Wednesday, February 8, 2012

TSA Pre✓™ Pilot to Expand to 28 of the Busiest US Airports

TSA Pre✓™ logo.
Earlier today, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano and Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Administrator John S. Pistole announced the expansion of TSA Pre™ to 28 additional airports across the country following the success at seven pilot locations. Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Atlanta, Detroit, Miami, and New York JFK.

As part of the initiative’s expansion, TSA Pre™ will be rolling out at the following 28 airport locations this year:
- Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI)
- Boston Logan International Airport (BOS)
- Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT)
- Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG)
- Denver International Airport (DEN)
- Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL)
- George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH)
- Honolulu International Airport (HNL)
- Indianapolis International Airport (IND)
- LaGuardia Airport (LGA)
- Lambert-St. Louis International Airport (STL)
- Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (MSY)
- Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport (SJU)
- Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR)
- O’Hare International Airport (ORD)
- Orlando International Airport (MCO)
- Philadelphia International Airport (PHL)
- Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX)
- Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT)
- Portland International Airport (PDX)
- Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA)
- Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC)
- San Francisco International Airport (SFO)
- Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA)
- Tampa International Airport (TPA)
- Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC)
- Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD)
Considering all the great feedback we’ve received, I imagine this will be very welcome news to many of the frequent flyers out there, including the 336,000 passengers who have already been screened through a TSA Prelane. TSA will continue expanding TSA Pre™ to additional airlines and airports once they’re ready to go.

If you want to learn how to sign up for TSA Pre✓™, click here. Eligible participants include certain frequent flyers from participating airlines as well as members of Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Trusted Traveler programs (Global Entry, SENTRI, and NEXUS) who are U.S. citizens and fly on a participating airline. Individuals interested in participating in the pilot can apply via Global Entry at http://www.globalentry.gov/.

For those who might not be familiar with TSA Pre✓™, there’s lots of info on our blog and on TSA.gov. This screening concept enhances security by enabling TSA to focus its efforts on passengers the agency knows less about while providing expedited screening for travelers who volunteer information about themselves prior to flying.

If TSA determines a passenger is eligible for expedited screening following the TSA Pre™ vetting process, information will be embedded in the barcode of the passenger’s boarding pass. TSA will read the barcode at the security checkpoint and then may refer the passenger to a TSA Pre™ lane, where they will undergo expedited screening, which could include no longer removing the following items:
Shoes
3-1-1 compliant bag from carry-on
Laptop from bag
Light outerwear/jacket
Belt
TSA will always incorporate random and unpredictable security measures throughout the airport and no individual will be guaranteed expedited screening.

TSA Pre✓™ will join other elements of risk-based security currently under way including:
All of these initiatives are designed to improve our security approach while enhancing the passenger’s security experience. We thank U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the airlines, and passengers for their partnership as we work to provide the most effective transportation security in the most efficient way.  

If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

59 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thank you TSA. Doing a little dance as I hold my phone.

Anonymous said...

Did I read that this costs money to sign up for? Did I read that correctly? I have to pay EXTRA so you can DO LESS? Please tell me I misread the $50 fee.

Anonymous said...

Since shoes, liquids, laptops, jackets, and belts present no threat to anyone, anywhere, why do you people insist on requiring ANYONE to remove them in the first place?

Can you name a single country that requires every passenger to remove their shoes the way TSA does?

Matt said...

Can you say awesome. I fly out of Tampa all of the time this is great news.

Anonymous said...

I personally can't wait for a politician to run an ad in 2012 election season depicting a TSA "patdown" with the caption of "Land of the Free?"

Brian E. said...

Yessssss!!

Jim Huggins said...

And when will the rest of us --- who aren't massive frequent flyers or Trusted Traveler members --- get the chance to qualify for this program?

Anonymous said...

No one should have to remove shoes, laptops, belts or jackets. There is no reason to limit the liquid state of matter for anyone.

Screen everyone equally, and reasonably.

By limiting this to US-national frequent fliers for specific carrieirs you are just making life more miserable for the rest of us.

Roger McGuinn said...

hey guys..tried this in Miami in December and they declared it not available. TSA needs to educate the security folks.

Roger McGuinn said...

We tried to use our GOES in Miami in Dec. The security folks looked at us like we were nuts! Time to educate the folks who work for the nation...

Anonymous said...

Now that the Senate has passed the FAA bill which overrides TSA's cap on airport security services replacement, do you expect any impact on this program as airports choose safer, less expensive, more professional, replacement of TSA's function?

Anonymous said...

How can this be? I demand more safety!!! Please protect us from the terrorists, i mean business travelers and their nail files and sport coats!

Seriously? You lied to us about how everything you do is ABSOLUTELY necessary. And now you relax the security and act like everything is fine.

At least admit that your security measures weren't necessary.

RB said...

Remove Shoes- adds nothing to security

remove 3-1-1 compliant bag from carry-on- adds nothing to security

Remove Laptop from bag- adds nothing to security

Remove Light outerwear/jacket- adds nothing to security.

remove Belt- adds nothing to security.

What we have here are stupid and unreasonable actions that contribute nothing to passenger security.

If TSA was actually a security organization these things would be eliminated completely today for everyone since it is a waste of time and energy to do things that contribute nothing to security.

The reality of facts is that TSA is not a security organization.

Anonymous said...

This entire program is just a way to remove stupid rules without admitting that they were a mistake.

We all know that your per-screening is a joke and it's impossible to identify terrorists that way.

Travelling Nerd said...

Though I applaud the fact that there is an option not to be treated like a terrorist when I fly, I find it a bit cumbersome to submit to yet another privacy invasion in order to be treated like a citizen of this country. And, I have to pay for the privilege of being treated like a citizen?

Sandra said...

Although I realize we will never get an answer from Bob, I'd like to know what percentage of flyers the TSA believes are eligible to participate in this program?

10%, 20%, 30%?

99.9% of flyers should be seen as a non-threat to an aircraft, not an elite few.

screen shot

Anonymous said...

Still nothing about the insulin pump fiasco.

Anonymous said...

Yea... And TSA, moving at the speed of a glacier, finally figures out the obvious! Nice job guys!

Anonymous said...

Frequent flyers are the ones causing you the most headaches, writing to representatives, filing complaints and so on. So you throw them a bone hoping that you will catch a break.

You are so wrong.

TSORon said...

Sandra said...
[[99.9% of flyers should be seen as a non-threat to an aircraft, not an elite few.]]

Assuming that your assumption is accurate about the 99.9%, that still leaves 1,800 passengers every day that fly who intend harm to our nation’s commercial aviation. TSA know that 99.9% of air travelers are not a threat to commercial aviation Sandra. That’s the easy part. Determining which traveler is that 0.1% that actually IS a threat is the hard part. So far no one has come up with an even half decent way to determine who falls into that category that we don’t already know about. They don’t wear signs, or have blinking tattoo’s on their foreheads advising that they intend to harm an aircraft. In fact, they most likely look just like you, or your neighbor, or the principal of your children’s school. Could be the guy behind the counter at the corner gas station, or the night stocker at your local Walmart.

At least the folks who use the Pre-Check program have had significant background checks done and TSA knows more about them than the average passenger. They are not “elite” as you suggest, just people who want to go somewhere with a minimum of fuss and are willing to undergo a little inconvenience in advance to have less in the future.

Anonymous said...

"TSA will always incorporate random and unpredictable..."

So, the traveling public is still at the whim and whimsey of the TSA guards.

Where's the progress?

Michael D said...

DFW was in the pilot plan but I did not see it mentioned in the blog entry.

What is the status of PreTSA at DFW?

Anonymous said...

"99.9% of flyers should be seen as a non-threat to an aircraft, not an elite few."

Sorry, only regarding the actual threats as, well, threats will not employ nearly enough people to ensure that union dues make it to the proper account.

"screen shot"

Haw, haw, haw! You must wear a tinfoil hat!

(let's see if "Bob" approves this one - it mocks a poster satirically but doesn't support the TSA)

(Screen shot captured)

Anonymous said...

Sandra, that IS an interesting question. It will probably depend on how they measure it. However, if they measure it based not on an individual flyer but on the number of "times" that flyers go through the gate then it will probably be a bit higher than you imagine. After all, frequent flyers (business flyers and wealth jetsetters) fly more frequently so their percentage numbers will quickly add up. However, if it's based on actual individuals who fly at any given time the number will probably be low. Personally, I will never qualify for this program because I neither fly for business nor am I wealthy. I'm just the couple of times per year vacation traveler. Jim Huggins asked when people like us will be part of the program. Probably....never.

RB said...

If government is going to collect information on citizens then TSA should publish the list of questions that will asked in order for a person to apply to this program.

We have a right to know what information TSA will be collecting.

Anonymous said...

So, just because one has paid for and been "screened" ahead of time, TSA says they are not a threat like the rest of us are.

First, this is wrong on so many levels and unfair. Second, TSA agents have been "screened" for their jobs as well, and that led to porn, mollesters, and thieves becoming part of TSA. I can't wait to see what kind of passenger this program produces.......

You know, only in America is a murderer who commited his/her crime in front of 20 people, considered guilty untill proven innocent, but walk into an airport and you're a terrorist untill proven otherwise, unless you pay for the privildge to be automatically "safe".

Anonymous said...

TSORon said...
"At least the folks who use the Pre-Check program have had significant background checks done and TSA knows more about them than the average passenger."

Please provide some evidence that this background check is able to identify possible terrorists. I don't believe it's possible, this entire program is based on lies.

Anonymous said...

"Assuming that your assumption is accurate about the 99.9%, that still leaves 1,800 passengers every day that fly who intend harm to our nation’s commercial aviation."

The number of people who fly on any given day "who intend harm to our nation’s commercial aviation" is much, much, much closer to 0 than to 1,800. If it actually WERE 1,800, that's...1800 * 10 * 365 = 6,570,000 times TSA has failed to detect a terrorist! In which case, you're the most incompetent pack of people ever assembled.

Anonymous said...

This is clearly profiling. This program assumes that people who have more expendable cash are safer, something not supported in fact. Why is the TSA discriminating against those with less means?

Anonymous said...

"TSORon said....
They are not “elite” as you suggest, just people who want to go somewhere with a minimum of fuss and are willing to undergo a little inconvenience in advance to have less in the future."

Actually these individuals can very much be considered the "elite" as stated on your own website. I also find it interesting that if you are approved you will not know this until and if you are told to go through the expedited screening line, giving the TSA the continued ability to make up the rules as they go.

Congrats on a job well done. The IRS appreciates your efforts.

Anonymous said...

Excellent, now the rich can buy their way through security.

Kat said...

TSORon said, "At least the folks who use the Pre-Check program have had significant background checks done and TSA knows more about them than the average passenger. They are not “elite” as you suggest, just people who want to go somewhere with a minimum of fuss and are willing to undergo a little inconvenience in advance to have less in the future."

Ron, so, tell me, what's the difference between TSA's Pre, and having a US Passport? It takes weeks or months to get a passport, because the State Department jumps through all kinds of hoops to be sure you're who you say you are before issuing a passport. Why duplicate the effort, if a person already has a valid passport? Or if a person already has a NEXUS card which (based on comments here) no TSO seems to recognize? And what good is it if one is still at the whim of whichever TSO happens to be on duty that day?

Anonymous said...

Remove Shoes- adds nothing to security

remove 3-1-1 compliant bag from carry-on- adds nothing to security

Remove Laptop from bag- adds nothing to security

Remove Light outerwear/jacket- adds nothing to security.

remove Belt- adds nothing to security.

Boy I sure am glad your not security!!!!

Anonymous said...

"Assuming that your assumption is accurate about the 99.9%, that still leaves 1,800 passengers every day that fly who intend harm to our nation’s commercial aviation."

Come on, Ron. Given that the TSA misses approximately 70% of contraband and, presumably, other threats, that would mean that 1260 people intending harm. The 99.9% number is VERY low.

"TSA know that 99.9% of air travelers are not a threat to commercial aviation Sandra."

Does it, Ron? I can give you a bit of insight. US Senator's have had background checks. There are millions of DoD and IC cleared people who have had their background investigated significantly more than, say, any TSO.

"That’s the easy part. Determining which traveler is that 0.1% that actually IS a threat is the hard part. So far no one has come up with an even half decent way to determine who falls into that category that we don’t already know about."

Nonsense. Once again trotting out the "we do it as well as it can be done" justification of the wasteful, immoral and unconstitutional activities of the TSA.

" They don’t wear signs, or have blinking tattoo’s on their foreheads advising that they intend to harm an aircraft."

Sadly, it would take such signs for our TSA workforce to recognize the threat.



"{In fact, they most likely look just like you, or your neighbor, o the principal of your children’s school."


Could you support this contention? Have school principals - whose backgrounds have been investigate, btw - been implicated in threats to civil aviation?

"Could be the guy behind the counter at the corner gas station, or the night stocker at your local Walmart. "

Could be a TSO. How can we possibly trust the TSA when a TSO could be the threat?

"At least the folks who use the Pre-Check program have had significant background checks done and TSA knows more about them than the average passenger."

Ridiculous. If you consider the background checks performed under Pre-Check, I've got some oceanfront property in Arizona to sell you. This is just another indication that Ron, at least, knows NOTHING of background checks or security.

"They are not “elite” as you suggest, just people who want to go somewhere with a minimum of fuss and are willing to undergo a little inconvenience in advance to have less in the future."

Soon, passengers will be presumed to have the right to travel with minimal government interference. After the next election, the TSA will be reformed to be a professional, efficient and secure organization.

(screen shot captured)

Anonymous said...

"Yea... And TSA, moving at the speed of a glacier, finally figures out the obvious! Nice job guys!"

Just in time to have privatization forced upon it.

Have fun, guys, and dust off your resumes.

Vivien Blasquez said...

Now that the Senate has passed the FAA bill which overrides TSA's cap on airport security services replacement, do you expect any impact on this program as airports choose safer, less expensive, more professional, replacement of TSA's function?

Anonymous said...

So what about when you don't have adequate staffing? Will you be denying those trusted travelers entry to the sterile area or just this lady?

http://www.kdvr.com/news/kdvr-no-female-tsa-agents-means-no-flight-for-denver-woman-20120209,0,7106350.story?hpt=us_bn7

Anonymous said...

"Testing expedited screening for known airline crewmembers to verify their ide[n]tity"

Probably much more effective than doing the same for unknown airline crewmembers.

"Testing the expanded use of behavior detection techniques"

Since the original attempt used untrained people ("go out and keep an eye on people!"), that was shown in Nature to be ineffective, let's expand it! We have to have something to do with all the TSOs displaced by privatization.

"Nationwide changes to our physical security screening process for kids 12-and-under"

How can this be? We've been assured on this blog and elsewhere that the bad guys out there will use children and senior citizens!

Nothing makes an unresponsive bureaucracy move more quickly than the pending specter of its extinction.

(screen shot captured)

Anonymous said...

Have you considered expanding this to include all the Federal employees who have HSPD12 identification credentials? We've already had a full background investigation, finger prints, retina scan, etc. It's all on our secure id cards, along with our picture and agency affilliation. Many of us travel regularly, seems this would be a win-win for the government, letting its employees see some benefit of their recuring security screening translating into speed and convenience at the airport.

Anonymous said...

TSORon,

(First, as a side note, I think we would both agree that the actual number is much less than 0.1% though. To date, it has been roughly 20 people out of [how many?] millions of people who have flown.)

As you note, it "[c]ould be the guy behind the counter at the corner gas station...". Well then shouldn't we go and search him to make sure that he intends no harm to anyone. I mean why stop at the airport? If he really intends to do harm, shouldn't we go after him? If you say no we shouldn't - or it's different because it's not an airport. Why? Why is a person getting on a plane deserving of this "extra protection", but the person who drives is forced to face this neer-do-well when he fills up his car during his travels? Better yet, why is the person flying forced to face him at the gas station on his way to get on the plane?

TSA as an organization is not truly interested in security. As others have mentioned, it is jobs-theatre put on to make people who want some 'nanny-state' to tell them it's safe. It's interesting that the people who defend TSA as the be all / end all of security can even venture out of their house to make it to the airport. I guess they don't think about all those 'nasties' that they have to be around on that part of the trip.

As well, most of the searches currently conducted by TSA are not reasonable searches. They do not align with the Aukai decision to be as minimally invasive as possible. (My disagreements with SCOTUS' "administrative search" carve out aside.) Most are, in effect, drag-net 4th amendment violating searches for anything illegal whether it has to do with TSA's mission of keeping weapons, explosives, or incendiaries off the plane. It has been shown in the past that even perfectly legal items and activities were to be questioned by the TSA. Not to mention the magical trash cans TSA buys that immediately renders "voluntarily surrendered" items completely inert - whether it was 'voluntarily surrendered' or not.

I ask you to help me understand how someone can defend this tyranny that is invading our country because, based on your response above to Sandra, I can see no other final result.

How can you not see the fallacies in your response about the "0.1%" that may intend to harm others as justification to deprive the other "99.9%" of their personal rights and liberties? Not to mention the logical authoritarian result of such policies and how quickly it can (and will) be used to justify the continued loss of freedoms and rights of everyone. After all, TSA is already shown up at train stations, bus stations, and subway stations. They have passed out flyers to truckers at a weigh station - although I do wonder if the xray truck was there too. They are also attempting to expand to different venues "by request".

I am not advocating for no security - I'm advocating for reasonable security. And to answer the next question - put it back in the hands of the airlines, the market will quickly determine what is and is not reasonable.

Dick K. said...

Will the expanded PreCheck continue to be limited to Delta and American Airlines passengers, or will it be open to all qualified passenegers embarking at the participating airports?

Anonymous said...

If you only fly a couple times each year, honestly, how much of an inconvenience is it for you to take off your shoes, place all other items in a bin and walk through a metal detector and be on your way? It's a lot less than those that fly daily, weekly or monthly and are looking for a way to speed up the process and are willing to pay. No different than other aspects of society... (IE - You pay for pizza delivery so you don't have to leave your house - same thing convenience.)

Anonymous said...

Hmm..as a security screener, I would never clear a bag that has a laptop in it...but eh if that is what the bosses want!

Anonymous said...

"Hmm..as a security screener, I would never clear a bag that has a laptop in it...but eh if that is what the bosses want!"

That's the spirit. You feel it's important to uphold dated and useless procedures like removing laptops from bags but you're willing to ignore that because the paycheck is the point of you being there.

Amazing.

Anonymous said...

"To date, it has been roughly 20 people out of [how many?] millions of people who have flown.)"

I'm not sure about the 20 number that you cite but Congress reported last Fall that TSA had missed 17 threat individuals.

Missed 17 out of 20 - seems about right for the TSA.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Remove Shoes- adds nothing to security

remove 3-1-1 compliant bag from carry-on- adds nothing to security

Remove Laptop from bag- adds nothing to security

Remove Light outerwear/jacket- adds nothing to security.

remove Belt- adds nothing to security.

Boy I sure am glad your not security!!!!

February 10, 2012 1:17 PM

....................
But this Anon doesn't postulate how doing these things moves the security ball forward.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
If you only fly a couple times each year, honestly, how much of an inconvenience is it for you to take off your shoes, place all other items in a bin and walk through a metal detector and be on your way? It's a lot less than those that fly daily, weekly or monthly and are looking for a way to speed up the process and are willing to pay. No different than other aspects of society... (IE - You pay for pizza delivery so you don't have to leave your house - same thing convenience.)

February 10, 2012 8:21 PM
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
Being willing to pay for different screening completely discredits the security requirements that TSA claims is so necessary.

Apparently in TSA's Bizarro World having some extra cash negates full screening.

Either the security steps are valid and needed are just a bunch of show.

Which is it TSA?
...............................

All postings submitted to the TSA Blog, a government propaganda activity, are done so in full acknowledgement that "Free Speech is a Right" and cannot be infringe upon as detailed in the First Amendment of the United States Constitution and upheld by numerous Supreme Court decisions.
Any violation of this right by TSA, an agency of the United States, and its employees is a willful Civil Rights violation and actionable.

Anonymous said...

I would hate to see you people at the doctor’s office. Don't touch that! No you can't lift my pants leg up. Why do you have to do that or this....? Whine Whine Whine... sound like kids!! You should be discussing how to find fixes or easier ways to help do things. Complaining never gets you anywhere.

Mike Toreno said...

"Please provide some evidence that this background check is able to identify possible terrorists."

It isn't done by the TSA

Anonymous said...

Please explain how the Pre-Check program is not profiling.

Since I'm assuming that no one will list "terrorist" as a profession on their application, you are just making assumptions about risk based on where a person comes from and what they do for a living. That's profiling.

The TSA keeps telling us that profiling doesn't work and they don't use it. Make up your minds.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I would hate to see you people at the doctor’s office. Don't touch that! No you can't lift my pants leg up. Why do you have to do that or this....? Whine Whine Whine... sound like kids!! You should be discussing how to find fixes or easier ways to help do things. Complaining never gets you anywhere.

February 11, 2012 1:47 PM
..................
Doctors and other Health Care workers provide a valuable service.

TSA workers, not so much!

Anonymous said...

""I would hate to see you people at the doctor’s office. Don't touch that! No you can't lift my pants leg up."

As a medical professional, this offends me. If anyone suggests that they're unconfortable, any responsible medical professional will stop and examine alternative ways to examine the patient.

" Why do you have to do that or this....?"

And I will explain why I have to do "that."

" Whine Whine Whine... sound like kids!!"

Why are you insulting people with concerns? It makes me think you realize you're taking inappropriate actions.

"You should be discussing how to find fixes or easier ways to help do things."

Several ways of fixing the abuses of the TSA have been suggested and will be implemented by the reform of the TSA.

" Complaining never gets you anywhere."

Nonsense. Complaining frequently results in reform. In this case, it will result in the replacement of the TSA with a professional security force.

Anonymous said...

Very nice start. What about holders of TSA's very own TWIC cards? Might as well make use of them!

Anonymous said...

Roger McQuinn...This is from the press release regarding Precheck Pilot in Miami: Eligible participants include certain frequent flyers from American Airlines and Delta Air Lines as well as members of the Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP’s) Trusted Traveler programs, including Global Entry, SENTRI, and NEXUS, who are U.S. citizens and are flying on participating airlines.

Who needs educating?

rwilymz said...

Okay, so why are you refusing to post my comments STILL?

Anonymous said...

If you only fly a couple times each year, honestly, how much of an inconvenience is it for you to take off your shoes, place all other items in a bin and walk through a metal detector and be on your way?

Thanks for worrying, but it's really none of your business what I consider an inconvenience.

Walking thru the metal detector, OK, got that. Unpacking nearly everyhing I have in my carry-on, not OK.

Also, it makes no difference if you fly one time or 100 times, it's the same! The frequent flyer doesn't get to decide it's okay for me to be inconvenienced but not him or her.

Anonymous said...

"Also, it makes no difference if you fly one time or 100 times, it's the same! The frequent flyer doesn't get to decide it's okay for me to be inconvenienced but not him or her."

Sounds like jealousy to me. :D

Anonymous said...

One thing g to remember when you try and use this....
Use the smart phone scannable boarding pass. This works as the only true means for approval when at the TSA check point. Many airline boarding passes don't yet have the ability to be scanned so you aren't granted access. A TSA agent gave me this info months ago and since, it works every time.
I love the program and have enrolled my family as well.

Robert J.W. Hill said...

Lambert St. Louis airport has TSA PreCheck w/ US Airways & w/ American Airlines. I would be very interested to have TSA PreCheck begin service at Lambert St. Louis airport w/ Delta Airlines and Southwest Airlines. Anyone know how to request or vote for the inclusion of Delta or the addition of Southwest to the TSA PreCheck program?