Friday, February 24, 2012

TSA Week in Review: Artillery Projectile Fuse?

M557 projectile fuse, inert grenades, drugs concealed in peanut butter, knife concealed in laptop, knives, smoke grenades.
M557 Projectile Fuse: (See Pic) This is the nosecone fuse used with shells fired out of various guns, howitzers and mortars. Instead of having a detonator, it was filled with wax and used as a training device. Of course, we didn’t know that at first and it didn’t help that it caused our explosive trace detector to alarm. Great job to the team at Salt Lake City (SLC).

Knife Inside Laptop: Similar to when a surgeon stitches a scalpel inside a patient, a computer tech put a computer back together and left his knife inside. You can imagine the passenger’s surprise when our officers at Jacksonville (JAX) discovered it. After all, the passenger had just rented the computer, it wasn’t theirs!

Have I Ever Mentioned That Grenades are Prohibited?: Two inert grenades were discovered at Columbus (CSG) and a live M18 smoke grenade was discovered at Seattle (SEA). If that’s not enough, yet another live smoke grenade was discovered in checked baggage at Colorado Springs (COS). It’s obvious why smoke grenades aren’t allowed, but read here and here  for more information on why inert grenades cause problems at checkpoints.

Somebody Doesn’t Read the TSA Week in Review: Just like the incident I wrote about last week, another passenger attempted to conceal marijuana in a hollowed out peanut butter jar. Just like last week, we found it.

How to Complicate Things: A passenger at Houston (IAH) told an officer: “If I miss my flight, I will come back and strangle you.” The passenger missed their flight. Another passenger, while waiting in line to board his flight at Palm Beach (PBI), told fellow passengers: “Good luck getting on this plane because it’s going down.” It didn’t go down, but it was delayed for 52 minutes affecting 89 passengers.

If at First You Don’t Succeed…:  After a passenger attempted to check an unloaded 9mm in her checked baggage at Norfolk (ORF), she was informed by the airline that she needed a hard-sided lockable case in order to check it properly. (See details on properly checking firearms) Instead of heeding their advice or giving the firearm to her father as she said she would, the passenger attempted to conceal the firearm with other items in her purse. We found it.

Gellin’ Like a Felon?: During additional screening, officers at Denver (DEN) noticed a bulky area under the insole of a shoe and discovered narcotics.

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items: In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also found several stun guns, a throwing star, nunchucks, brass knuckles, realistic firearm replicas, knives, knives, and more knives, firearm components, ammunition, and an expandable baton.

9 loaded firearms.


Firearms: Here are the firearms our officers found in carry-on baggage since I posted last Friday.

35 guns discovered. 25 were loaded.
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm permits policies may differ from state to state. Travelers are encouraged to familiarize themselves with state and local weapons and firearm regulations for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the throughput is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items in their bag. That’s why it’s important to double check your luggage before you get to the airport.

Including checkpoint and checked baggage screening, TSA has
20 layers of security both visible and invisible to the public. Each one of these layers alone is capable of stopping a terrorist attack. In combination their security value is multiplied, creating a much stronger, formidable system. A terrorist who has to overcome multiple security layers in order to carry out an attack is more likely to be pre-empted, deterred, or to fail during the attempt.  

Blogger Bob Burns
 
TSA Blog Team

If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

Thursday, February 23, 2012

It’s Always one Thing or an Otter: Baby Otters Screened at Newark

Otters
Otters are used to frolicking around in the water and snacking on invertebrates and such, but when it comes to airline security, it’s safe to say that’s one area otters aren’t used to. Anyhoo, these furry little Asian River Otter pups and their significant “otters” were quickly screened and on their way in no time.

While many otters are content with being in jug bands,  these particular otters reside at the Wildlife World Zoo in Phoenix, Arizona and were on their way back from the David Letterman show. One of the feisty little dudes mistook Jack Hanna’s thumb for a chicken foot and took a bite out of it. If you haven’t seen it, you really “otter” check it out.

If you plan on traveling with your own romp of otters, or any other type of pet, service animal, or what have you, be sure to let us know you’re coming if you’re not familiar with the process or if you’d just like to give us a heads up. For example, we knew the otters were coming, and we were able to move the handlers ahead of the very busy line at the checkpoint and then relocate everybody to one of our offices to screen the otters in a much calmer environment. It was “otterly” seamless.

I imagine that living the life of an otter would be fantastic, but hey… aren’t things always greener on the “otter” side? If we ever see these pups again, you best believe we’ll be the first to say “Welcome Back Otter.”


If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

Friday, February 17, 2012

TSA Week in Review: Spear Gun!

Spear gun, Knives, Sword Cane, Drugs Concealed in Peanut Butter
Paging Captain Ahab: Another spear gun was discovered in a carry-on bag at Newark (EWR). The passenger assumed spear guns were good to go. Nope.

TSA Pre✓™  News: TSA Pre✓™ rolled out at Salt Lake City International Airport on the 14th!

Trick up Your Tie: A passenger at Orlando (MCO) had a pocket knife concealed behind their tie. (See photo) The passenger stated he keeps it there so his kids can’t find it.

Conceal Carry Permits: A passenger at San Antonio (SAT) had a loaded .32 with 8 rounds in their carry-on bag. In case they don’t cover this in the conceal carry course, the permit doesn’t allow you to carry a concealed firearm on a commercial aircraft. She thought it did. 

185 Rounds: We usually find a few rounds scattered in a bag, but this time, our officers at San Juan (SJU) found 185 rounds of .22 ammunition in a carry-on bag.

What Not to Say: A passenger referring to his bag at Islip airport (ISP) told our officer: “Yeah, I got a bomb in it.” Not a good way to expedite your screening…

You got Your Green Leafy Substance in my Peanut Butter: A passenger at Oakland (OAK) hollowed out the center of a peanut butter jar and attempted to conceal a baggie of marijuana. We found it.

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items: In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also found several stun guns, brass knuckles, realistic replica firearms, knives, knives, and more knives, firearm components, ammunition, and expandable batons and a throwing star.

9 loaded firearms.
Firearms: Our officers found 24 loaded firearms and 4 unloaded firearms in carry-on baggage since I posted last Friday. Here’s a rundown of the 28 firearms our officers kept off of airplanes this week: 
2/10: AMA – Loaded 9mm – DAL – Loaded .32 w/ round chambered – MDW – Loaded .380 – TPA – Loaded .32 – DFW – Unloaded .38 – LAS – Loaded .380 w/ round chambered – RNO – Loaded .38
2/11: FLL – Loaded .38 – FLL – Loaded .40 w/ round chambered – LGB – Loaded 9mm w/ round chambered – SHV – Loaded .38 – SAT – Loaded .32 – ONT – Loaded .40 – ATL – Loaded .40 w/ round chambered
2/12: SFO – Loaded 9mm w/ round chambered – DFW – Loaded .38
2/13: SLC – Unloaded .40 – IND – Loaded .380 w/ round chambered – DTW – Loaded 9mm
2/14: PDX – Loaded .22 w/ two rounds chambered
2/15: CLT – Loaded .40 – ORD - Loaded .380 w/ round chambered – DFW – Unloaded .357 – ATL – Loaded .45 – LAX – Loaded .38
2/16: FLL – Loaded .380 – ANC – Unloaded .22 – LAS – Loaded .45 w/ round chambered
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. We also look for explosives and bomb components, but thankfully those are extremely rare and we're happy to keep it that way.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the throughput is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items in their bag. That’s why it’s important to double check your luggage before you get to the airport.


Including checkpoint and checked baggage screening, TSA has
20 layers of security both visible and invisible to the public. Each one of these layers alone is capable of stopping a terrorist attack. In combination their security value is multiplied, creating a much stronger, formidable system. A terrorist who has to overcome multiple security layers in order to carry out an attack is more likely to be pre-empted, deterred, or to fail during the attempt.  

Blogger Bob Burns
 
TSA Blog Team
If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

TSA Officers Focus on Security, not Good Looks

The internet is abuzz with posts, tweets and news articles regarding allegations that TSA officers required a passenger to go through a body scanner multiple times because she was attractive.

First, I want to reassure all passengers that TSA does not profile passengers.   

Second, I’m pleased to inform all concerned parties that every single one of our millimeter wave units in the field, including those at Dallas/Ft. Worth (DFW airport), have been equipped for quite some time with privacy software that no longer displays a specific image of the person being screened.

The monitor is mounted on the scanner itself, and here’s what both the passenger and officer see:

AIT ATR Monitor
That’s it. In fact, if there are no alarms, a green screen with “OK” is all that’s displayed. There is no longer a need for an officer to review images in a remote location because there are no longer any privacy concerns with the image. 

Even when we did review the images in a remote room, they looked more like fuzzy photo negatives than the images that some make them out to be. Furthermore, it’s not TSA’s policy to scan passengers multiple times. 

We have no record of the passenger filing a complaint when this allegedly occurred more than six months ago. Had it been reported to TSA at that time, we could have reviewed CCTV and interviewed the officers. We were instead notified about these allegations by the media more than six months after the alleged incident. 

In situations such as these, passengers should use Talk to TSA to contact a customer support manager at the airport they traveled through. Passengers can also call our contact center. We want to hear from you, good or bad. We take your feedback seriously and will use the details you provide to look into your concerns. 

Our backscatter units (another type of body scanner) will eventually use the same software and still required the need of an officer in a remote private location to view the images. That officer never sees the passenger, just their image. In case you’re wondering, DFW only has millimeter wave units.

When it all comes down to it, our officers are focusing on keeping passengers safe, not their good looks.

If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

Friday, February 10, 2012

TSA Week in Review: Fantasy Knives and More Cannonballs

Cannonballs, grenade launcher, knives, throwing star, inert grenades.
More Cannonballs: Two cannonballs and an antique firearm were discovered at Kahului (OGG). Now this song is stuck in my head.

Fantasy Knives: Two knives (see photo) were discovered at John F Kennedy (JFK). These knives come in handy when slaying various mythological creatures, but these creatures don’t exist on planes or elsewhere for that matter. 

No Good Knives In Cancun?: A 7” kitchen knife was discovered in a bag at Denver (DEN). The passenger stated they brought the knife because there are “no good knives in Cancun.”

Kukri Knife: Also known as the “Gurkha Blade,” this Nepalese knife is used as both a tool and a weapon. While it has been approved for the battlefield, it’s not permitted to travel in your carry-on baggage. This particular knife was found at Washington – Reagan (DCA).

Grenades: Two inert grenades were found this week at Colorado Springs (COS) and my old workplace, Cincinnati (CVG). Read here and here  for more information on why inert grenades cause problems at checkpoints.

Grenade Launcher: Yes, you read correctly, a grenade launcher was discovered during a search in checked baggage at Seattle Tacoma (SEA). It’s not as ominous as it sounds though. There were no grenades with the item. It’s not every day you come across a grenade launcher, so I just had to mention it. 

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items: In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also found stun guns, brass knuckles, realistic replica firearms, knives, knives, and more knives, firearm components, ammunition, and expandable batons and blackjacks.

8 loaded guns.
Firearms: Our officers found 14 loaded firearms and 9 unloaded firearms in carry-on baggage since I posted last Friday. Here’s a rundown of the 23 firearms our officers kept off of airplanes this week: 

2/3: LFT – Loaded .45 w/ round chambered – ABQ – Loaded .380 w/ round chambered – SLC – Loaded .380
2/4: MCO – Loaded .380 – FLO – Loaded .38 – GNV – Unloaded .38
2/5: ATL – Unloaded .380 – ABQ – Loaded .40 w/ round chambered
2/6: HSV – Loaded .380 w/ round chambered – PIT – Unloaded .22 – PHX – Unloaded .380 – MCI – Loaded .380
2/7: DEN – Loaded .22 – LAS – Loaded .40 – AUS – Loaded .380 – ATL – Loaded .380 w/ round chambered
2/8: OGG – Antique firearm – DAL – Unloaded .38 – IAH – Unloaded .38
2/9: IND – Loaded firearm w/ round chambered – TPA – Unloaded .22 – DFW – Unloaded 9mm – RDU – Loaded .38
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. We also look for explosives and bomb components, but thankfully those are extremely rare and we're happy to keep it that way.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the throughput is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items in their bag. That’s why it’s important to double check your luggage before you get to the airport.

Including checkpoint and checked baggage screening, TSA has 20 layers of security both visible and invisible to the public. Each one of these layers alone is capable of stopping a terrorist attack. In combination their security value is multiplied, creating a much stronger, formidable system. A terrorist who has to overcome multiple security layers in order to carry out an attack is more likely to be pre-empted, deterred, or to fail during the attempt.  

Blogger Bob Burns  
TSA Blog Team
If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.
Labels: 

The Importance of Getting to the Gate Early


You may have read in the news today about a woman who missed her flight because there weren’t any female officers to screen her. As in most cases, there is more to this story. Read on…

In TSA’s smaller airports, we work closely with the airlines and airport to keep the security checkpoints open to make certain that all passengers are screened appropriately. Once TSA is informed by the airline that our screening services are no longer needed, the security checkpoint is closed.   

Recently, a passenger attempted to access the checkpoint after it had closed. The airline had already made final boarding announcements and notified TSA that no additional passengers would be accepted. A TSA officer made two additional public announcements asking for any remaining passengers to report to the security checkpoint for screening. After both the flight and checkpoint were closed, a female passenger requested screening. Even though the checkpoint was already closed, our officer told the passenger he would attempt to recall a female officer to screen her, but was informed by the airline that she would not be able to board.

Yes, it is standard procedure for us to provide same-gender pat-downs when needed; however, in this instance, the airline had made final boarding announcements and notified TSA that no additional passengers would be accepted. This is why it is so important to arrive early, at least an hour before your departure when possible at smaller airports and two at larger ones to ensure you make your flight.
When possible, TSA makes every effort to accommodate a passenger’s request. 

 
If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

TSA Pre✓™ Pilot to Expand to 28 of the Busiest US Airports

TSA Pre✓™ logo.
Earlier today, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano and Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Administrator John S. Pistole announced the expansion of TSA Pre™ to 28 additional airports across the country following the success at seven pilot locations. Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Atlanta, Detroit, Miami, and New York JFK.

As part of the initiative’s expansion, TSA Pre™ will be rolling out at the following 28 airport locations this year:
- Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI)
- Boston Logan International Airport (BOS)
- Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT)
- Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG)
- Denver International Airport (DEN)
- Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL)
- George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH)
- Honolulu International Airport (HNL)
- Indianapolis International Airport (IND)
- LaGuardia Airport (LGA)
- Lambert-St. Louis International Airport (STL)
- Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (MSY)
- Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport (SJU)
- Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR)
- O’Hare International Airport (ORD)
- Orlando International Airport (MCO)
- Philadelphia International Airport (PHL)
- Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX)
- Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT)
- Portland International Airport (PDX)
- Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA)
- Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC)
- San Francisco International Airport (SFO)
- Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA)
- Tampa International Airport (TPA)
- Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC)
- Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD)
Considering all the great feedback we’ve received, I imagine this will be very welcome news to many of the frequent flyers out there, including the 336,000 passengers who have already been screened through a TSA Prelane. TSA will continue expanding TSA Pre™ to additional airlines and airports once they’re ready to go.

If you want to learn how to sign up for TSA Pre✓™, click here. Eligible participants include certain frequent flyers from participating airlines as well as members of Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Trusted Traveler programs (Global Entry, SENTRI, and NEXUS) who are U.S. citizens and fly on a participating airline. Individuals interested in participating in the pilot can apply via Global Entry at http://www.globalentry.gov/.

For those who might not be familiar with TSA Pre✓™, there’s lots of info on our blog and on TSA.gov. This screening concept enhances security by enabling TSA to focus its efforts on passengers the agency knows less about while providing expedited screening for travelers who volunteer information about themselves prior to flying.

If TSA determines a passenger is eligible for expedited screening following the TSA Pre™ vetting process, information will be embedded in the barcode of the passenger’s boarding pass. TSA will read the barcode at the security checkpoint and then may refer the passenger to a TSA Pre™ lane, where they will undergo expedited screening, which could include no longer removing the following items:
Shoes
3-1-1 compliant bag from carry-on
Laptop from bag
Light outerwear/jacket
Belt
TSA will always incorporate random and unpredictable security measures throughout the airport and no individual will be guaranteed expedited screening.

TSA Pre✓™ will join other elements of risk-based security currently under way including:
All of these initiatives are designed to improve our security approach while enhancing the passenger’s security experience. We thank U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the airlines, and passengers for their partnership as we work to provide the most effective transportation security in the most efficient way.  

If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

Friday, February 3, 2012

TSA Week in Review: Coral Covered Explosively Viable Cannonball

Cannonball, cattle prod, lipstick knife, inert grenades and firearm components.
Cannonball: A cannonball was discovered in checked baggage at Ft Lauderdale (FLL). Nothing malicious here, just a diver who found the old projectile near a 1750-1800 era shipwreck. It was determined that the coral covered cannonball was explosively viable which triggered an evacuation of the checked baggage area and a visit from a TSA explosives specialist and a Broward County bomb tech. Cannonballs found on the ocean floor can retain their explosives and have been known to detonate on their own. The bomb tech took possession of the item for further identification, diagnostics, and safe disposal. Three flights were delayed affecting 290 passengers. Cannonballs are created to damage and destroy things, but I doubt its creators had any clue that it would destroy people’s schedules hundreds of years later.

 “Beefed” up Stun Gun: Holy cow!!! A cattle prod was discovered during the search of a carry-on bag at Baltimore (BWI) Moooving right along…

Cutting Edge Cosmetics: A lipstick knife was found in a passenger’s carry-on bag at Denver (DEN).

Grenades Again?: This time they were inert practice grenades packed along with seven M16 magazines and other gear at San Diego (SAN). I know, you’re probably wondering what harm an inert grenade could do. Actually, no harm at all to your well being, but it can put a kink in your scheduled due to closed checkpoints and baggage areas. Read here and here  for more information on grenades.

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items: In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also found stun guns, brass knuckles, knives, knives, and more knives, firearm components, ammunition, and expandable batons.
9 loaded guns.
Firearms: Our officers found 14 loaded firearms and 5 unloaded firearms in carry-on baggage since I posted last Friday. Here’s a rundown of the 19 firearms our officers kept off of airplanes this week: 

1/27: TUL – Loaded .38 – TUL – Loaded .380
1/28: BWI – Unloaded firearm
1/29: DFW – Loaded .380 – ATL – Unloaded .22
1/30: LAS – Loaded 9mm w/ round chambered – COS – Unloaded .22 – AUS – Loaded .25 – DTW – Loaded .380 w/ round chambered – TOL – Loaded .380 – IAH – Loaded .32
1/31: MSP – Loaded 9mm
2/1: JAX – Loaded 9mm – PHX – Loaded .40 w/ round chambered
2/2: AUS – Unloaded .22 – IND – Loaded .380 – BNA – Loaded .357 – MCO – Loaded .25 – IAH – Unloaded .40

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.
You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. We also look for explosives and bomb components, but thankfully those are extremely rare and we're happy to keep it that way.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the throughput is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items in their bag. That’s why it’s important to double check your luggage before you get to the airport.


Including checkpoint and checked baggage screening, TSA has
20 layers of security both visible and invisible to the public. Each one of these layers alone is capable of stopping a terrorist attack. In combination their security value is multiplied, creating a much stronger, formidable system. A terrorist who has to overcome multiple security layers in order to carry out an attack is more likely to be pre-empted, deterred, or to fail during the attempt.  

Blogger Bob Burns
 
TSA Blog Team
If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.



Thursday, February 2, 2012

Travel Tips for Fans Traveling to Super Bowl XLVI

Super Bowl XLVI banner.
40,000 or more additional passengers are expected at Indianapolis International Airport (IND) during game week, more than 70 additional commercial flights and 30 charter flights. Arrivals will increase the entire week before game day. We thought it might be helpful to put together a little list with some helpful hints related to things football fans might want to know.

Super Bowl Information: For extended airport operating hours, Super Bowl travel accommodations, special airport amenities, etc., please visit the Host Committee’s website.

Body Scanners: Contrary to what you may have heard, TSA is not using body scanners (Advanced Imaging Technology) at the stadium for the Super Bowl. To keep passengers flying out of Indianapolis International Airport (IND) safe, we do have our new millimeter wave machines that show a generic image for each passenger at the IND airport

TSA's Traveler Site: Go to the TSA Traveler’s Site for more information on permitted and prohibited items, travel tips, etc.

MyTSA App: Use TSA’s MyTSA app for crowd-sourced wait times, and other useful information and tools.

Heightened Security: You can expect to see TSA assets working with law enforcement to help with the heightened security at the stadium. Read here for more information…

Items you may WANT to bring; but CAN’T…
Air horns: Air horns are prohibited in both carry-on and checked baggage. It’s a compressed can of air which is prohibited, but can you imagine the reaction from passengers if one of those things went off in the cabin?

Concealment flasks: We’ve seen them all. Binocular flasks, beer bellies, cell phone flasks, cane flasks, pen flasks, flip flop flasks, you name it… You may be able to sneak these into concerts and sporting events, but we’ll find them at the airport. Please get your libations in Indianapolis if you’re not going to check them in your baggage. You can however have 3.4 oz or less bottles of liquid in a baggie per 3-1-1 guidelines.

Propane tanks: These are a big no-no. I’m a camper, and I know how handy they are for stoves, heaters, coffee makers, etc., but they’re a compressed flammable gas that can’t be brought on the plane at all.

Gas heaters and stoves: These are popular items at tailgating events, but if gasoline can be smelled, the item won’t be permitted.
Loose fitting jerseys: These are great, but if they’re being worn as outerwear, you may be asked to remove them.

Food Items: Here is a list of items that should be placed in your checked bags instead of your carry-on bags to comply with our 3-1-1 policy: Creamy dips and spreads, cheeses, peanut butter, salsa, jams, salad dressings, jellies, maple syrup, sauces, soups, wine, liquor and beer.

NE Patriots fans: You should be prepared to remove your tricorn hats during the screening process. (We make the Cheeseheads do it too.) Also, if you want to bring your life-sized Tom Brady cutout, you may have to check with the airline about buying another seat.

NY Giants fans: You should be prepared to duck when going through the walkthrough metal detector and body scanners. Get it? Duck? Giants? Oh well…

Heading home: Obviously, the busiest travel day will be the day after the game, so be sure to allow extra time to get to the airport. To help keep things speedy, TSA will have every lane at every checkpoint at IND fully staffed and operational. There will also be two extra screening lanes at each concourse entrance to speed security processing.

For all of you who are traveling to Indianapolis for the big game, safe travels and have a great time! I’ll be at home with the family (and my Tom Brady cutout) kicked back in a recliner with some Cincinnati chili dip

If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.