Wednesday, July 11, 2012

TSA Pre✓™ Expands to Charlotte and Tampa


TSA Precheck Logo
Charlotte (CLT) - TSA Pre✓™ is now available for select US Airways frequent flyers and  CBP Trusted Traveler members at Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT). American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and United Airlines are also operational at CLT.

Tampa (TPA) - Also, TSA Pre✓™ operations for select US Airways frequent flyers and  CBP Trusted Traveler members are live at TPA.

Did you know that kids 12 and under can travel with you through the TSA Pre✓™ lane? If you didn't, now you know! That info might come in handy this summer.

In case you're wondering what TSA Pre✓™ is, you can go here to read all about it. Long story short, it's an initiative that allows passengers to expedite their screening experience if they opt in. How do you opt in to TSA Pre✓™? Funny you should ask. Just go here

Here are some other TSA Pre✓™ posts that might interest you:

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.
 


41 comments:

Anonymous said...

Ah, the government-sanctioned protection money racket goes on unabated.

Anonymous said...

"This blog is sponsored by the Transportation Security Administration to facilitate an ongoing dialogue …".

Bob, it's not a dialog when only one side does the asking of questions.

Scott said...

TSA Pre✓ is simply a form of extortion so the American people can get their 4th amendments rights back. I wonder what would happen if I asked a TSA agent to give me $100 so I "possibly" won't pat them down? We are no safer because of the TSA, we need to get rid of them.

RB said...

TSA Pre-Check is not a risked based screening system.

TSA Pre Check does nothing for the vast majority of travelers, nothing at all.

TSA Pre Check is another clear indication of total TSA Failure.

Eight Billion dollars each year down the TSA rathole.

TSA: No Vision, No Purpose

John 05B4S said...

I submitted my application on May 8, 2012, and am still waiting for my interview appointment.

Anonymous said...

What this information says to me is that Pre-Check is available to, one, a private citizen wealthy enough to own a US Airways frequent flyer account, or, two, a private citizen who works for a company and flies for free. Why is this limited to US Airways Frequent Flyer anyway and not Delta?
Bottom line, this sounds pretty class-ist.

Anonymous said...

How is approval for blog posts determined? Please tell me you search for swear words and slang, and not for critical remarks about TSA.

Adrian said...

I've been following the TSA and Global Entry links in circles. Is there a page or publicly-available document that explains what information someone must give up to the government to qualify for PreCheck? Is there a privacy policy for PreCheck?

Adrian said...

Can you cite any studies that demonstrate any sort of correlation between information PreCheck collects and the risk of a person having terrorist intentions?

Everything I ever read about the de-funded Total Information Awareness program (later called Terrorist Information Awareness) said that no good correlations were ever found. That's not surprising. Since there are very, very few terrorists. Statistically, it would be extremely difficult to find any sort of correlation.

What information could PreCheck candidates possibly reveal about themselves that would demonstrate that they are less risk than the non-PreCheck passenger?

With all the talk about risk-based approaches, I'd like to see some evidence that there's actually some risk-based analysis going on.

Anonymous said...

No one should have to remove shoes and jackets to go through security. Every day, hundreds of passengers fly over the US without removing shoes or jackets, because they boarded in other countries, with reasonable security measures. Shoes and jackets are not dangerous.

Anonymous said...

Require the Transportation Security Administration to Follow the Law!

In July 2011, a federal appeals court ruled that the Transportation Security Administration had to conduct a notice-and-comment rulemaking on its policy of using "Advanced Imaging Technology" for primary screening at airports. TSA was supposed to publish the policy in the Federal Register, take comments from the public, and justify its policy based on public input. The court told TSA to do all this "promptly." A year later, TSA has not even started that public process. Defying the court, the TSA has not satisfied public concerns about privacy, about costs and delays, security weaknesses, and the potential health effects of these machines. If the government is going to "body-scan" Americans at U.S. airports, President Obama should force the TSA to begin the public process the court ordered.

Particulary relevant because:


The reason for the delay, stated in a filing with the court last year, was the complexity and expense of doing a rulemaking in this area. But ... the TSA has devoted substantial resources to the PreCheck program during this time, rolling it out to additional airports. How can an agency pour resources into its latest greatest project yet claim poverty when it comes to complying with the law?

Anonymous said...

Put the costs with the travelers. Pre is a good start but a one time fee isn't enough. There should be an action fee for each time a traveler goes through security. Pre should allow a discount to by-pass security but regular travelers should pay enough to cover the costs of TSA's security efforts.

If TSA were self-sustaining it would go a long way to improving its image.

Anonymous said...

This is GREAT!!!!!

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "How is approval for blog posts determined? Please tell me you search for swear words and slang, and not for critical remarks about TSA."

The blog comment policy is listed here:

http://blog.tsa.gov/2008/01/comment-policy.html

West
TSA Blog Team

Wintermute said...

GSOLTSO said...
Anon sez - "How is approval for blog posts determined? Please tell me you search for swear words and slang, and not for critical remarks about TSA."

The blog comment policy is listed here:

http://blog.tsa.gov/2008/01/comment-policy.html


I'm pretty sure that's not what anon meant. We know the policies, but even so, the TSA blog team tends to censor posts on a regular basis even though they fit within the policy.

Mike Toreno said...

West, no, not what the policy is. The question was, how IS approval for blog posts determined? Not what the policy SAYS about how approval is SUPPOSED to be determined.

The TSA policy SAYS that TSA employees are supposed to know how to do their jobs. But they don't. The TSA policy SAYS cremated remains aren't supposed to be opened. But they are. The TSA policy SAYS TSA employees aren't supposed to steal iPads. But they do.

So never mind what the blog comment policy is. How is approval ACTUALLY DETERMINED? Or does it have to be unpredictable to keep terrorists from gaming the system?

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Anon sez - "How is approval for blog posts determined? Please tell me you search for swear words and slang, and not for critical remarks about TSA."

The blog comment policy is listed here:

http://blog.tsa.gov/2008/01/comment-policy.html

West
TSA Blog Team

July 12, 2012 7:03 AM
................
Where do employees of the TSA, an agency of the federal government, derive the authority to censor citizens free speech, a violation of the United States Constitution, that all federal employees swear to uphold?

Seems like a firing offense to me.

RB said...

"This blog is sponsored by the Transportation Security Administration to facilitate an ongoing dialogue on innovations in security, technology and the checkpoint screening process."

..............
Since we seem to be talking about TSA policy when will TSA update the TSA Blog Purpose Statement since there is no dialogue, ongoing or even momentary, happening on the TSA Blog?

Who in TSA is responsible for the total failure of the TSA Blog to meet its stated objectives?

Anonymous said...

"Who in TSA is responsible for the total failure of the TSA Blog to meet its stated objectives?"

When did failure to meet stated objectives ever stop anyone else at the TSA?

Bob, what is the budget for the TSA social media team? How much does maintaining this blog cost us taxpayers?

Or is that information SSI and divulging it would give an edge to the terrorists?

Anonymous said...

@RB: Since we seem to be talking about TSA policy when will TSA update the TSA Blog Purpose Statement since there is no dialogue, ongoing or even momentary, happening on the TSA Blog?

That actually is the TSA policy. It clearly states the purpose of the blog, along with the criteria for comment moderation. In other words, it states what the TSA is supposed to be doing. Bob's remarks about what should happen at checkpoints to evade accountability for incidents where TSA employees fail to follow procedures are frequently featured on this blog.

But since this blog is run by the TSA, what we actually experience when interacting with it differs significantly from what the policy says. And it's wildly inconsistent. Sometimes lots of comments get posted. Other times lots of comments don't get posted. (Although there's nothing truly resembling "dialogue." Bob throws us a new piece of bait. Then he stands back and watches us go at it in comments. He surely gets a lot of pleasure from watching the futile expressions of outrage, and perhaps sharing it with his fellow TSOs as a way to reinforce their contempt for the public who "just don't get it.")

The TSA employees who operate this blog are simply doing the same thing other TSA employees do. They're interpreting the policy and moderation criteria in whatever capricious and inconsistent fashion they feel like at the moment. Since the TSA touts their "unpredictability" as an essential layer of security, it should not be surprising that they'd apply this approach to things other than airport screening. What we're seeing here is merely the TSA's institutional contempt for the public.

The only difference is that the policies and moderation criteria are openly published. They can't hide behind the secrecy of their other rules and procedures to spin away violations.

Anonymous said...

"Where do employees of the TSA, an agency of the federal government, derive the authority to censor citizens free speech, a violation of the United States Constitution, that all federal employees swear to uphold?"

Easily explained: For TSA employees, the oath is not taken seriously.

Anonymous said...

The TSA stated they would implement privacy scanners across all airports...they have NOT.


The TSA stated they would implement expedited screening for military personnel...they have NOT.


The TSA states they hold their workforce to "the highest professional and ethical standards"...they have NOT.


The TSA Pre program will also be a failure because this agency doesn't follow through on any promises made to American taxpayers. What's even worse is that our disconnected elected leaders are obviously clueless as to how to rein in and re-organize this disgraced and failed agency.


Americans MUST contact their elected leaders and demand overall change at the TSA. Americans MUST vote for leaders who believe law-abiding citizens deserve dignity and respect when traveling through US airports.

Anonymous said...

Bob, why is a passenger who flies 100,000 miles a year all on Delta, and therefore has elite status, considered less of a threat than the same passenger who also flies 100,000 miles but scattered across several airlines, and has no status on any one airline?

The only way for the second passenger to be eligible would be to pay the $100 for one of the trusted traveler programs.

How about a typical passenger who might take a half-dozen flights per year, and has done so, uneventfully, for the past 20 years? Why is that passenger considered more of a risk than the road warrior who has taken 50 flights per year but for only the past two years?

Why is the federal government in the business of giving benefits to citizens who choose to patronize certain private companies (the airlines)?

Bob, if you think that PreCheck is a "risk-based" screening scheme, you're quite naive.

It's a way for TSA administrators to shut up the most frequent travelers, who might be the ones to most complain. The same reason why kids' shoes suddenly become potentially explosive at age 12 and they have to be removed. Or why at age 75, they suddenly stop becoming explosive.

You should be ashamed to cash your TSA paycheck every other week. In doing so, you're supporting one of the most despised agencies in generations.

[Screenshot taken. Will be sent to appropriate legislators if this post is censored.]

Anonymous said...

..."TSA has zero tolerance for discrimination of any kind...."

As a person with a slight disability who wears a brace....I find this statement to be absolutely false!

Anonymous said...

"[PreCheck] a way for TSA administrators to shut up the most frequent travelers, who might be the ones to most complain."

That is my thought on the subject as well.

Anonymous said...

This is idiotic. This should be the default level of screening for EVERY passenger, not the elite few who can buy into the program. You people are pathetic.

Anonymous said...

The DHS was happy to take my $100 fee when I applied...

...and more than a month later, I'm still waiting for an appointment, or any indication at all that my application has been reviewed.

Can you please provide us with some useful information, such as how long this process is expected to take?

(For normal people, I mean... apparently TSA employees are "fast tracked", as your guest blogger Lisa Farbstein was all too happy to gloat about in the "One Sweet Deal" post.)

Anonymous said...

Silly little people acting like children, TSA is on the new front lines,their professional and hard working, believe me, it's not easy having and maintaining a "Secret Clearance" and you people do nothing but cry, you never been in the military nor did you lose loved ones on 9/11 this much is TRUE and a fact. Do your fair share and understand their there for your safety and that of your family, stop crying. It gets old.

Anonymous said...

>> nor did you lose loved ones on 9/11 …

Too bad that the sister of the pilot of one of the hijacked planes thinks that the TSA is a sham too --

http://www.911familiesforamerica.org/?p=6141

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"Silly little people acting like children, TSA is on the new front lines,their professional and hard working, believe me, it's not easy having and maintaining a "Secret Clearance" and you people do nothing but cry, you never been in the military nor did you lose loved ones on 9/11 this much is TRUE and a fact. Do your fair share and understand their there for your safety and that of your family, stop crying. It gets old."

Yet another pro-TSA comment that violates stated comment guidelines by resorting to ad hominen attacks, while comments fitting within guidelines continue to be censored. But since the TSA accepted it, I'll "feed the troll," so to speak ;)

A) I have never once cried because of the TSA, so the statement is factually incorrect.

B) I have served in the USAF, so the statement is factually incorrect.

C) TSA is not on the "new front lines (other three-letter agencies are)," so the statement is factually incorrect.

D) Not all TSAgents are professional and hard working, so this statement is factually incorrect. (also, it's "they're" for "they are," not "their." This grammatical mistake is repeated multiple times.)

E) The statement claims to be "TRUE and a fact," which, aside from the redundancy, is factually incorrect. While certain parts of the statement might be true, it is mostly filled with uninformed opinion, which is exactly the opposite of "TRUE and a fact."

This comment is on-topic to the previous comment which was approved, so should be approved as well in the interest of ongoing dialog. The only thing that can remotely be construed as an insult is my opinion that the previous comment was by an Internet troll.

Anonymous said...

Dear anonymous poster of 7/13/12:

I do not believe that I am one of the individuals that you classify as a "silly little" person. I was a reservist who served abroad.

I applied to the Global Entry program in accordance with the DHS's policies. And yet I am still waiting for my approval. I am one of the individuals who helped to work to keep this country free, and yet I wait for the government to approve my means to move about free in this country.

Anonymous said...

First, I am a management consultant of a private firm- not a government employee or TSA cronie. So save your breath- this is about commen sense and recognizing a good idea that makes your travel easier.

In the last 8 years as a frequent business traveler, I've learned how to make my travel less stressful and more efficient. Some of this was achieved through behavior modifications (carry on bags only, packing more efficiently, arriving early, eating before arriving at the airport, etc.). I've also opted into pre-screened security programs (remember clear pass- the private version of Pre check?) I can say without a doubt that the $100 spent on GOES, which automatically enrolls me for Pre check has had the biggest positive impact. Like it or not - and to be clear I do not- the TSA screening process is slow and arduous. With Pre check, I breeze through in 5-10 minutes, dont break a sweat, don't have to wait behind inexperienced travelers, and generally get to my gate more relaxed.

So far as not liking TSA screening process, I am with many of the commenters here- I feel that they are misguided, inefficient, unintelligent, and wasteful. I was actually mistakenly put on a watchlist some years back and went through hell to get off. In general, I do not like the TSA. But that is a different post alltogether. Pay the $100, enter the program, use your dollars as your speech. The more people who sign into Pre check, the more lanes TSA has to dedicate to Pre check screening. Ultimately, this will reduce the number of agents they have to employ, lower cost, and decrease the average screening time of the airport as a whole. Complaining will do nothing. Volunteering for a background check is not a violation of privacy, and certainly seems better than submitting to longer, randomized searches. The $100 covers the cost of the background check, interview, and management of IT infrastructure for GOES (which has to do with pre-clearing customs, not TSA security). The process was easy, it's a nominal fee, and the TSA component is actually free for me- it's the GOES that I paid for.

Bottom line, if getting through the airport with less hassle is your priority, Pre check makes sense. Next let's get the airlines to drop these silly bag fees and priority bording to bring back good manners and civility to flying.

Anonymous said...

Well, if it works well- how come I, as a global entry level, got zero TSA pre options out of 10+ domestic only flights this year on TSA pre airports line?
(and I removed flights that did not originate in TSA pre airports, flights with international connections, etc.)

There has to be a way to communicate with TSA and request some accountablility. Or not?

Anonymous said...

"Silly little people acting like children, TSA is on the new front lines,their professional and hard working, believe me, "

Speaking of silly, the word (contraction really) you were looking for is "they're."


it's not easy having and maintaining a "Secret Clearance" and you people do nothing but cry, you never been in the military nor did you lose loved ones on 9/11 this much is TRUE and a fact.

You must be joking. First, few if any screeners have a clearance. Second, a collateral secret clearance requires a National Agency Check which is akin to looking for any outstanding warrants or convictions. You also can't have unreported bankruptcies or related misconduct. Other than that, pretty much a slam dunk.

"Do your fair share and understand their there for your safety and that of your family, stop crying. It gets old."

I am a 25 year still-serving member of the military. I have worked counterterrorism and security issues. What the TSA does provides very little, if any, security to the US.

Anonymous said...

Over a week since my last post, and still no response from anyone regarding how long it's supposed to take to get some sort of response out of the Global Entry program after I submitted my application and paid the fee.

Come on, guys, we know you're reading these posts; you have to in order to approve them.

How about supplying us with some useful information about how long this process is supposed to take... or at least explain why some of us have been waiting months while a TSA employee gets hers approved in a matter of days?

Anonymous said...

Well, the reality is at TPA TSA pre-check is open for DL, not US AIR. As in 2 independent airlines in entirely independent terminals.
If you fail to get basic facts correct, how can we trust you (don't worry, we don't) on some of the more nuanced issues you try and grapple with?
Screen Shot

Anonymous said...

I am a member of the global entry trusted traveler and pre. last week, handed my ticket to the agent in the pre line, and he sent me to a non -pre line 3times in length. getting up the x-ray machines, the agent said no more people thru the regular x-ray and i refused the body scan. he said body scan or go home. so i went thru the body scan. did i mention I was military and the pilot of the airline.... great job once again!!

Anonymous said...

Excellent to expand to TPA, my home base. Great program, especially at busier airports such as ORD and JFK. I travel more than 125,000 a year, and in conjunction with Global Entry, this is a boon for REAL frequent travelers.

Anonymous said...

For the poster who was sent to the non-pre check line 3x, double check with the airline you were flying on. If the airline sends your name to TSA and this doesn't exactly match what they have on file, you won't get through. This happened to me 3 X at JFK with AA. Turns out my middle initial was not included in my AA reservations, which was the disconnect. After correcting this, I always get through. Remember, it is the airline that sends your info to TSA, so check with them.

Anonymous said...

Global Entry and TSA pre-check are 2 different programs and unfortunately, the 2 don;t talk with each other. Contact CBP for Global Entry about timing. I enrolled last year and it only took 2 weeks for initial approval and my interview was the week after. Probably taking longer now since more folks are applying.

Anonymous said...

Tampa Only for Delta??

When is Pre-Check coming to Terminal F, which is where American Airlines and USAir are located. Both airlines have Pre-Check at many other airports except Tampa.