Friday, August 16, 2013

TSA Week in Review: 32 Firearms Discovered Last Week (24 Loaded)



 
Loaded Guns Discovered at (L-R) JNU & ECP
Loaded Guns Discovered at (L-R) JNU & ECP
32 Firearms Discovered Last Week – Of the 32 firearms, 24 were loaded and 11 had rounds chambered. See a complete list and more photos at the bottom of this post.

Stun Guns –14 stun guns were discovered last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Four were discovered at Denver (DEN), two at Las Vegas (LAS), two at Baltimore (BWI), and one each at Anchorage (ANC), Chattanooga (CHA), San Francisco (SFO), San Juan (SJU), Atlanta (ATL), and Seattle (SEA).

Stun Guns Discovered At (L-R) ATL, CHA, DEN, DEN, DEN, DEN, LAS, SEA, SFO
Stun Guns Discovered At (L-R) ATL, CHA, DEN, DEN, DEN, DEN, LAS, SEA, SFO
Items in the Strangest Places –It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure no prohibited items are inside. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag, you could be cited and quite possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from the past week where prohibited items were found in strange places.

  • A credit card knife was discovered at Albuquerque (ABQ).

Throwing Knives (LAX), Throwing Star (SNA), Bullet Knife (LGA)
Throwing Knives (LAX), Throwing Star (SNA), Bullet Knife (LGA)
Survival Knive and Asp (PBI), Credit Card Knife (ABQ), Kitchen Knife (DEN)
Survival Knive and Asp (PBI), Credit Card Knife (ABQ), Kitchen Knife (DEN)
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items - In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our Officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, Airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, and a lot of sharp pointy things… 
 
Airsoft Gun LGB
Airsoft Gun (LGB)
Airsoft Guns – Three Airsoft guns were discovered in carry-on baggage last week at Long Beach (LGB), Minneapolis St. Paul (MSP), and Seattle (SEA). Airsoft guns are prohibited in carry-on bags, but allowed in checked baggage. Read this post for more information: TSA Travel Tips Tuesday: Traveling with Airsoft Guns
 
                                     Firearms Discovered Last Week in Carry-On Bags
Loaded Guns
Guns Discovered At (L-R) MAF, DEN, BNA, IAH, CMH, RNO, PIT, FAY
Guns Discovered At (L-R) PHX, SAT, RNO
32 Firearms Discovered Last Week – Of the 32 firearms, 24 were loaded and 11 had rounds chambered.
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the throughput is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500.00. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, I compile my data from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly (increase) from what I report in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear, or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will not be estimates.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our post highlighting the dangerous, scary, and downright unusual items our officers found in 2012. The 2011 list can be found here.

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If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

28 comments:

Anonymous said...

1,700,000 pax per day x 7 days = 11,900,000. Some are repeat flyers, so I'll be generous and round it down to 11,000,000.

TSA misses 7 out of 10 weapons that pass through screening, so if you found 32, then another 70 or so weapons were on board flights, but were not threats to aviation safety. Let's be generous (for once) to the flying public and say a total of 100 weapons were brought through screening.

Percent of passengers who perhaps should have been stopped to make sure they were complying with state and federal weapons laws: .0009%

No terrorists found. No planes fell from the sky because there was no threat in the first place.

The TSA unnecessarily searched 10,999,900 people last week and violated the privacy and rights of those 10,999,900 people.

Think about it, will you? Please?

Aug 16, 2013 7:35pm Eastern

Anonymous said...

And, as always, nothing found with the naked body scanners.

Anonymous said...

Every time I pass through an airport checkpoint I am sad for our country. The TSA is a national disgrace.

Anonymous said...

If the TSA inspections stop even one hijacking of an airliner then it is worth the invasion of privacy.

Anonymous said...

"If the TSA inspections stop even one hijacking of an airliner then it is worth the invasion of privacy."

Will you submit to a body cavity search to demonstrate your confidence in your statement about the relative value of privacy and security?

Anonymous said...

All of these items can be found by a metal detector. So why do we have whole body imagers taking photos under our clothes?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...If the TSA inspections stop even one hijacking of an airliner then it is worth the invasion of privacy.August 17, 2013 at 11:08 AM

No, it is not. The passengers' wasted hours from every unnecessary search these past 13 years is staggering, in the hundreds of billions. This is time away from work and family.

The cost to American taxpayers so far is over $100 billion for this bloated agency.

Property lost, damaged, and stolen by screeners runs into the millions of dollars. A "few bad apples" who steal, intentionally break, and intentionally dump liquid and powder contents in passengers' baggage take and ruin our personal property, with no workable recourse. Report it? Sure, but nothing will be done to the screeners for a long time while they continue the thefts and breakage, and the TSA won't reimburse us for our property.

The assaults on our bodies, property, rights, and property under the guise of screening is beyond unaccetable. It's criminal and unconstitutional.

Hundreds of billions of dollars is not an acceptable cost to prevent one hijacking. In the US, a hijacker is likely to be severly injured by other passengers, and he can't access the cockpit anyway.

August 18, 2013 11:22AM Eastern

Screenshot

Anonymous said...

I wonder if you would think it was all worth it if the hijacking/bombing it prevented was the flight YOU were on...hmmmmm?

Comparing the screening process to a body cavity search is ridiculous. 90 percent of passengers are never touched, 99 percent of those who are patted down do not receive a full body pat down, unless they opt out of the scanner.


The cockpit doors have been hardened, and it's doubtful there could be another takeover like what occurred on 9/11 without the passengers interceding. The weapons they used would indeed be found by a metal detector. Terrorists have demonstrated their ingenuity trying to get around that by using explosives instead, as in the shoe bomber, the underwear bomber and the UK sports drink plot. Also look up Bojinka. The metal detector will never find any explosive secreted on the body, since they are not metals. That's why the body scanners were developed and the liquids we bring on the plane are limited.

I say lets have two lanes at every checkpoint. One lane for those who get it, and the other for all you whiners who don't want to be "raped" by having you body scanned or who can't figure out how to take you laptop out of your bag. That way I don't have to wait behind you while you make your point, or fumble though because you couldn't be bothered to read any signs or follow any verbal cues.

Sorry if that sounds a little mean-spirited, but the way I see it, the TSA is not the problem behind the hassle of getting through security at he airport.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"If the TSA inspections stop even one hijacking of an airliner then it is worth the invasion of privacy."

Except, they don't. And due to the illusion of security, not to mention the increased highway travel, are responsible for making travel LESS safe, not more. They are nowhere near the cost, in annual budget, lost time, or increased fatalities on the road.

Anonymous said...

TSAnonymous said...I wonder if you would think it was all worth it if the hijacking/bombing it prevented was the flight YOU were on...hmmmmm?

No, I would not. Even if I was on a hijacked plane, it would not be worth the hundreds of bilions of dollars wasted and what even you admit is an "invasion of privacy." See, I'm not that selfish nor do I think I'm that special that millions of lives must be disrupted to keep up an illusion of safety.

Also, none of the examples you (and your TSA bretheren & apologists) always bring up were viable threats. The shoe guy and the unworkable liquid plot weren't even on flights originating in the US, so the TSA's lame rules wouldn't have meant a darn thing.

If you want an I'M SCARED! lane for you so the rest of us can go through a WTMD, leave our shoes on, laptops in our bag, and not be assaulted, that would be great. All of us would be happy and all of us would arrive safely, because the TSA is security theater.

And you know the nudiescope scanners have a failure rate of over 50%. That usually means innocent flyers are touched by a stranger, sometimes on the flyers' genitals, breasts, and buttocks. Also, the scanners can't see inside a body, so your claim that they are needed is false.

Finally, thank you for agreeing that the cockpit door is hardened, so a hijacker could not gain access to the cockpit. And that the passengers wouldn't meekly comply with an attempted hijacking.

Anonymous said...

Bob, the most recent post, by a Lauren Smith, clearly violates the commenting policy of, "We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly 'off topic' or that promote services or products." Did you not look at the link?

Someone on the social media team sleeping on the job?

Anonymous said...

No shame in carrying a firearm Lauren--just don't try to carry it through the screening checkpoint please. There are plenty of roses in this country, and because I am a retired AF Colonel and an airport security coordinator, I intend to protect them. I agree with the anonymous contributor who called cease fire on the whining. Let it go--you all have become part of the problem and not the solution. You want to inject your witty comments into the fray with no knowledge of the threat or intelligence. It doesn't do anything but fan the fire and help those who intend to harm us. Please go to another website to spend your idle time--I use the data to learn for other airport's misfortune, and your all comments have been nothing but a constant distraction.

Anonymous said...

In this world of exploding clothing and the like, no safety measure is too extreme. The ideas of "privacy" pale in comparison of the need for safety. Any reasonable person will choose safety over privacy every time.

Anonymous said...

To all of you who think the TSA is a waste, you are humiliatingly wrong. As a former airline employee of 20+ years, I am thankful of the screening process. You can't blame the whole system on a few idiot TSA employees who misuse their power and go off the deep end. That's the nature of the beast. EVERY company in the world has those types of people.
Whoever keeps posting the negative remarks "anonymously" is probably a disgruntled fired TSA employee or some type of million mile travelor who complains about everything anyway. You can't tell me that the type of screening we have today doesn't prevent hijackings or incidents. Funny how I don't hear anyone complaining about customs or police checkpoints. The people who are constantly "whining" on this website obviously had no one close to them affected by 911.
As far as the delays go, most of the delays are not the fault of the screeners, it's the idiots who spend 30 minutes complaining to the screeners or the ones who always try to carry on things that are not allowed. That's what back up the lines.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Bob, the most recent post, by a Lauren Smith, clearly violates the commenting policy of, "We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly 'off topic' or that promote services or products." Did you not look at the link?

Someone on the social media team sleeping on the job?"

Yup, thanks for catching that one for me there Anon, I missed it earlier, the problem has been rectified!

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
In this world of exploding clothing and the like, no safety measure is too extreme. The ideas of "privacy" pale in comparison of the need for safety. Any reasonable person will choose safety over privacy every time.

August 19, 2013 at 10:14 AM

---------------------------------

Where do we draw the line on this? The only way to make sure people are not carrying dangerous items is to give them a full body pat down and swab them for explosives, and possibly have a cavity search. Would anybody be willing to endure that every time to fly? Since privacy isn't an issue with some people, would anybody be willing to allow their car and house to be searched?

As a traveler with an insulin pump, I get the full body "enhanced pat down" every time I fly in this country. My insulin pump can't go through the body scanners and it seems to set off the metal detector. That results in me getting touched in areas that only a doctor or my wife should be touching. I dread the day when the explosive detection swabs give a false positive for soap or lotion. I fly through airports without body scanners. Setting off the metal detector used to result in a scan with the hand held metal detector. Whatever happened to them?

Anonymous said...

It would be interesting to know what happens to the people bringing weapons on board. Is there a way to include this info?

Susan Richart said...

To Anonymous on 8/19 at 11:38 a.m.

You might find this interesting:

http://tinyurl.com/l5s6bje

A woman who faces exactly what you do, (although she can avoid being assaulted by going through WBI which you can't) is taking on Pistole and the TSA.

It's a very intresting read.

screen shot/DHS OIG

Anonymous said...

>> … hand held metal detector.
>> Whatever happened to them?

Old, low-tech but proven technology. Little new money to be made in their manufacture.

So no hope of their return.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"Any reasonable person will choose safety over privacy every time."

I'm glad our founding fathers felt that way. Oh wait! No, they didn't. If they had, we'd still be under British rule. At this point, it's very debatable as to whether we'd be better off that way or not.

Anonymous said...

"Comparing the screening process to a body cavity search is ridiculous. 90 percent of passengers are never touched..."

Body cavity searches do not necessarily require physical contact. Stripping and squatting could be sufficient.

Since you did not answer the question, I will assume that your answer is No.

"In this world of exploding clothing and the like, no safety measure is too extreme. The ideas of "privacy" pale in comparison of the need for safety. Any reasonable person will choose safety over privacy every time."

Same question for you: Will you submit to a body cavity search to board an airplane?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"Any reasonable person will choose safety over privacy every time."

If anything, the events of 9/11 show us that our old government failed to protect its subjects. Laws, too loose to pick up the terrorists, were in place and the system couldn't react fast enough to save thousands of people.

The conversion of the government to the system we are heading for will save thousands of lives and defeat our enemies. People have to join in the effort and quit their petty complaining. We must be one country.

Anonymous said...

The conversion of the government to the system we are heading for will save thousands of lives and defeat our enemies.

Totalitarianism saves lives? Please provide examples of that.

Anonymous said...

I don't see 9/11 as a failure of airport security. It was a failure of intelligence to not uncover this plot. Another failure what the ease of gaining access to the cockpit. That has been fixed with the hardened cockpit doors. The other failure was that everyone was always told to cooperate with the hijackers. That ended with United 93.

The key is stopping the terrorists well before they get to the airport. If someone has a bomb at the airport, I think it is already too late. A terrorist isn't going to allow himself to be captured easily. He is likely going to detonate the bomb at the checkpoint which will cause a lot of damage too.

trevor said...

TSA was created for a purpose and after we taken for a surprise ending in disaster, something spiraled into what the entire world in the present day sees in some way, shape or form .

Better to have The TSA than have another disaster.

And, people should just stop complaining ( but start complying, with an open mind)

Anonymous said...

Yes trevor, no American citizen should ever complain about the treatment they receive at the hands of government employees. No Americsn should vote until the government tells them who to vote for. No American should stand against tyranny. No American should act like they have Constitutionally guaranteed rights.

Instead, all Americans should just comply with any rule the government comes up with, even if it's unreasonable, impractical, illegal, immoral, or unconstitutional.

Because that's how this country was started, right? The Colonists just complied with the English. And that's how minorities and women got their rights, by complying with laws that barred them from the freedoms enjoyed by the white male majority.

Read a history book, please.

Anonymous said...

Why haven't you posted my comment? It followed comment specs and blog posting rules?

Anonymous said...

@trevor said, "Stop complaining and start complying."

Huh?!

That is beyond the pale in ridiculousness. Is that what you would have said to the American colonists in 1776?

Is that what you would've said to minorities and women when they demanded equal rights?

Is that what you would say to anyone who is being threatened with assault and theft?

The world does not thank you for collaborating with tyranny.

Screenshot

Comments delayed are comments denied, Bob.