Tuesday, July 30, 2013

TSA Travel Tips Tuesday: Dry Ice

Questions about the transportation of dry ice generally fall into the hazmat realm where FAA has primary oversight. Since we often get dry ice questions, I felt that it would be a great topic for Travel Tips Tuesday.

My first tip is to check with your airline for any guidance they might have on traveling with dry ice. Dry ice is not prohibited by TSA. Secondly, as far as FAA regulations go, dry ice is permissible when traveling with perishables as long as you adhere to the following guidelines. 

  • Packages of dry ice must allow for the release of carbon dioxide gas.
  •  The limit for dry ice for both carry-on and checked baggage is five-pounds. 
  • Packages of dry ice must contain the language "Carbon Dioxide Solid" or "Dry Ice" and must also have the net weight of the dry ice on the package.
See you next Tuesday with more travel tips! 

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team 

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.


22 comments:

Anonymous said...

Does TSA enforce this FCC rule?

Anonymous said...

No, but it does enforce the FAA rule.

Anonymous said...

Why do your rules make no sense regarding frozen liquids? I found this on your website:

"Frozen liquid items are allowed through the checkpoint as long as they are frozen solid when presented for screening. If frozen liquid items are partially melted, slushy, or have any liquid at the bottom of the container, they must meet 3-1-1 liquids requirements."

What is the difference between 500 mL bottle of water that has been frozen solid and one that is not frozen? It's the same material and the same volume. What difference does it make what phase the matter is in? If I could somehow transport the same amount of steam, would that be acceptable? It's not liquid, so would it be allowed? It would be the same as the dry ice that has changed from solid to gas.

Of course I haven't figured out how a pie is acceptable to carryon, but other items with less liquid content are not allowed.

Anonymous said...

Really? Dry ice??

How about talking about the fact that "A new government report says misconduct by Transportation Security Administration workers has increased more than 26% in the last three years.

Some of the most serious violations include: Employees sleeping on the job, letting family and friends go without being screened, leaving work without permission and stealing."
-http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/31/travel/tsa-misconduct/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

Anonymous said...

49 CFR 175.10(a)…

(10) Dry ice (carbon dioxide,
solid), in quantities not
exceeding 2.0 kg (4.4
pounds) per person in carryon
baggage or 2.3 kg (5
pounds) per person in
checked baggage, when used
to refrigerate perishables. The
packaging must permit the
release of carbon dioxide gas.
For checked baggage, the
package must be marked
‘‘DRY ICE’’ or
‘‘CARBON DIOXIDE,
SOLID’’ and must
be marked with the net
weight of dry ice or an
indication the net weight is
2.3 kg (5 pounds) or less.

Anonymous said...

49 CFR 175.10(a)…

(10) Dry ice (carbon dioxide,
solid), in quantities not
exceeding 2.0 kg (4.4 pounds) per person in carryon baggage or 2.3 kg (5 pounds) per person in
checked baggage, when used
to refrigerate perishables. The
packaging must permit the release of carbon dioxide gas. For checked baggage, the package must be marked
‘‘DRY ICE’’ or ‘‘CARBON DIOXIDE,
SOLID’’ and must be marked with the net weight of dry ice or an
indication the net weight is
2.3 kg (5 pounds) or less.

Anonymous said...

Report: TSA employee misconduct up 26% in 3 years.... Any Comments Bob???

Anonymous said...

You should love dry ice. It sublimates, going from solid to gas, therefore avoiding that scary liquid state of matter you are incomprehensibly so afraid of.

Anonymous said...

Frozen liquids are allowed because it is extremely difficult to freeze liquid explosives.

RB said...

We can bring dry ice but if a person is handicapped just expect a TSA Sexual Assult.


"Radio host says TSA agents inappropriately touched, embarrassed her"


"The TSA agent touched her, only where her husband and her doctor do," said Jack Bradshaw, another personality on the radio show.

"A picture posted on her public Facebook profile shows her seemingly distraught after the screening, with an explanation saying, "I was detained, interrogated and molested by 6 TSA agents and 3 bomb explosive experts for over and hour...I've never felt so humiliated.""




I seem to remember TSA announcing this big new program to have specially trained screeners at the checkpoints to deal with special needs travelers.

Seems business as usual at TSA, Sexually Assualt a traveler and call it a Pat down.

TSA screeners are busy digging a hole that will entomb the agency.

The public has had enough of the lawlessness that is TSA.


Susan Richart said...

RB, one has to call and request the "special service." And would "special service" have helped her anyway once the ETD, yet again, alarmed on a harmless substance?

One thing that I can't understand is why are all these people crowded into a private room when they suspect that the passenger could be carrying a bomb?

I also contend, as do many others far more expert in the law than I am, that once an explosive is "detected" by the TSA's super duper testing machines, the administrative search ends and a probable cause search begins. I also contend that the TSA does not have the authority to do a probable cause search; such a search can only be done by law enforcement.

screen shot/DHS OIG

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"Frozen liquids are allowed because it is extremely difficult to freeze liquid explosives."

Actually, that is not the reason. It is feasible to freeze or even solidify liquid explosives (think TNT). The reason frozen liquids are allowed is a save of face following the Brittney Spears Big Gulp episode (google that).

RB said...

Susan Richart said...
RB, one has to call and request the "special service." And would "special service" have helped her anyway once the ETD, yet again, alarmed on a harmless substance?

One thing that I can't understand is why are all these people crowded into a private room when they suspect that the passenger could be carrying a bomb?

I also contend, as do many others far more expert in the law than I am, that once an explosive is "detected" by the TSA's super duper testing machines, the administrative search ends and a probable cause search begins. I also contend that the TSA does not have the authority to do a probable cause search; such a search can only be done by law enforcement.

screen shot/DHS OIG

August 3, 2013 at 7:50 AM

.....................

One would think that the highly trained TSA screener would know how to handle people of all needs.

Maybe the claims about TSA training are just part of the act.

Anonymous said...

It looks like it's time to address the recent GAO report, TSA. I look forward to a blog post on that subject.

Anonymous said...

What does the TSA have to say in response to this article?

http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/06/opinion/hawley-tsa/index.html?eref=rss_mostpopular

This is from the former head of the TSA and not some regular citizen. He should know what is actually a threat. Will the TSA take his advice? He make great points about screening and relaxing the prohibited items list.

Anonymous said...

"I also contend, as do many others far more expert in the law than I am, that once an explosive is "detected" by the TSA's super duper testing machines, the administrative search ends and a probable cause search begins"

Absolutley false!!!

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"I also contend, as do many others far more expert in the law than I am, that once an explosive is "detected" by the TSA's super duper testing machines, the administrative search ends and a probable cause search begins"

Absolutley false!!!


No... she and others really do contend that! ;)

More seriously, what is your argument that this contention is incorrect? Back up your statement with an argument at least.

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous said...
"I also contend, as do many others far more expert in the law than I am, that once an explosive is "detected" by the TSA's super duper testing machines, the administrative search ends and a probable cause search begins"

Absolutley false!!!

~~

The TSA can't justify the legality of the enhanced pat downs.

http://tinyurl.com/k24aznr

As per Wintermute's request, please justify the resolution pat downs.

screen shot/DHS OIG

Anonymous said...

Wintermute said...
More seriously, what is your argument that this contention is incorrect? Back up your statement with an argument at least.

Fruit of the poisonous tree. If the initial search is illegal, then any evidence gathered from it, or due to it, is not admissible.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"Fruit of the poisonous tree. If the initial search is illegal, then any evidence gathered from it, or due to it, is not admissible."

Fair enough. But I was conceding the point that Administrative searches are allowed. Whether TSA's searches fall within that scope or not is another matter entirely ;)

Unknown said...

Follow up question: I work for an ice cream company. We normally pack ice cream for overnight shipping to customers with dry ice on top of the product in a styrofoam cooler, and the cooler goes in a cardboard box. I just tried to fly with a box of ice cream packaged this way as checked luggage, and I was told it has to be in a hard-sided cooler. Number 1, why is that true if styrofoam is what our business uses day after day to ship ice cream? Number 2, how do you have a hard-sided cooler that allows the gas of the dry ice to escape?

Anonymous said...

@Unknown - the 'hard-sided container' is needed to "contain the sublimating gas" - 5# of CO2(s) becomes a LOT OF CO2(g) and could be a SERIOUS DANGER to the other passengers and crew as it replaces the OXYGEN in passenger compartment's air...

As such, I take serious issue with the FAA's blatantly lax regulations regarding this...if just four passengers carried their 'limit' of dry ice onto an aircraft, a long haul would see the ENTIRE FUSELAGE of the average passenger airliner filled with unbreathable carbon dioxide.