belief is not enough here. In order to justify this level of funding, inconvenience and invasiveness to innocent people, you need to show hard data.

Anonymous said...

Scissors with 4" blades or less are allowed. Go back & read your SOP, TSAnonymous.

Anonymous said...

No, West. 48 hrs is a minimum in most cases. It's taken up to a week for a comment to appear.

If you are a team, then work out a better schedule of blog maintenance.

Many comments meeting TSA comment rules are never approved. Check out the Spanish/Kids post for proof.

Heck, check out how few comments are approved for most posts!

Anonymous said...

Why do you want to restrict the First Amendment, TSAnonymous? (I think that's what you were saying. It is hard to tell.