Friday, October 26, 2012

TSA Week in Review: 42 Firearms Discovered This Week at TSA Checkpoints (38 Loaded)


Loaded Gun
Loaded 9mm Discovered at LEX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42 Firearms – 42 firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags at TSA checkpoints. 38 of the 42 were loaded and 12 firearms actually had a round in the chamber. See below for a complete list and photos of some of the firearms.

 

Throwing Star – A throwing star was discovered via a pat down when an Atlantic City (ACY)  passenger going through a body scanner alarmed.

 

Throwing Star
Throwing Star Discovered With Body Scanner at ACY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loaded Gun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concealed Firearm – An unloaded .38 caliber was detected at Indianapolis (IND) concealed in the lining of the bag.

 

Syringe
Syringe That Stuck Officer in TUS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TSA Officer Stuck With Syringe – An Officer at Tucson (TUS) was stuck by a syringe while searching a bag. This is one of the reasons our officers ask if you have anything sharp or dangerous in your bags before they search them. For the safety of our Officers, please be sure to be mindful of any sharp or dangerous items in your bags. 

 

Grenades

















Inert Grenades Etc. – We continue to find inert hand grenades and other weaponry on weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a realistic bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited - real or not. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays. I know they are cool novelty items, but it is best not to take them on a plane.  Read here and here on why inert items cause problems.

  • Replica grenades were discovered in two separate golf bags at Charleston (CHS) after they both alarmed in checked baggage.
  • Two replica grenades were discovered at Richmond (RIC).
  • A grenade lighter was discovered in a carry-on bag at Seattle (SEA).
  • High Explosives? Pun intended. You see, not only was a novelty grenade discovered at Denver (DEN), it was a novelty grenade with a green leafy substance contained within. We’re not looking for drugs, but you can guarantee the odds are in our favor of finding them if they’re stuffed in a grenade.

What Not to Say at an Airport – Statements like these not only delay the people who said them but can also inconvenience many other passengers if the checkpoint or terminal has to be evacuated:

  • After his request to have his checked bags removed from the aircraft was denied, a passenger became upset and stated that “the airline did not know if he had a bomb in his bag.”
  • A passenger at Las Vegas (LAS) became upset while his son’s bag was being searched and stated: “There is a bomb in there.”
  • A Federal Air Marshal overheard a passenger at Washington Reagan (DCA) telling another passenger to watch his bag because it had a bomb in it.
  • A passenger overheard another passenger at Denver (DEN) state: “I hope you are not on the plane leaving at Gate A-37, it’s going to go off with a blast.”

Stun Guns –  Nine stun guns were discovered in carry-on bags at checkpoints around the nation: Two at Denver (DEN), Burbank (BUR), Dothan (DHN), Las Vegas (LAS), San Antonio (SAT), Jacksonville (JAX), Seattle (SEA), and Los Angeles (LAX)

Throwing Star















Miscellaneous Prohibited Items - In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our Officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, Airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, and a lot of sharp pointy things -- to mention a few…

Firearms - Here are pictures of some of the firearms our Officers found in carry-on baggage since I posted last Friday. See a complete list below. 

Loaded Guns
Loaded Guns
Loaded Guns
Loaded Guns
Loaded Guns
Loaded Guns








































































































42 guns found at checkpoints this week.









You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the throughput is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.











 
If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

59 comments:

Jason Rasmussen said...

From the guns you found, how many had a conceal & carry license?

Anonymous said...

YAWN

Tell us something, Bob.

RB said...

Bob, is the TSA Blog as now deteriorated nothing more than a weekly recap of things TSA SHOULD BE FINDING, and things that could be found with only conventional baggage x ray and WTMD going to be your legacy?

Is this the best our tax dollars get, only a weekly recap, no comments posted for days on end, and none of this at all:

"This blog is sponsored by the Transportation Security Administration to facilitate an ongoing dialogue on innovations in security, technology and the checkpoint screening process."

Like everything else about TSA even a simple blog turns out to be an abject failure.

RB said...

Bob, is this blog in its current deteriorated condition your legacy of just one more TSA failure?

Can you and TSA do nothing more than post a weekly recap of things that TSA Screening should find and could be found with nothing more than conventional baggage x ray and WTMD?

Is this really all you have to offer?

Anonymous said...

So Bob, I'm assuming we're never going to hear anything about the cancer patients that were mistreated by TSA staff. Given that it's weeks later and you're still ignoring it, I think we know what conclusions can be drawn from that, now don't we?

Anonymous said...

No mention of the ABC News story entitled "The Top 20 Airports For TSA Theft"?

No mention of the Washington Post story entitled "TSA Fights Major Image Problem"?

If any American needs a good reason to vote for change on November 6th, they need look no further than the TSA. The TSA is a disgrace.

Anonymous said...

You know that syringe? The TSO probably asked the person (probably a diabetic) who had it if they had anything "sharp and dangerous" in the bag. Diabetics are so used to needles they don't qualify as "dangerous". Logically A true and a False is a False.

But seriously, folks, if you are a diabetic, please make sure you put the safety back on the needle you use for your insulin injections so the TSO's don't get stuck.

Anonymous said...

In a June letter to TSA officials around the country, Pistole said “I am concerned that the prompt reporting of misconduct, lapses in integrity and ethics is not part of the culture across all of TSA.” He told officials: “You must support a culture of hard work, integrity and professionalism in which employees feel free to report SOP [standard operating procedure] violations and misconduct without fear of retaliation.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/tsa-fights-major-image-problem/2012/10/24/0b4c3eaa-1d46-11e2-9cd5-b55c38388962_story.htm

This is what you should be talking about Bob.

RB said...

Bob, why not talk about the secret TSA Museum, complete with staff including a curator with a Masters Degree and other employees.

How much is this secret, not open to the public, TSA museum costing taxpayers?

Anonymous said...

Hey Bob, we're still waiting to hear TSA's side of the incident concerning Michelle Dunaj when she passed through SEA-TAC. For any of you readers who aren't familiar with this story just Google Michelle Dunaj and ask yourself if you would like to be treated the way this lady claims she was treated by TSA then ask yourself why, why this lady would make up such a story. We must continue to press TSA for a response to the claimed act of abuse by TSA employees.

Anonymous said...

It doesn't matter if you have a conceal and carry license, you still cannot carry a firearm on an aircraft. Unless you are a flying LEO. Duh.....

SB said...

Mr. Burns, most police departments maintain something similar to this blog: they call it a police log or police blotter.

That is exactly what this so-called "blog" has turned into.

It is a disgrace that the TSA employs an entire team just to compile a weekly police blotter.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
You know that syringe? The TSO probably asked the person (probably a diabetic) who had it if they had anything "sharp and dangerous" in the bag. Diabetics are so used to needles they don't qualify as "dangerous". Logically A true and a False is a False.

But seriously, folks, if you are a diabetic, please make sure you put the safety back on the needle you use for your insulin injections so the TSO's don't get stuck.

October 27, 2012 6:05 AM
..............
Doesn't anyone wonder just why TSA was doing a hand search of this persons bag?

Perhaps an illegal search for drugs?

Anonymous said...

Who carries stun guns? People with a law enforcement job who forgot they had it? Ex-criminals? Or average Joe or even Grandma? Just curious.

Anonymous said...

what a dumb way to lose a good gun!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Who carries stun guns? People with a law enforcement job who forgot they had it? Ex-criminals? Or average Joe or even Grandma? Just curious.

October 27, 2012 10:52 AM


How does a stun gun threaten a commercial airplane? Locked cockpit doors make them a non issue.

RB said...

I-Team: Woman Says TSA Agent Stole Jewels At Logan Airport

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2012/10/26/i-team-woman-says-tsa-agent-stole-jewels-at-logan-airport/

How long before TSA claim (again) that proper procedures were followed?

With all of the thieving TSA screeners TSA should be turning a profit by now!

brainscatter said...

I thought that 100% bag matching meant that anyone who doesn't board a flight necessitates removing their bag from the flight. But that's just my understanding...

Anonymous said...

It's easy to see the reason why TSA has turned this blog into a weekly firearms tallying report. For an agency that is rapidly losing trust with the public and destroying itself from within, posting statistics and pictures of dangerous weapons they find is one of the last Security Theater shows they can count on to survive.

A lot of these firearm finds never leads to an arrest, and the majority of those passengers had no bad intentions. Prior to TSA searching their bags, they were carrying the firearm legally and forgot they had it on them.

If you are not a person who is familiar with firearm carrying laws and the citizens who legally carry it, you probably don't realize that the very same guns posted on this blog are being carried by strangers everywhere around you. They are in the checkout lines at the grocery store, sitting on the bus next to you, eating at the table across from you in a restaurant, etc. These law abiding citizens have never pulled their gun out and used it on you. The illegally carrying thug with criminal intentions are the ones who do that.

I live in Washington State where 1 in 7 citizens have a conceal carry permit. Add off duty cops who are exempt from permits, AND the thugs who don't have permits but carry firearms anyway because that's what criminals do (disregard the law), and it's safe to say that about every 5th to 7th person you pass on the street is more than likely carrying a firearm.

The point I'm trying to make is that in America, guns are common, and state carry permit laws require personal fireamrs to be carried in a concealed manner which is why you never get the true picture of just how commonly these guns are being carried by law abiding citizens as they go about thier business in public. It becomes like 3+ ounces of liquids----it's secure in your possession and out of reach from strangers, but TSA won't hesitate to let everyone around you know that you forgot to take it out when they find it after sticking thier fingers in your bags.

But even with all that said, I wonder if some of the numbers in these weekly statistics are being skewed by the TSA. If they say 43 firearms were found at checkpoints, is the real number actually lower? For example, did they catch only 30 firearms going through screening checkpoints while 13 firearms invloved some other legal, non-checkpoint related incident that TSA somehow got involved in? Going back to my state's laws, it is perfectly legal for someone with a permit to carry a concealed firearm in airport terminals as long as they are doing it on the non-secure side of the checkpoints. A permitee who does that would not become the 43rd incident.

Or, is the number 43 a completely exaggerated number that the TSA made up?

These are very reasonable questions to ask for the fact that TSA has a 10-year record of lying to the public.

M Sickels, Retired Military said...

I wish to thank the TSA for doing their job and intercepting all these weapons. With the number of weapons being intercepted I am wondering is this a test of TSA security by anti government forces in order to see if they could again overtake a plane or plane(s). With the volume being found, I also wonder are they probing for a weak link in the security net. It seems odd with all the information about not carrying weapons on planes that so many people are still attempting to board planes with them on their possession.

Anonymous said...

You found a metallic throwing star using a body scanner. First, you would have found it with a metal detector too and second, it is not a threat to an airplane, at least not any more than thousands of sharp objects that can be found inside the "sterile" area.

Why do you need the body scanners again?

Sandra said...

M.Sickels, Retired Military - paranoid much?

screen shot

SB said...

M Sickels, I point you to this article from 1985.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=57UzAAAAIBAJ&sjid=oTIHAAAAIBAJ&pg=4844,6538112

Nearly thirty years ago, the lowly metal detector and bag x-ray were finding more guns on passengers than the TSA claims to find today.

So passengers claiming to have forgotten they have their gun on them is nothing new.

Bankimkumar said...

Very good work, I appreciate this, please continue. At least you stopped some terrorist activities and saved American lives

Al Gold said...

As a Brit, I feel alarmed at how comfortable American citizens are with dangerous items like grenades and stun devices. It's a funny old world...

Anonymous said...

This "news" for the week implies that the syringe is a prohibited item. It isn't.

Diabetic syringes are kept in pouches along with insulin. I have a feeling that the TSA agent had no idea what diabetes was and roughly shoved his/ her hand into the pouch. I have never heard of a diabetic packing syringes without a cap.

Wintermute said...

Bankimkumar said...
"Very good work, I appreciate this, please continue. At least you stopped some terrorist activities and saved American lives"

Proof, please?

Anonymous said...

"At least you stopped some terrorist activities and saved American lives"

Nonsense. Not a single one of these items was carried by a terrorist, and no one who was carrying them has a single tie to any terrorist group. The purpose of these blotter reports is to make people think there are endless hordes of terrorists trying to get on planes; that is why Curtis never mentions arrests, charges, or prosecutions, since it would spoil the dishonest illusion his paymasters seek to project.

Anonymous said...

"Al Gold said...
As a Brit, I feel alarmed at how comfortable American citizens are with dangerous items like grenades and stun devices. It's a funny old world..."

Hence the reason why we were able to secede from GB. 226 later, the British Army has returned as TSA officers.

Anonymous said...

The guy who said TSA doesn't know if his bag had a bomb seems to have had a good point. Is it now against the rules to tell the truth?

Anonymous said...

Andrea Abbott was convicted of speaking the truth to TSA employees while trying to protect her daughter. While it may not be appropriate to hold up other passengers, I for one will not hesitate to tell TSA employees exactly what I think of them and their "so-called" professional colleagues. If TSA employees do not like the feedback, they can find another job.

The TSA needs to be reminded of an old expression, "if you walk like a duck and quack like a duck, you're probably a duck".

Anonymous said...

Of course these weekly recitations of items that could have been found with measures in place before the TSA are all we're going to see on this blog.

This blog apparently is meant as a public relations tool to improve the image of an agency that has otherwise done everything it can possibly do to earn scorn, distrust, and derision. It's dedicated to putting a positive spin on everything the TSA does, and particularly to spinning away numerous reports of TSA malfeasance and incompetence. It's all about putting a happy human face on Frankenstein's ugly monster, putting lipstick on a pig, or any other similar metaphor you choose.

But like everything else the TSA does, this blog has been a disastrous failure at its PR mission. It responds to accounts of screener misconduct or incompetence by defending the screeners and the TSA, and blaming the passenger for either causing the problem or lying. It doesn't respond at all to accounts of serious failures, such as the bribery of screeners to allow drug smuggling, racial profiling to meet TSA quotas, or (most recently) the Dunaj incident.

Bob will not hesitate to contort, stretch, or even ignore the truth as he dutifully insists that the TSA is incapable of error. The condescension in so many posts only shows that the contempt and arrogance so often displayed at airport checkpoints represents the official institutional policy of the TSA. Having placed itself above the laws and restrictions that apply to all other government agencies, the TSA seems to have empowered itself to redefine words like "integrity," "respect," and "professional." It apparently has also redefined "public relations" to mean "arrogance" and "condescension."

Getting back to this blog, the TSA now seems to have reached a point where the its complete lack of integrity is too visible to ignore. Serious failures are occurring and getting reported faster than the TSA can sweep them under the rug. As another comment noted, even John Pistole felt it necessary to issue an admonition about "the prompt reporting of misconduct, lapses in integrity and ethics." (But the referenced article still shows that spinning the problems away remains a higher priority than solving them. And we'll surely never see John Pistole acknowledging his own responsibility for his agency's many problems. At the heart of the TSA's institutional DNA is the Mandate to evade accountability for anything.)

Failures like bribery of screeners, racial profiling quotas, and the incompetent mistreatment of a cancer patient can't be defended, excused, denied, or blamed on passengers. Even Bob can't contort them into the blog's official Message that the TSA is always right. It's now clear that the pig is so ugly that lipstick will only spotlight the ugliness. So the only recourse is to say nothing, and hope that the weekly tallies of "successes" will somehow convince some of us that the TSA is keeping aviation safe.

Since the TSA has empowered itself to nullify the Fourth Amendment, we can also assume that it has also repealed the Fifth Amendment. We can therefore interpret Bob's silence on so many recent serious incidents and reports as the TSA's admission of guilt.

Anonymous said...

"An Officer at Tucson (TUS) was stuck by a syringe while searching a bag. This is one of the reasons our officers ask if you have anything sharp or dangerous in your bags before they search them. "
=================================

I've had my carry-on bag searched on a number of occasions and I can't recall a TSO ever asking me if there was anything sharp or dangerous.

Anonymous said...

The purpose of these blotter reports is to make people think there are endless hordes of terrorists trying to get on planes; that is why Curtis never mentions arrests, charges, or prosecutions, since it would spoil the dishonest illusion his paymasters seek to project.

This may be yet another example of how Bob's silence tells us a lot more than whatever he deigns to include in his condescending posts.

If TSA screening ever did catch an actual terrorist, the TSA's propaganda department would be crowing so loudly that we'd all be deaf.

If a TSA "catch" resulted in even an arrest on charges relating to a threat to aviation, Bob would be posting an effusively self-congratulatory post proclaiming the long-awaited victory over the millions of critics his agency has worked so hard to create.

Such announcements are what Bob and his bosses dream about as they wait for the Big Success that finally vindicates the TSA and silences the critics. But that has not happened in 11 years, despite the continuing very costly expansion of the TSA's intrusive "layers."

The best they can brag about is their weekly tally of items that could have been detected by the system in place before 9/11. If they're really lucky, they'll be able to brag about a handful of drugs (or even artfully concealed toothpaste) they found while searching for contraband liquids. While those finds did nothing to protect aviation, it's the best they can offer as a suggestion that they just might be able to stop any bomb-toting terrorist who happened to stumble into one of their checkpoints.

For that matter, given the millions of passengers they screen weekly, finding 42 guns and a handful of "inert grenades etc." only gives reason to doubt the effectiveness of screening. The small number means either that they're failing to find a much larger number of weapons that are carried onto planes, or else the threat posed by those weapons is vastly overstated. (The former case would imply the latter, since we don't see any reports of people using all those guns on planes.)

Either way, the TSA are offering us no convincing evidence to support their claim of providing highly effective protection against the terrorist threat. There's certainly no evidence that we're getting anything for what the TSA cost us, in convenience, liberty, and privacy along with all the billions of dollars.

Each week, Bob posts these unimpressive tallies that only strengthen the case for disbanding the TSA as an ineffective waste of time and money. I don't know whether it's ignorance or arrogance that prevents Bob and his bosses from recognizing that.

Anonymous said...

There is little more annoying than being delayed at the airport because someone decides to take contraband on an airplane or gets pulled aside for an abnormality. People that cause a delay should be fined and punished to the full extent of the law.

RB said...

I've had my carry-on bag searched on a number of occasions and I can't recall a TSO ever asking me if there was anything sharp or dangerous.

October 30, 2012 3:38 PM
..........
What Bob leaves out is that no single TSA checkpoint does things like the others.

TSA employees are so poorly trained or just untrainable that most TSA screeners seem to be making it up as they go.

Anonymous said...

To all those posting on this blog, i would invite you to consider the following:

There is a lot of anger and skepticism targeted at Bob here, and for good reason. This blog, as well as the TSA itself, is complete garbage. We all know this. I'm sure BOB even knows this. But here's the thing. "follow the money". Bob gets PAID to do this, so he does. We don't know what Bobs true feelings are, and it's doubtful that he would tell us if, like all of us, he sees the TSA as a useless, ineffective charade.

My point is, that complaining to Bob does nothing, as he has no power to actually do anything about the TSA. No complaints on this blog are read by anyone in a position to do anything about the TSA. This blog is a lightning rod to distract you from doing what might actually have an effect, which is contacting your elected officials. Sure, getting ahold of Senator Whats-his-nose is FAR less convenient and visible than coming here and yelling at Bob.

But then again, you have to wonder why.

Chris Boyce said...

"An Officer at Tucson (TUS) was stuck by a syringe while searching a bag. This is one of the reasons our officers ask if you have anything sharp or dangerous in your bags before they search them."

When I pack my carry-on, I couldn't care less about the safety of any TSA clerk who demands to search it.

Anonymous said...

"It doesn't matter if you have a conceal and carry license, you still cannot carry a firearm on an aircraft. Unless you are a flying LEO. Duh....."

But those with CCWs don't pose much of a risk, do they? Duh...

Anonymous said...

"I wish to thank the TSA for doing their job and intercepting all these weapons. With the number of weapons being intercepted I am wondering is this a test of TSA security by anti government forces in order to see if they could again overtake a plane or plane(s). With the volume being found, I also wonder are they probing for a weak link in the security net. It seems odd with all the information about not carrying weapons on planes that so many people are still attempting to board planes with them on their possession."

Could be but then Occam's razor indicates that it's orders of magnitude more likely to be nothing of the kind.

I'm concerned that as retired military, you might harbor anti-government views. I will suggest that your house be searched without a warrant. Your Constitutional liberties are not important, it's all about safety.

FWIW, active military, 25 years. Perhaps you can google "military officer oath of office" and do some thinking, Mr. Sickels.

Anonymous said...

"I've had my carry-on bag searched on a number of occasions and I can't recall a TSO ever asking me if there was anything sharp or dangerous."

I have been asked and I always answer, "yes." I have no idea what a screener believes to be dangerous or believes to be sharp. The screener wants to get into my bag - it's on him/her to be careful.

Anonymous said...

"As a Brit, I feel alarmed at how comfortable American citizens are with dangerous items like grenades and stun devices. It's a funny old world..."

Then you might want to consider not visiting America. We certainly don't want to go down the disarmament path that the UK has pursued.

Anonymous said...

This blog site is really meant to let the libertarian, malcontent,
mean spirited, unnamed people have a place to vent unkind words and I can see from reading the various posts that this blog site has performed it's task well.

Anonymous said...

An Officer at Tucson (TUS) was stuck by a syringe while searching a bag.

Simple solution: Don't go poking around in peoples bags!!

Anonymous said...

The complainers will always be the complainers. While they want everyone to hear their opinion, they will be the first to criticize and verbally beat up anyone that disagrees.

I do feel safer. This blog only touches the surface and does not tell the whole story. There are a lot of threat the public never hears about.

TSM said...

Anonymous said...
You know that syringe? The TSO probably asked the person (probably a diabetic) who had it if they had anything "sharp and dangerous" in the bag. Diabetics are so used to needles they don't qualify as "dangerous". Logically A true and a False is a False.

But seriously, folks, if you are a diabetic, please make sure you put the safety back on the needle you use for your insulin injections so the TSO's don't get stuck.

October 27, 2012 6:05 AM
------------------
Actually, TSOs ask if there is anything sharp OR dangerous in the bag for just such an eventuality as this. This is tought in basic training. Any TSO NOT asking this question is putting themselves at risk. We have had 2 different TSOs stuck. Both went to the hospital for tests and have to live with the fear that they may contract something down the line. No matter what you think of the screening procedures, would you really want to do that to someone and thier family? Please let us know if there is anything in your bag that may harm us.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I do feel safer.


Well, as long as you feel safer, then that's all right. ::eyeroll::

This blog only touches the surface and does not tell the whole story. There are a lot of threat the public never hears about.

This has been debunked over and over. With all the bad publicity the TSA gets, they would JUMP at the chance to post anything that makes them look better. Like foiling these 'threats' you claim exist.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous,

You may "feel safer," but billions of dollars have been wasted and we are not actually safer.

Dismissing citizens who make critical comments about a government agency is a bit silly, IMHO.

You have issues you feel passionately about, and probably make critical comments about them. Truth, security, privacy, and tax dollar waste are important to many people here. Please respect our right to address these issues with the agency responsible for so many problems on these issues.

Kristen Curtis said...

All these people whining and crying about the TSA are ridiculous! Posting links to articles about TSA abuse and such. What the hell do you people want? You think it'd be better without the TSA?! I think they're doing a pretty good job keeping our airports and skys safe. Let's give them a little gratitude.

Anonymous said...

@Kristen Curtis,

You may "feel safer," but billions of dollars have been wasted and we are not actually safer.

Dismissing citizens who make critical comments about a government agency is a bit silly, IMHO. 

You have issues you feel passionately about, and probably make critical comments about them. Truth, security, privacy, and tax dollar waste are important to many people here. Please respect our right to address these issues with the agency responsible for so many problems on these issues.

Wintermute said...

Kristen Curtis said...

"All these people whining and crying about the TSA are ridiculous! Posting links to articles about TSA abuse and such. What the hell do you people want? You think it'd be better without the TSA?! I think they're doing a pretty good job keeping our airports and skys safe. Let's give them a little gratitude."

First, any relation to Blogger Bob?

Second, we're no whiners. We speak the truth.

Third, we want the TSA to do LEGAL administrative searches that do not violate our constitutional rights. We want them done courteously and professionally. We want the agency to clean it's house and get rid of the thieves, pedophiles, and people with an inferiority complex and a false sense of "authority."

Fourth, yes, we'd be better without the TSA. Security failed on 9/11 because A) the cockpit was easily accessible and B) everyone was told that to survive a terrorist hijacking, comply. These two changed which, combined with pre-TSA methods, are a perfectly acceptable level of security.

Finally, think what you want, but, unless you think that the TSA is a colossal failure in the terms of money wasted and liberties lost, then you'd be wrong ;)

Allen said...

How many terrorists did you stop this year?

Anonymous said...

TSA STOP MOLESTING PEOPLE!
www.infowars.com/optout

Anonymous said...

OPT OUT AND FILM A WEEK!
STOP TSA MOLESTATION AND RADIATING PEOPLE WITH RADIATION FIRING BODY PORNO SCANNERS.

Anonymous said...

TSA is a joke, all of these posts are obviously just fear mongering. But Americans love their fear mongering and false sense of security! If someone really wants to take down a plane, they're gonna figure out how to get a bomb on it. Going through a body scanner or being felt up by some "security" agent won't make any more difference than just an X-ray or metal detector. We citizens need to stop worrying so much about what COULD happen and start worrying about what is actually happening.

Anonymous said...

The fact that these comments are moderated is a huge slap in the face for the first amendment.

Anonymous said...

BOB, You just said that the TSA weren't looking for drugs?

Anonymous said...

In 1972 I had my carry-on searched because the Chop Sticks I Had in my bag looked like Small Daggers. Now I see that you can carry on Knitting / Crocheting Needles. You can do more damage with them than a throwing star...

Boriss Sebjakins said...

A few days ago, I flew from Newark and passed the bag as luggage. Before that, packed it with transparent film to protect from damage. Got a suitcase in Vilnius in bulk and obviously be monitored. The result - a ragged tail of zipper and other minor damages. I am absolutely certain that my suitcase could be checked X-rays, without the opening. It was not anything that would cause even the slightest interest of the security services. In general, anything pleasant from distance communication with TSA I did not receive. Although, of course, I understand that this service is very important for the safety of air transport. But the methods of work might be more accurate. Especially when you consider how much money is spent on various equipment, which should make the control less intrusive to the passengers.