Friday, February 8, 2013

TSA Week in Review: Disassembled Rifle Concealed in Two Bags at BOS



While resolving an alarm on checked baggage, officers at Boston Logan (BOS) discovered a fully disassembled 30-30 rifle concealed within the lining of the bag and taped to the straps.

Disassembled Rifle Concealed in Two Bags – While resolving an alarm on checked baggage, officers at Boston Logan (BOS) discovered a fully disassembled 30-30 rifle concealed within the lining of the bag and taped to the straps. Massachusetts State Police responded and ran a check on the serial number of the rifle, revealing that it had been stolen. Police arrested the passenger on state charges.  For the record, it is permissible to travel with firearms in your checked baggage as long as you have legal authority to possess the firearm and you adhere to these guidelines.
 

6 loaded guns.

28 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 28 firearms, 22 were loaded and five had rounds chambered. One passenger in San Francisco had three firearms in his carry-on bag - two loaded pistols (.38 and .40 caliber) and an unloaded .40 caliber. Here are pictures of some of the firearms. See a complete list and more photos at the bottom of this post.  


Grenade Discovered at LAS
Grenade Discovered at LAS
Inert Ordnance and Grenades Etc. – We continue to find inert hand grenades and other weaponry on weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a realistic bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited - real or not. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays. I know they are cool novelty items, but it is best not to take them on a plane.  Read here and here on why inert items cause problems.

  • An inert grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Las Vegas (LAS).

Items in the Strangest Places –It’s important to check your bags prior to traveling to ensure no prohibited items are inside. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found in strange places.

  • A 3¼-inch knife was detected concealed inside a comb in the carry-on bag at Charleston (CHS).
  • A sword cane with a 15” blade was discovered at Houston (IAH).

A 3¼-inch knife was detected concealed inside a comb in the carry-on bag at Charleston (CHS).

Stun Guns –13 stun guns were discovered this week in a carry-on bags around the nation: Two at Atlanta (ATL), two at Denver (DEN), and one each at Branson (BBG), Casper (CPR), Charlotte (CLT), Fort Lauderdale (FLL), Jacksonville (JAX), Lebanon (LEB), Los Angeles (LAX), Minneapolis (MSP), and San Francisco (SFO). 

What Not to Say at an Airport – Statements like these not only delay the people who said them but can also inconvenience many other passengers if the checkpoint or terminal has to be evacuated:

  • A Newark (EWR) passenger stated “I have a bomb in my bag” to one of our officers. She then went on to explain that she was just joking.

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items - In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our Officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, Airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, and a lot of sharp pointy things -- to mention a few…  

Firearms Discovered This Week

5 loaded firearms.
4 loaded firearms.


28 firearms discovered. Of those, 22 were loaded.
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.  

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the throughput is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500.00. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, I compile my data from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly (increase) from what I report in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear, or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will not be estimates.
 


If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our post highlighting the dangerous, scary, and downright unusual items our officers found in 2012. 

Bob Burns 
TSA Blog Team 

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

52 comments:

Wintermute said...

Was that 3.5" blade a danger to the aircraft? Not hardly. And 15" is hardly a "sword."

Anonymous said...

The LA Times article published today entitled "TSA Tips Set For Travel Show" is a good example of how the TSA wastes taxpayer monies. The TSA's silly attempt to rehabilitate your disgraced reputation by educating the traveling public is laughable.

Anonymous said...

How many of these firearms that we see each week are in possession of legal gun owners? I find it hard to believe that a law abiding gun owner would "forget" about their firearm when going through an airport. If so, they need to have their license revoked.

RB said...

Another week and TSA proves again that Electronic Strip Search Machines are a waste of tax payers moneys.

Why no mention of the three airports in the news this week with substantial missing property?

Either TSA employees are robbing people blind or baggage handlers are. Either way if something can be taken out of a bag that means something can just as easily be put in. Seeing as how TSA has refused to act responsibly and screen airport workers the chances are that something will get loaded someday that will destroy the aircraft and all souls on-board.

All while TSA is harassing innocent passengers,grabbing travelers crotches, and confiscating their harmless water.

TSA = FAIL

Anonymous said...

And that's not at all your fine upstanding co-workers at Logan Airport were up to recently.

https://plus.google.com/103112149634414554669/posts/TRK8eenGuuw

Anonymous said...

Disassembled Rifle Concealed in Two Bags – While resolving an alarm on checked baggage, officers at Boston Logan (BOS) discovered a fully disassembled 30-30 rifle concealed within the lining of the bag

A rifle in a CHECKED bag is no threat to the plane. And, as you pointed out: For the record, it is permissible to travel with firearms in your checked baggage

So, why did you search this bag?

We continue to find inert hand grenades and other weaponry on weekly basis.

Y'all still don't seem to realize that "inert" = no threat to the plane.

A 3¼-inch knife was detected concealed inside a comb

Yet, I can carry on a pair of scissors with 4 inch blades, snap them apart, and have two 4 inch blades.

13 stun guns were discovered this week in a carry-on bags around the nation:

...because a terrorist will stun the plane.

A Newark (EWR) passenger stated “I have a bomb in my bag” to one of our officers. She then went on to explain that she was just joking.

Darn, another terrorist plot foiled. They were counting on a double-reverse bluff, and y'all found them out. Good job. ::eyeroll::

Anonymous said...

TSA needs to post and put their regulattions on TV

Anonymous said...

So why do you need body scanners again?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Disassembled Rifle Concealed in Two Bags – While resolving an alarm on checked baggage, officers at Boston Logan (BOS) discovered a fully disassembled 30-30 rifle concealed within the lining of the bag

A rifle in a CHECKED bag is no threat to the plane. And, as you pointed out: For the record, it is permissible to travel with firearms in your checked baggage

So, why did you search this bag?


------------

You did read the part where it set off an alarm because it was hidden in the bag. While gun are allowed in checked baggage, they need to be declared.

Ontop of that it was also stolen!

If you're going to insult the tsa about their policies, at least know what you're talking about.

Anonymous said...

An inert grenade, like a fake gun or fake bomb, would cause some unnecessary fear and excitement.

Randy said...

While I agree that the rifle found in the checked bag presented no threat to the plane, the TSA rightly investigated because it was *hidden* in the bags. The person may have been able to *declare* it without it being discovered that it was stolen. I guess that depends on if the person has to reveal the serial number and the TSA or airline verifies the serial number.

Anonymous said...

It is simple, if you are transportating a weapon (legal) in a checked bag, you declare it, it is unloaded, no ammo inside the bag (period), and there is no chance of it being used other than at an authorized target range. If not declared, hidden, well, a little jail time is justified, that is unless there are other reasons of having a loaded weapon on board an aircraft, and that had better be legal, if not more jail time.
If any weapon is used in anyway, the individual or individuals should get the maximun punsishment or other is justified, period. Knifes, swords, etc with hidden blades, have no reason of not being declared, and only in checked baggage, never on hand carry on bags.

There is no, oh, I forgot, how about a year in prison, if to be used otherwise, life in prison or more. Keep it safe and honest for all those who travel, great work in stopping possible problems.

Explosives have no reason to be aboard an aircraft, it would mean that someone or some people have other reasons, and those reasons are to hurt others. There is a wall and a firing squad somewhere for that.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...

"You did read the part where it set off an alarm because it was hidden in the bag. While gun are allowed in checked baggage, they need to be declared."

I don't know if the Anon you're replying to, but I did, and have some comments ;) The first of which is, yes, this person failed to declare the gun, but, I'm guessing what Anon was getting at was "was the gun, in checked baggage, a threat to aviation?"

"Ontop of that it was also stolen!"

Irrelevant. It is not in the TSA's purview to find and recover stolen items in checked baggage, and it does not change the fact that this weapon was not a threat to aviation.

"If you're going to insult the tsa about their policies, at least know what you're talking about."

I cannot speak for the Anon you are replying to, and am just speculating here, but I would guess that this Anon did not articulate his criticism as well as (s)he could have. The criticism itself is valid if my speculation is correct, though ;)

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
You did read the part where it set off an alarm because it was hidden in the bag. While gun are allowed in checked baggage, they need to be declared.Ontop of that it was also stolen!

Irrelevant- they didn't know this until AFTER they searched the bag a (because there was a perfectly allowable item in it) and found the gun.

If you're going to insult the tsa about their policies, at least know what you're talking about.

Guns are allowed in checked baggage.
They searched the bag because it had a gun... which is allowed... in it.

SSSS for some reason said...

So which of these items required the fancy scanners?

And!

How many terrorist found this week? How many terrorist plots foiled?

GSOLTSO said...

Some folks have posted information or had questions about the firearms and their transport, this is just a small clarification.

Firearms are completely legal to transport, as long as they are declared, unloaded and contained in a hardsided, locked container.

Ammunition is allowed, as long as it is no larger than .75 in caliber, is packaged in containers designed for transporting ammunition (such as the original manufacturers cardboard/metal/wooden boxes), and are inside a hardsided locked container as well.

More information on the transport of firearms and ammunition can be found here:

http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/firearms-and-ammunition

As for the rifle in this article, it does not indicate that they opened the bag for the rifle, it only indicates that they opend the bag for an alarm - this could have been the rifle, or it could have been any number of other items in the bag. As with any other bag check, if an undeclared weapon is found in checked baggage, LEO is to be notified.

West
TSA Blog Team

Milton Wannaker said...

I am so sick and tired of the whiners on these comments. A 3.5 inch blade not a danger to the aircraft? The terrorists of 9-11 used a 0.5 inch blade to murder their victims, including pilots (box cutters if you want a translation). There should be a NO TOLERANCE policy on blades and points, period! And as for so called jokers - the joke should be on THEM! At the very least they should be detained past their flight time/date while their bodies, clothing and bags are searched THOROUGHLY not just for devices, but residue and other secondary evidence. I'd rather arrive alive than be mourned by survivors.

Anonymous said...

How is somebody with a boxcutter or 3.5" bladed knife going to gain access to the cockpit these days? I don't want weapons on planes, but I recognize that a boxcutter isn't a threat to the plane anymore. Instead of focusing on non-threats like knives, toothpaste, and shampoo, the TSA should be focusing on finding explosives. However, I think the way the checkpoints are slowed by the body scanners which forces more people into a tiny area, makes a better and easier target than an airplane these days.

David Reyes said...

Congratulations TSA on another successful week. By my calculations your averaging around 30 Ilegal items per week. I take notice and I am a law abiding citizen who would never challenge your resolve so the enemies of America are surely looking for your weakness.

Although your not having the full support of our government who has short term memory you still continue to utilize available resources to prevent aircraft hijacking and suicide attacks with hundreds of innocent people on board.

I fought in Afghanistan, Iraq and have boots on the ground in other places where Americans have died by the haters of our country.

Keep up the good job, anonymous has a voice to complain because of the liberties that our country has to offer. In some other countries that I have visited it would be aolitical prisoner and therefore it lives in the USA.

Anonymous said...

@Milton:

Post-9/11, passengers and crew are not going to comply with terrorists. The mindset has changed. A 3.5-inch blade in the hands of a terrorist does nothing to counteract this mindset.

A 3.5-inch blade also does nothing to gain entrance to the cockpit, which is now secured.

TSA wastes resources looking for 3.5-inch blades.

SSSS for some reason said...

@ Milton.... " I'd rather arrive alive than be mourned by survivors."

Do you realize you have a greater chance of being killed in a car accident on the way to the airport. Greater by a huge factor. By the TSA's own admission they only stop roughly a third of weapons at the checkpoints. That means that for the 30 guns found this week there were as many as 70 more that made it past the checkpoint and were on the airplanes. Maybe even sitting right next to you the whole time.

Aviation is not as fragile as the TSA would have you believe. There aren't really so many people trying to hijack planes or do other nasty things. Other countries that don't have the benefit of a TSA providing their security don't have airplanes raining terror and destruction down on their populations so I am very confident that there is no line of terrorists just waiting in the parking lot to slip through the first tiny hole in the security cordon. Well.... if they were filming a movie that might happen, but not something that is happening in the real world.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
You did read the part where it set off an alarm because it was hidden in the bag. While gun are allowed in checked baggage, they need to be declared.Ontop of that it was also stolen!

Irrelevant- they didn't know this until AFTER they searched the bag a (because there was a perfectly allowable item in it) and found the gun.

If you're going to insult the tsa about their policies, at least know what you're talking about.

Guns are allowed in checked baggage.
They searched the bag because it had a gun... which is allowed... in it.
___________________________________
The bag alarmed and it was searched. That's when the agents found the gun. Unloaded guns are allowed in checked baggage provided that A:) They are unloaded and B) They are in a LOCKED,HARDSIDED CONTAINER that is strong enough to prevent easy access. That's been an FAA and AIrline Regulation for a long, long time and TSA adopted it too.

Anonymous said...

https://twitter.com/LesParrott/status/300975367911514112/photo/1

Look at that mass of unscreened passengers, packed closer together than they would be on any plane.

What is TSA doing to mitigate the threat of a suicide bomber attacking the checkpoint queue?

You confiscate passengers' toiletries and water, yet a suicide bomber could take out more passengers right there in line than by attacking a plane.

And by slowing down screening with all the antics -- shoe and liquids and laptop removal and AIT, compared to pre-TSA checkpoints -- you are lengthening queues, and putting passengers at *higher* risk of an attack at the checkpoint itself.

Of course, I fully expect this entry to be posted and the question fully ignored. Because that's your way, Bob.

ARMYCSM said...

I suspect the majority of the offenders are permit carrying obsessed gun owners who, conveniently forget when the weapons are discovered.
GOOD JOB TSA

Anonymous said...

If I am reading this correctly, the gun wasn't the reason the bags were searched. The TSA just happned to get lucky that the bags had something else in them that alarmed which lead to the gun being found. The TSA basically found a disassembled gun, in two CHECKED bags, which the passenger would not have had access to, and found it by dumb luck.

I think the passenger didn't know the rules and thought if the gun was in pieces and checked, it would be ok. Unfoturnately for him, that was a bad mistake.

Anonymous said...

Funny, how after West got roundly criticized for his dishonesty in last week's blotter post, there's no mention this week of how any of this week's firearms were detected (WTMD, naked body scanners, baggage x-ray, etc.)...

Anonymous said...

What is the problem with a gun disassembled into two bags? TSA guidelines specifically say that gun parts are fine in checked baggage. A taken apart gun in two bags would be a bunch of parts, right? I personally travelled with gun parts last week and chose to have my bag cleared by the very smart and professional TSA agents that deal with guns frequently. However, they told me that they did not need to clear my bag.
That the gun was found to be stolen afterwards is a red herring. Unless every gun that goes through TSA is checked.

Wintermute said...

Milton Wannaker said...
"I am so sick and tired of the whiners on these comments. A 3.5 inch blade not a danger to the aircraft?"

Can a terrorist make it into the cockpit with a blade of any type now? No, as the cockpit doors have been hardened and passengers would take the idiot down if they tried.

"The terrorists of 9-11 used a 0.5 inch blade to murder their victims, including pilots (box cutters if you want a translation)."

Yes, but the cockpit doors were not hardened, and everyone was trained to cooperate with the terrorists because the common thinking was that cooperation was the way to survive a high-jacking attempt.

"There should be a NO TOLERANCE policy on blades and points, period!"

Would you also ban steak knives and forks in all restaurants past the checkpoint and in first class? If not, then pointy things are still available, INSIDE the "sterile" area.

"And as for so called jokers - the joke should be on THEM! At the very least they should be detained past their flight time/date while their bodies, clothing and bags are searched THOROUGHLY not just for devices, but residue and other secondary evidence."

Secondary evidence of what, exactly?

"I'd rather arrive alive than be mourned by survivors."

If our forefathers thought this way, we'd still be under British rule. I, for one, would rather die than give the liberties others have fought and died for.

RB said...

So it seems TSA is finding about 50 or so legitimate weapons each week.

Sounds great right?

So 50 weapons in a years time is
50*52=2600 weapons each year. Still sounds pretty good, right?

TSA needs EIGHT BILLION DOLLARS to find these 2600 weapons.

Anonymous said...

Hey, Milton, read this on allowed "sharp" things:

Tools (seven inches or less in length) Yes in carry-on

Screwdrivers (seven inches or less in length) Yes in carry-on

Wrenches and Pliers (seven inches or less in length) Yes in carry-on

Knitting and Crochet Needles Yes in carry-on

Scissors - metal with pointed tips and blades shorter than four inches in length Yes in carry-on

All of the above could do a lot of damage but never have on an airplane.

Anonymous said...

To everyone complaing about the gun. Yes they are allowed to be checked, and the tsa did get lucky in finding it. That's not the point. The reason it set off an alarm is that guns in checked baggage are required to be DELCARED! If you don't tell the airline about the gun when you drop off your bags, you're breaking secutiry procedures. On top of that the guy was hiding it inside the bags, he clearly stole it and tried to smuggle it home with him and sell it.

Rich said...

Some of us in the airline and airport industry actually use the information posted on this site to help us with our jobs. We'd really appreciate if some of you would find some other site to spam. I would rather see comments that add to the security of airline travel and not detract from them.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous Rich said...

Some of us in the airline and airport industry actually use the information posted on this site to help us with our jobs

----------------------------------
Can you provide specific examples of information posted in the blog that that helped you do your job and how it helped?

oblivion2k said...

http://www.thestrad.com/Article.asp?ArticleID=2524

Nice work there TSA, this bow was priceless.

Anonymous said...

Rich said...
Some of us in the airline and airport industry actually use the information posted on this site to help us with our jobs. We'd really appreciate if some of you would find some other site to spam. I would rather see comments that add to the security of airline travel and not detract from them.


Whom are you speaking to, Rich? Blogger Bob doesn't allow spam through the strict TSA comment moderation.

What information do you use, Rich, in your "airline and airport industry?" The repeating of information available 24/7/365 on the main TSA website?

I find a lot of information about how the TSA is only security theater and many suggestions on how to actually make airports and planes safer...not from the TSA blog posts, but from the commenters.

How about you, Rich?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"To everyone complaing about the gun. Yes they are allowed to be checked, and the tsa did get lucky in finding it. That's not the point. The reason it set off an alarm is that guns in checked baggage are required to be DELCARED! If you don't tell the airline about the gun when you drop off your bags, you're breaking secutiry procedures. On top of that the guy was hiding it inside the bags, he clearly stole it and tried to smuggle it home with him and sell it."

Yes, you are correct. The passenger apparently didn't follow the correct procedure for checking the gun in his baggage.

The problem isn't that the passenger was carrying a weapon improperly. Obviously, if an improperly packed weapon is found, the screeners should call law enforcement to deal with the situation.

The real first problem is that the TSA insists it HAS to use the strip search scanners to find guns, when guns are obviously found in the carry-on and checked baggage x-ray machines and would be found using Walk-Through Metal Detectors.

The real second problem is the TSA is using all of these "found weapons" to scare flyers into complying with their abusive and invasive tactics.

The real third problem is the TSA is pretending it does a great job by using this blog as a "police blotter," and listing "found weapons," when they miss 7 weapons for every 3 they find.

Susan Richart said...

Oh, lookie, lookie: scanners rejected for use at a prison BECAUSE THEY MISS TOO MANY ITEMS!!!!!!

"A prison service evaluation report says the scanners detected just 57% of test items. The items not detected include a knife and scissors."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-21451741

screen shot

Anonymous said...

How many priceless bows will TSA destroy this week?

TSORon said...

On Anonymous said to another Anonymous:
[[Guns are allowed in checked baggage.
They searched the bag because it had a gun... which is allowed... in it.]]

Actually Anon, to be “allowed” it must be in a locked, hard sided case, comply with local laws, and be declared to the airline. All of these things are verified before TSA ever screens the bag. Meet those conditions and you can bring whatever type of firearm you like. The individual in question here complied with none of those requirements. None. So no, in this case it was not allowed, not by TSA regulations but by FAA regulations (and local law).

TSORon said...

RB said...
[[So it seems TSA is finding about 50 or so legitimate weapons each week.

Sounds great right?

So 50 weapons in a years time is
50*52=2600 weapons each year. Still sounds pretty good, right?

TSA needs EIGHT BILLION DOLLARS to find these 2600 weapons.]]

So that forces me to ask RB, what costs did 9/11 directly our country? How about ancillary costs? $1 Trillion, $2 Trillion, 3? Sounds like TSA is a bargain considering…

Anonymous said...

I saw the story that Kanye and Kim were allowed to bypass security, but were stopped and screened on the jetway. I realize the airline employee bypassed security for them improperly. However, I am concerned that the screening wasn't properly conducted.

Since this was done in the jetway, how were the bags and shoes x-rayed? Were explosive residue tests conducted? Why weren't these two taken back to the security checkpoint for screening? Would a regular passenger be allowed this special screening on the jetway?

Shouldn't the terminal be evacuated in this situation? Either of these two could have handed off a prohibited item to another person. I've seen terminal dumps done in the past for this. I've seen TSA screeners threaten scared children from hugging their parents because of the danger of something being handed off. Out of an abundance of caution, shouldn't the terminal have been evacuated?

Anonymous said...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-21451741

No wonder why your MMW gizmos are turning up such few weapons.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Anonymous said...
"To everyone complaing about the gun. Yes they are allowed to be checked, and the tsa did get lucky in finding it. That's not the point. The reason it set off an alarm is that guns in checked baggage are required to be DELCARED! If you don't tell the airline about the gun when you drop off your bags, you're breaking secutiry procedures. On top of that the guy was hiding it inside the bags, he clearly stole it and tried to smuggle it home with him and sell it."

Yes, you are correct. The passenger apparently didn't follow the correct procedure for checking the gun in his baggage.

The problem isn't that the passenger was carrying a weapon improperly. Obviously, if an improperly packed weapon is found, the screeners should call law enforcement to deal with the situation.

The real first problem is that the TSA insists it HAS to use the strip search scanners to find guns, when guns are obviously found in the carry-on and checked baggage x-ray machines and would be found using Walk-Through Metal Detectors.

The real second problem is the TSA is using all of these "found weapons" to scare flyers into complying with their abusive and invasive tactics.

The real third problem is the TSA is pretending it does a great job by using this blog as a "police blotter," and listing "found weapons," when they miss 7 weapons for every 3 they find.

February 13, 2013 at 10:18 AM




Excect what I said IS my point. The arguement going on about the gun had no relation to anything you just said. Stop pushing this unfounded hatred of the tsa.

every arguement against them has been proven wrong, yet people keep quoting outdated and incorrect stats, or just make things up. The main thing that comes to mind is the term "strip search machine" I've seen the pics from each version of the display, and not once did I think, hey look naked people. The pictures they see look more like blobs that vaguely look human, but some people enjoy that stuff. To each their own.

Everyone complaining about freedoms being taken away and all that, well you're stupid. When you enter the airport you know what's coming, you are volentarily letting them search you. No warrent is needed because by purchasing a plane ticket you are allowing the tsa to search you before your flight. So get over it or don't fly. Making a big show of complaining at the airport only makes you miss your flight, and piss people off in line.

So in conclusion, everyone who complains about the tsa needs to get over themselves, you aren't helping anything by complaining.

Anonymous said...

Simple question - one which I have not found a clear answer for yet, despite my searches of the internet.

Do gun parts need to be declared, etc. (as if it is a fully operational gun) when placed in checked baggage?

Anonymous said...

"The bag alarmed and it was searched. That's when the agents found the gun. Unloaded guns are allowed in checked baggage provided that A:) They are unloaded and B) They are in a LOCKED,HARDSIDED CONTAINER that is strong enough to prevent easy access. That's been an FAA and AIrline Regulation for a long, long time and TSA adopted it too. "

A violation of a regulation but absolutely no danger to aviation.

Susan Richart said...

TSORon, please tell us how many terrorists the TSA has stopped. Only then can we determine if the $8 billion yearly cost is worth it.

9/11 is estimated to have cost the country between 2 and 3.3 trillion.

That cost is peanuts, however, compared to the psychological and economic damage being done by our very own government in its on-going perpetuation of fear-mongering.

screen shot

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...

"The arguement going on about the gun had no relation to anything you just said. Stop pushing this unfounded hatred of the tsa."

The argument over the gun may or may not be relevant, but the hatred of TSA is hardly unfounded ;)

"every arguement against them has been proven wrong,"

It has? News to me. A certain TSO has attempted to prove me wrong, but he's failed at it every single time.

"yet people keep quoting outdated and incorrect stats,"

And I've shown how those "outdated" stats are still relevant countless times, and not even TSA claims they're incorrect.

"or just make things up"

Did you just make that part up yourself? My arguments have always been based on sound logic.

"Everyone complaining about freedoms being taken away and all that, well you're stupid."

Insults? Really? You make an awful lot of spelling and grammar mistakes for someone insulting others' intelligence (please note that normally I do not complain about this type of thing and make my fair share of typos and such. But then again I don't go around violating comment guidelines by calling others stupid.)

"When you enter the airport you know what's coming, you are volentarily letting them search you. No warrent is needed because by purchasing a plane ticket you are allowing the tsa to search you before your flight."

You are only partially right. When I fly, I am consenting to an administrative search to look for weapons and explosives. I do NOT consent to be strip searched and sexually assaulted. Regardless of what the TSA claims, there IS a difference between what the TSA does and an administrative search.

"So get over it or don't fly."

That short sentence has so many problems with it. First, TSA is literally everywhere, so avoiding flying does not avoid TSA. Second, travel is a right in this country, and, again despite claims otherwise, that right includes commercial flight. Finally, why should I have to take an even greater risk by driving just so the TSA can make a big show of keeping everyone safe when they don't actually.

"Making a big show of complaining at the airport only makes you miss your flight, and piss people off in line."

Too bad for the people in line. TSA is who slows the whole process down, not the few "complainers" that go through and exercise their first amendment rights while doing so.

Scott said...

It is amazing that so many items were attempted to be smuggled through onto airplanes.

TSORon said...

Susan Richart said...
[[TSORon, please tell us how many terrorists the TSA has stopped. Only then can we determine if the $8 billion yearly cost is worth it.]]

Lets be honest Susan, only then can YOU personally determine if the cost is worth it. That would be assuming that your premise is an accurate interpretation of what TSA does and why. Of course it’s not, but don’t let that stop you.

[[9/11 is estimated to have cost the country between 2 and 3.3 trillion.]]

So, 19 people caused 2 to 3.3 Trillion dollars in damage to our country. That means that each individual caused between $105,236,157,894 and $173,684,210,526 damage to our nation in a single day (of course that does not include the emotional damage now does it). $105 to $173 billion each. And you wonder why the government spends $8 billion annually on TSA? The answer “should” be obvious.

[[That cost is peanuts, however, compared to the psychological and economic damage being done by our very own government in its on-going perpetuation of fear-mongering.]]

Again, the answer “should” be obvious. I don’t expect that you and some others here will ever “get it”, but the average citizen surely does.

Wintermute said...

TSORon said...
"Again, the answer “should” be obvious. I don’t expect that you and some others here will ever “get it”, but the average citizen surely does."

The average citizen does lots of things the average citizen should not do. This does not make the average citizen correct.

Anonymous said...

Bob, TSORon is at it again with the rude insults of Amercian citizens. Please treat the taxpaying public better than your co-worker. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

My 74 year old Mother was just fined, and threatened with prosecution by the TSA for CHECKING a bag containing a plastic stock for a rifle. The TSA said it must be declared in a locked case. The TSA’s own web site says firearm parts may be in checked bags and says nothing about declaring or locking. This item wouldn't even make a good club, and it was in a CHECKED bag. She didn't violate any published TSA policy's, yet she is still being fined. Someone at the TSA please get some common sense and then train the other agents.