Monday, July 23, 2012

My TSA Mobile App Now Available on Android!


Android My TSA ApplicationFor all the Android users out there, I wanted to let you know that the My TSA App, previously available for iPhone and mobile web users, is now available at Google Play.

The My TSA App provides passengers with 24/7 access to the most commonly requested TSA information.
  • Airport Status: Users can see what airports are experiencing general delays (not flight specific) or search for conditions at a specific airport. This information is provided by the FAA.
  • ‘Can I Bring?’: Users can type in an item they plan to bring on a trip to find out if it is permitted or prohibited, and whether they can pack it in carry-on or checked bags.
  • Guide: Users can get travel tips on an array of some of the most popular topics of air travel, including traveling with children, 3-1-1 rules for liquids, gels and aerosols, special medical needs, packing tips, tips for how to dress for airport security, tips for military members, and traveling with food and gifts.
  • Security wait times: My TSA gives passengers the ability to share their wait time and see what wait times other passengers have posted for U.S. airports.
  • Contacting TSA:  If a user can’t find information they need on the app or the TSA website or wants to provide feedback, they can contact the TSA Contact Center by phone or email by clicking the “About” button on the main page of the app.
For more info on the apps, you can go to our blog, or web page.

Also, we recently updated our template for the TSA Blog, and since doing so, it is now mobile-friendly. 
 

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

18 comments:

Jim Huggins said...

Of course, there is no such thing as a "permitted item", since any TSO can prohibit a passenger from bringing any item through a checkpoint, at any time, for any reason --- even if it appears on the "permitted list". (sigh)

Anonymous said...

So, what happens when I go to the airport and one of your fellow TSA clerks tell that I am not allowed a certain item through the checkpoint? I whip out my smartphone and show him/her the app and how that item is allowed. Their reply, "sorry, the website is out of date." What then?

Anonymous said...

Will this app be updated with the latest information? If I show it to a TSA worker, will they believe the information on the screen? There are many people who have been told that the TSA website is out of date, or that the printouts from the website are fake. Does this app also say that photography and filming is allowed at the checkpoint? That is another issue that not all of your employees are aware of those rules.

RB said...

If the Mobile App says I can bring medically needed food will that keep the TSA screeners at DAL from confiscating it?

Anonymous said...

You keep on inventing ways to push critical stories out of public view. What's next -- Pistole's birthday or something?

Anonymous said...

Why would any person want to talk to the TSA? It's obvious that the TSA never accepts responsibility for the continual stream of sordid passenger issues. Furthermore, I, like many Americans, refuse to download apps from organizations that have earned tainted and disgraced reputations.

Anonymous said...

It's good you're using the latest technology to provide passengers with immediate access to the official published rules that should apply at checkpoints. Unfortunately, that's all useless when screeners have complete authority to arbitrarily interpret or even ignore the published rules.

I'm sure that the app would prove completely worthless when a passenger is in the all too common situation where the rule in effect at this checkpoint, at this moment, contradicts what the app says. If the passenger commits the unforgivable offense of pointing out the contradiction, the officer will act appropriately by bellowing "Do you want to fly today?"

You should withdraw the app until you hold screeners accountable for knowing the rules and applying them consistently. Otherwise, the app will just add to the frustration of screening when an officer blatantly disregards what the app says (but, of course, the officer always acts properly when doing so).

Anonymous said...

Only if it's very belated- it was June 1st.

JMF said...

Nice job! TSA-

Great Idea..

Chris Boyce said...

Are you going to search my iPhone looking for "identification media"???

http://tinyurl.com/c6qswyo

Anonymous said...

Bob, Until the search engine used in this app is improved it's basically useless.
Type in "Can I take ice (as in frozen water) with me?" and the link that pops up is for "Service Animals". Took me a minute to realize that since they share "ICE" in the words, this is what happens. This isn't good.
And this new CAPTCHA system is still horrible!

Anonymous said...

I hadn’t had the chance to try it before. Now that I can use it on my Android, I gave it a go. I found it pretty useful even though I am a seasoned traveler. I have recommended to all my friends, especially the parents.

Anonymous said...

I asked it if I could take my dignity through the checkpoint. It advised me that dignity wasn't on the permitted items list.

I guess you really did release something that is accurate.

screenshot

Anonymous said...

This is a very impressive and useful app! The reviews by users (on "Google Play" site) are predominantly favorable and probably more relevant than the snide comments by TSA-haters who seem to spend a lot of their free time posting here :)

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...

"...probably more relevant than the snide comments by TSA-haters who seem to spend a lot of their free time posting here :)"

You say TSA-haters, I say freedom-lovers. Actually, most anti-TSA comments on this blog are reasoned arguments. Most pro-TSA comments blindly defend the TSA without much real thought. There are exceptions to that on both sides, mind you, but those are few and far between. The anti-TSA crowd seem to be concerned that A) there are health risks associated with the nude-o-scopes, but TSA refuses to allow independent testing. B) they're also ineffective. C) it's all smoke-and-mirrors, which actually makes us LESS safe. D) the pat-downs are degrading and go beyond anything reasonable for someone presumed innocent (even police pat-downs are not as invasive) and would be considered sexual assault in any other context (remember, TSOs, "just following orders" is no excuse). E) they violate our civil liberties. and finally, F) they cost a helluva lot of money for all of the above. The pro-TSA argument seems to be "There haven't been any planes fall from the sky since 9/11," but they fail to realize that correlation does not imply causation. In other words, just because no planes fell from the sky does not mean the TSA is doing a good job. It's just coincidence. (Actually, evidence suggests it's heightened passenger awareness, but let's not let the pesky evidence inform our thoughts.)

I notice TSA if censoring many of my comments again, even though they comply with posted guidelines. Screenshot taken.

Anonymous said...

Have faced the similar issue with me carrying the Justdial parcel and they say so and so things are not allowed. I showed them the app and the update but they say its neither valid nor verified update hence had to fight for the right.

daniel Jackson said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
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