Thursday, April 25, 2013

Passengers May Now Receive Notification of TSA Pre✓™ Eligibility on Boarding Passes



Examples of Boarding Passes with the TSA Pre✓™ Logo Circled
Click for More Info
Good news for eligible TSA Pre✓™ passengers! Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and US Airways are beginning to pre-notify passengers on boarding passes if they are eligible for TSA Pre✓™.  By notifying passengers of their TSA Pre✓™ status, passengers are able to better route themselves to the TSA Pre✓™ lane for expedited screening.

Delta and US Airways passengers will see “TSA PRECHCK” on printed boarding passes and the TSA Pre✓™ logo on mobile boarding passes. United passengers will see the TSA Pre✓™ logo on printed boarding passes. Some types of boarding passes may not support the TSA Pre✓™ notification feature at this time. Be sure to visit our website for up-to-date boarding pass specifications. 

Wondering what a TSA Pre✓™ notification may look like? Here is a helpful guide for what to look for! 

Eligible passengers will see a TSA Pre✓™ indicator on all boarding passes, even when flying out of an airport where TSA Pre✓™ is not available.  Eligible passengers should plan ahead and check out the location chart to see where TSA Pre✓™ is available for the participating airlines. If TSA Pre✓™ is unavailable, passengers should proceed to the standard security lanes.

Soon other TSA Pre✓™ participating airlines will be capable of similarly notifying their passengers.  Once fully operational, it will be easier for all participating passengers to know if they should go to the TSA Pre✓™ lane or to the standard security lanes.

If TSA determines a passenger is eligible for expedited screening, information is embedded in the barcode of the passenger’s boarding pass. The TSA Officers will still scan the boarding pass at the document checking station to verify TSA Pre✓™ status. While passengers with the TSA Pre✓™ indicator have been pre-cleared to access the TSA Pre✓™ lane, no passenger is ever guaranteed expedited screening. TSA continues to incorporate random, unpredictable screening measures to ensure the safety of passengers.

TSA Pre✓™ is currently available at 40 airports nationwide and participating passengers no longer have to remove the following items:

  • Shoes
  • 3-1-1 compliant bag from carry-on
  • Laptop from bag
  • Light outerwear/jacket
  • Belt

If you haven’t experienced TSA Pre✓™ be sure to find out how to participate and don’t forget to check for updates as other airlines implement the notification feature. 

Lauren
TSA Blog Team  

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

Conflicting reports of Global Entry users being able to have their GE Card scanned along with their BP for PreCheck. Can you confirm?

Mary epps said...

This is so great and needed, it will save lots of time and help us in knowing more,thanks
Mary

Anonymous said...

Everyone should go through security without having to take off their shoes, jacket or belt. Everyone should be screened using metal detectors and not full body scanners. That is how security is done, successfully, abroad.

RB said...

TSA's Pre Check does nothing for the vast majority of travelers who are likely to be more trust worthy than any TSA employee ever will be.

Anonymous said...

Regarding the last part of your post: If you haven’t experienced TSA Pre✓™ be sure to find out how to participate ...." It would be helpful if you included a link to someplace to find out about PreCheck

Anonymous said...

Awesome! Now I'll know in advance if I need to pack my laptop so I can easily pull it out, know how to pack my liquids, etc etc - much easier to know what to expect and where to go when I get to the airport. A step in the right direction - but just a step!

Anonymous said...

It is really quite hilarious that you folks haven't mentioned the delayed implementation of the new rules on knives. You put up a blog post that gave the date for these rule changes and yet you've made absolutely no mention of the fact that those changes won't go into effect on the date indicated. Are we supposed to trust you as a source of reliable information or not?

Anonymous said...

Are there any additional checks to verify the passenger's Precheck status, other than the little symbol on their boarding pass?

I mean, most airlines give boarding passes ahead of time, that can be printed at home. What's to stop someone from editing their boarding pass to add that little symbol?

Anonymous said...

Why is this not the default level of screening for all passengers, rather than a perk reserved for the wealthy elite?

Anonymous said...

I thought that random incidences of not getting selected for PreCheck at the checkpoint were supposed to mitigate the risks of allowing travelers to transit the checkpoint with less screening than non-PreCheck passengers. If a traveler intending to do harm knows before he/she gets to the checkpoint that he/she will be able to, say, keep on his/her shoes, does that not present that traveler with an opportunity for wrongdoing?

Anonymous said...

24 hours plus and counting and no comments posted. Seems TSA has learned what the public really thinks of TSA and is trying to control the message by hiding.

scout said...

I have only used the PreCheck once but it was great. This is how we should be treated at all airports. If I can go to the trouble and expense to qualify, then I should be able to have a priority screening on all airlines at all airports. I can re-enter the USA via a priority U.S. ICE line yet I cannot fly within the USA without the TSA security lines. The silliness with the security lines has gone on now for over 10 years and is well past time for improvement.

Anonymous said...

I'm curious to know why TSA Pre✓™ has a trademark symbol and what costs, direct or indirect, were incurred in establishing this as a trademark, as well as the benefits of doing so.

Paul H said...

Good news to see a little more visibility in the program.
BUT when will the TSA Pre system be opened up to Global Entry members who are not US citizens? It makes no sense that given the background and security checks undertaken for the GE application that they are refused Pre access

Adrian said...

Still waiting for somebody to cite any evidence that the background check done for PreCheck has any sort of statistical significance in determining if someone is a threat. I'm pretty sure nobody has responded to my previous requests because there is no such evidence and the PreCheck is simply more security theater.

TSORon said...

Anonymous said...
[[Everyone should go through security without having to take off their shoes, jacket or belt. Everyone should be screened using metal detectors and not full body scanners. That is how security is done, successfully, abroad.]]

Actually Anon, there has not been even an attempted airline hijacking in the United States since TSA stood up, but there have been many in other countries. Some heading here, some not. So, security “abroad” is far less than successful. TSA on the other hand…

Anonymous said...

TSORon said...
Actually Anon, there has not been even an attempted airline hijacking in the United States since TSA stood up, but there have been many in other countries. Some heading here, some not. So, security “abroad” is far less than successful. TSA on the other hand…

Actually Ron, there has not been even an attempted tiger mauling in my neighborhood since I bought my tiger-repellant rock, but there have been many in other areas.

Wintermute said...

And how many hijackings were there in the US in the 10 years prior to 9/11, TSAgentRon? Correlation != Causation. If you think otherwise, Ihave this anti-tiger rock I'll sell you...

Anonymous said...

Dear TSORon,

Can you explain to me what you consider the point of time corresponding to your expression "since TSA stood up"?

Was it the day the TSA was created (and people were screened using Pre standards)?
The day the TSA decided nail clippers were dangerous?
The day the TSA decided nail clippers were not dangerous?
The day the liquid state of matter was completely banned?
The day the TSA decided liquids were OK if they were contained by anti-explosive zip-lock bags?
The day everyone had to take off their shoes?
The day everyone had to remove jackets and belts?
The day shoes, jackets and belts of people over 70 or under 12 were deemed "safe"?
The day the TSA stated full body scanners were for secondary searches only?
The day full body scanners became primary search methods?
The day the TSA said full body scanners did not produce offensive images?
The day the TSA removed backscatter machines because they produced images of naked bodies?
The day small knives were not allowed, but scissors were?
The day they decided to allow small knives?
Or the day they discretely shied away from that decision?

I would also like to have examples on how implementing these strategies actually thwarted attacks.

And also please provide examples of foreign attacks on airplanes after whatever date you say the TSA "stood up", and how the TSA would have stopped them.

The fact that none happened is no proof, considering terrorism toward aviation is very, very, very rare. In fact, the US is full of flights over its land this very minute with people exclusively screened using Pre standards (All Air Canada flights to and from Latin America, for example), and none of those have been hijacked either...

Susan Richart said...

TSORon, we've been through this hijacking thing with you before. In the 1980's and 1990's there were no attempts to hijack American passenger planes.

This was, as you might be aware, PRIOR to the TSA's arrival on the scene.

Since 2001, no planes "heading here" have been hijacked. There have been 3 hijackings overseas since 2010, each of them stopped by passengers.

screen shot

Anonymous said...

Susan Richart said...
TSORon, we've been through this hijacking thing with you before. In the 1980's and 1990's there were no attempts to hijack American passenger planes.

I've noticed that (and with any 'true believer' topic, not just the TSA)- they repeat the same points over and over, even though they have already been debunked. Evidently they are waiting for the one time the 'other side' slips and doesn't respond to their argument- because that then makes them 'right', you see?

That's why it's important to call these people on their fallacies.

TSORon said...

Susan Richart said…
[[TSORon, we've been through this hijacking thing with you before. In the 1980's and 1990's there were no attempts to hijack American passenger planes.]]

Actually Susan your wrong, but only by a little bit.
1984-03-28, Global Terrorism Database Incident ID 198403280017.
1984-03-25, Global Terrorism Database Incident ID 198403250008.
1983-02-15, Global Terrorism Database Incident ID 198302150008.
1980-01-25, Global Terrorism Database Incident ID 198001250007.

All documented incidents of hijackings of United States based flights. You can read about them at the link below. The fact remains that hijacking of airlines is an ongoing endeavor around the world, but not in the USA. Many things have changed to make this fact possible, and TSA is only one of those.

From a high point in 1979 of 75 hijackings around the world to our current level of just about 20 per year, hijackings continue to occur. But not in the USA.

http://www.start.umd.edu/gtd/

Susan Richart said...

Again, Ronnie, we’ve been thrugh this before. The following two events are duplicates, each with a different date:

http://www.start.umd.edu/gtd/search/IncidentSummary.aspx?gtdid=198403250008

http://www.start.umd.edu/gtd/search/IncidentSummary.aspx?gtdid=198403250008

Five minutes of searching found no information of any kind on this alleged event:

http://www.start.umd.edu/gtd/search/IncidentSummary.aspx?gtdid=198001250007

Ronnie’s beloved Global Terrorism Data site includes as “terrorism” the murder of a young woman in Ohio and this gem:

"01/06/2011: On Thursday, in Hanover, Maryland, United States, a package was sent to Transportation Secretary Beverly Swaim-Staley. The package was one of two received on the same day, the other was sent to Governor Martin O'Malley. The package was opened by a government employee, subsequently ignited and burned the employee's fingers. No other casualties took place. Explosive material was not found in the package but a small battery and an electric match which ignited the material were recovered. The same note was found in both of the packages as well, stating "Report suspicious activity! Total Bull----! You have created a self fulfilling prophecy." Investigators indicated these notes are in opposition of highway signs urging motorists to report suspicious activity. No group claimed responsibility for the attack."

I will leave it to others to determine for themselves if this site is a crock or not.

screen shot

Wintermute said...

TSORon said...
"The fact remains that hijacking of airlines is an ongoing endeavor around the world, but not in the USA. Many things have changed to make this fact possible, and TSA is only one of those."

So, TSAgentRon, how, exacly, has TSA made us safe? By keeping liquids from going through security? (You realize that the liquid explosives plot was not viable, don't you, and why?) By making us remove our shoes? (based on another plot that was not a viable threat) By electronically strip-searching and/or sexually assaulting passengers? (I stand by both statements. Just because it doesn't display an explicit image does not mean it's not a strip search, and the pat-down would get you charged with sexual assault if a citizen tried it on a stranger on the street... Also, wanna know something about the underwear bomber? Not a viable threat. Starting to see a pattern?)

Stuart said...

On 30 June 2013, I was informed by the supervisor in charge of TSA checkpoint 3 in Terminal 3 of EWR (Newark, NJ) that United Airlines does NOT embed known traveler information into its boarding passes UNLESS it is entered specifically for each reservation AT THE TIME THAT THE TICKET IS BOOKED. In other words, United is not using its frequent flyer profiles to convey known traveler numbers to its boarding passes. I have contacted United Airlines, but am asking you for confirmation of this statement.