Sunday, December 11, 2011

Clarification on Screening of Three Senior Citizens at JFK

Since we blogged last weekend about a passenger's screening experience at JFK International Airport, some additional concerns have been raised. We want to clarify a few things but first and foremost, we wanted to ensure our readers understand this:
TSA does not, and has never, conducted strip searches and no strip searches occurred in any of these incidents. 
We truly regret these passengers feel they had a bad screening experience. Our goal is to provide the highest level of security while ensuring that all passengers are treated with dignity and respect. We work regularly with a coalition of advocacy groups that represent those with disabilities and medical conditions to help TSA understand their conditions and adapt screening procedures accordingly.

Last week, TSA senior leadership convened a call with these groups to share information about our policies and procedures. TSA informed them that we're in the process of establishing an 800 number dedicated to travelers with disabilities, medical conditions, or those who may require assistance during screening. Passengers will be able to call this number prior to flying to get guidance and information about screening, based on their needs. Additionally, TSA regularly trains its workforce on how to screen travelers with disabilities or medical conditions and has customer service managers on hand at airports to answer questions and assist passengers.

We’ve had some questions since we posted on Ms. Zimmerman’s complaint last weekend. People wanted to know why we had her remove her back brace when our web page clearly states that our officers will not ask for braces to be removed. To be honest, I was asking myself the same question. Here’s what happened: There was a bit of a miscommunication and our officers were told that the passenger was wearing a money belt. Unlike medical braces and supports, money belts must be removed since they’re not providing any type of medical benefit. After the passenger removed the item, it was then determined to be a Velcro fastened support brace and not a money belt. Since the item had already been removed, our officers had it X-rayed and returned it to the passenger who was then clear to travel.

JKF officers are receiving refresher training to include scenario-based exercises on how to respectfully and safely screen passengers with disabilities or medical conditions to ensure all the proper procedures are followed. Our goal every day is provide the highest level of security, in the most respectful and efficient way possible.

We recommend that all passengers familiarize themselves with security protocols and inform officers prior to screening if they have medical devices that require special screening. It makes things easier for everybody if all parties know in advance what to expect.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind. You can find many more tips for traveling with disabilities here at our web page
TSA officers do not ask passengers to remove clothing to expose a sensitive area or to remove a medical device or brace. We have special procedures that allow us to safely screen passengers with disabilities.
Notification cards, are a great way for passengers to discreetly let us know about a medical condition or disability. Passengers may present these cards at the checkpoint to our officers.
Passengers should always be in view of their belongings. If you can’t see your belongings during secondary screening, please request that an officer bring them to you.
Passengers who know they may need additional screening ahead of time may contact a TSA customer support manager at their departure airport ahead of travel to ensure their needs are met. If private screening is needed, passengers are free to have a family member or travel companion join them in the private screening room.
Here are some resources for more information and ways to contact TSA in both the field and at Headquarters.  
Traveling With Disabilities – A wealth of information for passenger with disabilities traveling through TSA checkpoints.
Talk To TSA- Contact a TSA Customer Support Manager at the airport you are traveling through.
TSA Contact CenterA place to find contact information for specific offices or to just ask a general question.
If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

128 comments:

Anonymous said...

Oh please, the lies are getting so old.....

Don't you expect us to remember that your staff has even made women remove nipple piercings with pliers? And there have also been numerous reports of women having to remove tight skirts.

Every day = another TSA lie.

Anonymous said...

Let's be clear here. Is the TSA's definition of a "Strip Search" limited to having a person take off all of their clothes and then bend over and spread their buttocks and genitalia? Is that the definition that you are using? Because in that case, simply forcing people to remove their clothes really wouldn't be an actual Strip Search? Please clear this issue up for the public with clear and specific language, OK?

Anonymous said...

What a joke. Everytime I request my belongings be brought to me, I'm treated like a Terrorist asking for my bomb. I've had numerous items stolen and no one at the TSA gives a crap.

Anonymous said...

I don´t believe that story for a second. There is no way a person would have told the screeners they are wearing a money belt, when in fact it was a medical back brace. Either you confused and missdirected her, or you are just downright lieing.

Anonymous said...

You say clothes will not be removed or lifted, yet every time I get rubbed down (because as an MD I will not allow you to irradiate me with no medical benefit), you lift my shirt, expose my bare waist and STICK YOUR HANDS INSIDE MY PANTS!

Considering I wear lycra elastic pants, this is completely ridiculous. I have come to the conclusion you do it purely to punish people who dare not comply with virtual strip searches.

Sommer Gentry said...

Can a passenger who does not want a private screening insist that his/her screening be conducted in full view of the public and of the cameras? The reason that TSA is able to deny that a strip search occurred is that the incident wasn't filmed or witnessed by a neutral party. Is there a situation where if I absolutely refuse to go with TSA into a private area, the TSA will refuse to screen me?

Laura said...

I appreciate getting the other side of the story, and it is enlightening to get a better explanation of TSA policies.

However, it is not uncommon for TSA screeners to be unaware--or to ignore--polcies. TSA screeners have an unacceptably high rate of turnove, which translates into less training and on-the-job observation than is optimal.

TSA is also frequently years behind necessary actions--why wasn't an 800 number established in 2002?

I do appreciate TSA's efforts to educate the public and hope it continues, but I am more concerned that it educate its own employees.

Anonymous said...

"Blogger Bob wrote....
TSA officers do not ask passengers to remove clothing to expose a sensitive area or to remove a medical device or brace. We have special procedures that allow us to safely screen passengers with disabilities."

Yet, these types of situations continue to happen along with the incidental emptying of medical devices.

"Notification cards, are a great way for passengers to discreetly let us know about a medical condition or disability. Passengers may present these cards at the checkpoint to our officers."

And then they are promptly ignored.

"Passengers should always be in view of their belongings. If you can’t see your belongings during secondary screening, please request that an officer bring them to you."

Good luck with this as in my experience it is out and out lie.

"Passengers who know they may need additional screening ahead of time may contact a TSA customer support manager at their departure airport ahead of travel to ensure their needs are met. If private screening is needed, passengers are free to have a family member or travel companion join them in the private screening room."

Maybe, but in most cases unlikely. At the very least you will be delayed on purpose for as long as possible to make sure you never make this request again. The same thing happens when refusing to use the scanners, you WILL be punitively delayed for as long possible.

And yes this is supposedly not policy but none the less true. Try it as I have.

RB said...

" We truly regret these passengers feel they had a bad screening experience."

In other words TSA procedures may be abusive but that's to darn bad.


"There was a bit of a miscommunication and our officers were told that the passenger was wearing a money belt. Unlike medical braces and supports, money belts must be removed since they’re not providing any type of medical benefit."

TSA, please explain how a money belt worn under clothing can be removed without opening or removing other clothing items. Do the words "Strip Search" come to mind?

If it was a money belt how was TSA going to take the item out of the private screening area and have it xrayed while making sure the passenger was in view of the of the item during the process?

This 800 number to call is of no use since the TSA offense has already occurred. The problem is clearly poorly trained TSA screeners and screenings that go well beyond any need to determine if a person has an item that is dangerous.

WTMD and ETD is all that is required. No Electronic or Real Strip Searches. No Pat Downs that contact a persons buttocks or genitals which is currently the procedure.

And please explain exactly what TSA means when they say they will go up until resistance is met. Do TSA employees have something other than genitals between their legs?

What is needed is a Passenger Advocate employed by the Airlines/Airports who have direct communications with the FSD and TSA OIG on duty at each and every TSA Checkpoint who can intervene immediately when TSA steps out of line. This person cannot be a TSA or other government employee and still represent the public.

As far as this latest Blog article, stop with the CYA.

It is clear that the lady at JFK was Strip Searched as were the other two ladies who spoke up after the fact.

The question about Paper Drapes asked previously is still waiting answer. Why does TSA need paper drapes if clothing is not being removed?

I have more questions but since I know that TSA will refuse to answer real questions and just continue the SPIN I will stop for now.

Anonymous said...

Exactly zero evidence has been provided refuting the claim that Mrs. Zimmerman was not strip searched.

Dr Ahmed Hosney PHD said...

SAFETY FIRST UNDER ANY CONDITIONS.

Anonymous said...

"..our officers were told that the passenger was wearing a money belt."

Who told your officers this?

Anonymous said...

Again with the "We truly regret these passengers feel they had a bad screening experience." Instead of "We truly regret these passengers had a bad screening experience."

1amWendy said...

Blogger Bob. your statement is totally untrue. I was strip-searched at DTW. Although the manager did apologize and state that it should have never happened, it did. It also happened to US Representative John Dingell. This just tells me that your organization does not train its people well and when "errors" occur your agency does nothing but cover it up.

Anonymous said...

Having had a hip replacement earlier this year myself, I've encountered no issues with the processes I've gone through. The new scanning machines are great, but in their absence, the only complaint I'd possibly have is the length of the verbal advisories prior to the pat-down - get on with it, already! I would like to emphasize/query a few things from Blogger Bob, however. First, if the JFK incident was a miscommunication, why was the brace x-rayed after they realized the miscommunication? The incorrect process being followed should have been TERMINATED, the item returned to the passenger with an explanation AND an apology. And NOT an apology for how she feels, but what TSA had done! As for the notification cards - they're great to make sure TSA knows what they're dealing with, but you've GOT to set the passenger's expectations! Informing the screener is all those are for - notification cards are NOT a "screening waiver" or "get out of screening jail free" card - the holder STILL must be screened. And finally, if you request your items be brought to you, or for a family member or traveling companion be present during your private screening, if your things or your companion have completed being screened - you have NOT, and you cannot have any contact or proximity until your screening process is complete. With some additional emphasis on fine points such as these, this blog will go a long ways to soothing some hurt feelings and setting the proper passenger expectations. Thanks for letting me have my say!

Sandra said...

Sorry, Bob, your explanation just does not hold water and certainly does NOT clarify the matter.

You say this was all the result of a "miscommunication." Seems to me that this thread is more of the same but this time intentional.

While the TSA may not strip search people, i.e., demand removal of all clothing, we do know and you cannot deny it no matter how hard you try, that TSA screeners often do require travelers to drop trou and underwear or remove blouses.

A congressman was forced to drop his trousers in 2002, a 16-year old girl with a prosthetic leg and an older woman also with a prosthetic leg were forced to do the same.

It happens, Bob, and it happens every single day in airports.

Why can you not acknowledge this and deal with it?

Screen shot and btw my post of 12.8.2011 at 7:33 a.m. never showed up in your first thread on this subject.

Anonymous said...

So you post that


Passengers should always be in view of their belongings. If you can’t see your belongings during secondary screening, please request that an officer bring them to you.


but what are you supposed to do when the TSA agent is the one taking them away?


Since the item had already been removed, our officers had it X-rayed and returned it to the passenger who was then clear to travel.


and you specifically state that people would be required to hand over money belts for additional scrutiny. Wouldn't the agent have to take it out of the private screening area and therefore out of sight?

Anonymous said...

"To be honest, I was asking myself the same question."

No you weren't. If you had been asking yourself this question you wouldn't have described this incident in your previous post as if procedures had been followed. Please stop lying.

Anonymous said...

It's one thing to have policies in place and it's quite another for everyone working at TSA checkpoints to know and follow those policies.

I fly several times a week (90 flights this year at last count and at least 5 more to go) so I encounter the full spectrum of security checkpoints.

Most TSA employees know the policies and carry them out well; every so often this isn't the case. (And I'm not talking about the "randomly do things differently to keep everyone on their toes". I'm talking about actual confusion about policy.)

(Earlier this year, I was told my bag had to be rescreened because it had my iPad in it and iPads always have to be removed and screened separately. When I mentioned that the TSA blog had done a post specifically saying this wasn't the case, the employee said "what's a blog?" (in a tone of voice that implied *I* was the idiot.)

A few weeks ago, I was at a security checkpoint and the screener didn't seem to know proper policy at all, which resulted in me being pulled aside so my stuff and I could be manually inspected. The being pulled aside is just par for the course when you fly as much as I do, but it was a bit irritating that the screener seemed to have no idea what the policies were.

I told the person charged with inspecting me (who was very nice and seemed to have a much better handle on knowing policy) that I would like to let the supervisor know that I didn't think the initial screener was well-trained on policy. He called the supervisor over, who was incredulous. He said to me, "are you trying to tell me that one of my employees may not know TSA policy." I politely said, yes, that it's possible that not everyone knows everything and in this case, there seemed to be some confusion on the part of the employee. The supervisor stormed off, apparently amazed and offended that I was suggesting that not everyone there was perfect all of the time.

The person screening me, on the other hand, thanked me for speaking up and said that he thought it was important.

Anonymous said...

No form of screening should require the removal of a money belt. By removing her belt, you put this woman at risk of theaft at the checkpoint or later, by someone who saw it, and also invaded her privacy.

Anonymous said...

"no strip searches occurred in any of these incidents."

Bob, you are a blogger. You are not the investigator of this case, or a witness standing in that private room when it happened.

You could say that as a blogger, you are a spokesperson for the TSA. But instead of writing these articles as a spokesperson, you write it as if you are the Judge. You are not the judge either, and this is where you are pissing people off. How about writing, " (insert name or position of person) has conducted an investigation into this matter and concluded that no strip searches occurred in these incidents."? But you keep taking the position that whenever a TSA badge wearing person tells you something, his/her words are supreme, golden, and as good as your own words. In the mean time, we the passengers read your biased posts with the feeling of being oppressed those TSA employees who were hired to be public servants.

For everyone else (passengers), ANY TIME an incident happens at a checkpoint where you suspect a criminal act is taking place, report it directly to the Airport Police FIRST and have him file a police report on the matter. Then after that, and only after that, should you go ahead and file a complaint with the TSA. Criminal acts include anything from items being stolen from your luggage to being strip searched if you believe you were searched in such a manner. Never file complaints like this soley with the TSA, or you will recieve the same kind of biased investigative results published on a public website as I explained in the paragraph above. If you file criminal complaints with a real law enforcement agency, the investigation will be conducted by an outside agency that actually handles criminal matters. But if you file it with TSA alone, they will investigate (and protect) themselves, then wash thier hands of you.

rwilymz said...

You can't be serious.

Money belt? Miscommunication?

How does "back brace" sound like "money belt"?

http://dblyelloline.blogspot.com/2011/12/sexual-predation-made-easy-2011-ross.html

Anonymous said...

Hang in there TSA. There are plenty of us out there who appreciate what you do, understand that for now, this is a part of travel and are intelligent enough to get to the airport at an appropriate time and comply without surliness. Standing in the screening line is hardly the venue for debate over it's necessity.

I can't walk without a cane, so I alert an agent for help (although often they notice and approach me first) before I cause a back-up that will trigger the "boarding stampede" phenomena.

Those screaming the loudest and most irrationally would be the first to file suit if an incident happened to harm them or someone they cared about.

Anonymous said...

Why does a money belt have to be removed? Does a shirt with an inside pocket have to be removed? What is the difference?

SSSS for some reason said...

Saying I'm sorry you feel that way is not an apology, it is an insult. You are reversing the blame around to the victim, it is the victims fault.

You don't consider what was done wrong, but why should you care? We as citizens don't have a choice. We can't go to the next airline, or even the next airport, and not deal with the TSA. That puts you, the TSA, in a position of not having to provide any level of customer service, let alone good service. You are policing your people by using your own rules. And we aren't allowed to know what the rules are because they're secret.

And you wonder why so many of us speak out against the TSA?

Jim Huggins said...

Bob ... gosh, picking holes in this statement is so easy ...

We truly regret these passengers feel they had a bad screening experience. Why do you regret their feelings? Why can't you simply admit that they had a bad screening experience, regardless of who was at fault?

There was a bit of a miscommunication. Who miscommunicated? The passenger, or TSA employees?

Our officers were told that the passenger was wearing a money belt. Who told your officers that? The passenger, or TSA employees?

Anonymous said...

Look, it's this simple: we don't trust you. NOBODY trusts you. You have too much authority and too little oversight and it seems as if you just make rules to be making them and nobody can question you without their motives coming under suspicion. You denied strip-searching the elderly lady in New York and then basically called an 82-year-old women a liar. In effect, you dumped all over everybody's grandmother. The fact is that the PR person denying the strip search has no real evidence that it didn't happen. It very well might have, unless you're selling the notion that every one of your agents is above the frailty and weakness of character that humans are prone to...the proper response to which is, "Right, yank the other one." Face it: You are as much our burden and our complaint as these shadowy figures you purport to oppose. Here's how I know this: The one STATED goal of Osama bin Laden was - quoting - "to make America live with the same fear and uncertainty that we live with every day." That fear and uncertainty is expressed every time a TSA agent lays a hand on a US citizen. And the other simple fact is this: WE, the American traveling public, is and will be FAR more effective at protecting ourselves from terrorists that you ever hope to be. Our own vigilance - not your $2 Million scanners and electronic gadgetry - is what can stop a terrorist ON THE SPOT and IN THE ACT, NOT the TSA. Your function is, at best, closing the barn door after the horse is gone. If anyone if congress had the stones, TSA would be disbanded tomorrow.

Now, trace my computer's internet address and ban me from flying for being honest. Shooting the messenger is one of the few things TSA is capable of.

Anonymous said...

More lies. How do you sleep at night, Curtis?

Screenshot saved.

rg said...

So tell us why your posted policy was NOT followed? Why was your "special procedure" NOT used?

Policy:

TSA officers do not ask passengers to remove clothing to expose a sensitive area or to remove a medical device or brace. We have special procedures that allow us to safely screen passengers with disabilities.

Anonymous said...

"Since the item had already been removed, our officers had it X-rayed and returned it to the passenger who was then clear to travel."

Why wasn't the support brace returned to the passenger immediately after determining that it was a support brace and not a money belt? There was no reason to X-ray it in the first place, and, more importantly, no reason to prolong the discomfort of the passenger keeping the brace off longer than necessary. Also, X-raying the brace unnecessarily prolonged the time of the screening process (maybe she wouldn't have missed her flight).

Anonymous said...

So, you are saying that the TSA never ask people to take off clothes but that this lady was made to remove her back brace? Are you claiming it was on the outside of her clothes and if it was how could you possibly not tell that it was not a money belt. The things do not even look remotely alike.

Anonymous said...

What a bunch of BS. This is another attempt to cover up a seniors 4 th admendemt rights being trampled upon. The ONLY reason this story was concocted is because YOU morons violated your own policy on medical devices and were caugh in a LIE.
Shame on you. TSA has prevented ZERO terrorist incident since its I'll conceived inception.

Anonymous said...

We don't believe you TSA. Not one word.

RB said...

American Doesn't Believe TSA Excuse


Read the comments TSA. Almost no one is buying the TSA story.

Roger said...

In other words, you acknowledge that TSA personnel exceeded official guidelines and required removal of a medical brace, which you acknowledge is not permitted.

Anonymous said...

Yes or no, Curtis: Were they strip-searched?

And why didn't you tell the truth the first time?

Anonymous said...

So long as the TSA exists, I will avoid flying commercial in the USA.

Kristen said...

The United States does not need TSA.

Anonymous said...

Let's pretend it was a money belt. So what? Why would that have to be removed? Can't hide a gun in a money belt. (And, even if you could, that's what the metal detector is for.)

Anonymous said...

Bob about six months or so ago i posted a comment that the TSA should have an "Ambassador program". Basically a independent TSA officer on duty at all times whom had the ability to contact the main office to get clarification on any issue. I also said that the TSA should have a direct 800 number and telephone available to any passenger while they are in the screening process instead of being locked in a glass box. These simple steps would solve many problems.

I am sure somebody in HQ is patting themselves on the back for the great new "idea". In any case, don't mess this one up. You have a chance here to do some good.

Anonymous said...

TSA under the guise of security continues to undermine the constitutional rights of americans.

Anonymous said...

Bob, it's just not believable that anyone could seriously mistake a back brace for a money belt. Either they're as blind as a bat, or they're lying. Guess which one is more likely?

Anonymous said...

Right now it is three elderly passengers word against your word. You are losing credibility.

Questions for you:

Who told the agents she was wearing a money belt? And why is that of a concern to TSA? It would not have been caught by the metal detector and the last I checked, money cannot blow up planes. I believe that TSA agents have been shown to steal from passengers more often than money has been shown to blow up planes. Correct me if I wrong on that.

You say in helps if all parties know in advance what to expect. Does this include the TSA? They feel up breast cancer patients, pull down underwear of the elderly, feel like prescription pills are a hazard to airline travel, empty ostomy bags onto travelers. Why aren't' the employees of TSA being trained to tell the difference between a money belt and a medical belt - they are not similar at all.

If a person's medical belt was removed and taken from them then that person did NOT have a good screening. The TSA needs to own up to that and stop saying they are sorry that the traveller does not "feel" like they had a good experience.

Accountability on the TSA's part would go a long way.

Anonymous said...

Miscommunication, retraining, refresher courses, got a problem call the 800 number??

How many times is the TSA going to repeat these lyrics to this song. How many times do we have to hear about TSO's who steal abuse passengers, and invent policies that don't exist. As long as passengers have no protection this is only going to get worse.

Anonymous said...

Well, this explains something: the continued incompetence of TSA with regard to communication.

Anonymous said...

Our Founding Fathers would turn in their graves, if they could see what depths our country has fallen to for this to ever happen.

Anonymous said...

That clarified just about nothing.

Nadav said...

Miscommunication? Sorry, that sounds like an excuse. If the TSOs required her to remove her "money belt", didn't Mrs. Zimmerman say that she doesn't have one?

There are too many holes in this story.

Nadav

Anonymous said...

OK TSA, now it is time to ANSWER some of the questions that have been asked about this issue by the people who own this country and pay your salary.

How DO you define a "Strip Search"? is it only a strip search where the person has to become fully nude with buttocks spread?

How DID your staff come to believe that the item mentioned was a "money belt"?

WHY did your staff violate several stated procedures? What is the consequences of their misconduct?

Since you took the time to post an additional "clarification" how about actually answering the questions that remain?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous wrote: Well, this explains something: the continued incompetence of TSA with regard to communication.

It's not just in regard to communication. The TSA has yet to demonstrate competence in any field at all.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous wrote: Let's pretend it was a money belt. So what? Why would that have to be removed? Can't hide a gun in a money belt. (And, even if you could, that's what the metal detector is for.)

How are those poor TSA screeners supposed to steal her money if they're not allowed to force her to remove the money belt?

RB said...

Dead link:

People wanted to know why we had her remove her back brace when our web page clearly states that our officers


Bad link:


Here are a few tips to keep in mind. You can find many more tips for traveling with disabilities here at our web page.

Anonymous said...

Instead of admonishing average Americans to learn the rules, it would be better if you "re-trained" your entire so-called professional workforce. Clearly, TSA employees are not instructed to help passengers keep their belongings in view or treat passengers with dignity and respect. The TSA leadership does not have any clue as to what average Americans endure and "tolerate" at US airport checkpoints.

The TSA is national disgrace.

Chesney said...

Restating what the policy is on this blog does NOT stop your agents from doing their own thing. How many stories have we heard of agents clearly not following TSA's own stated policy? How many mothers have been caught on camera with their breast milk being confiscated and ignored when telling the TSOs the policy states they can travel with it? Same with medication. People have taken print-outs from TSA's own website to vouch for them but are STILL ignored. Tell me what is to stop them from ignoring someone who protests removing clothing? This blog post is all well and good but does NOTHING to protect people and gives them nothing to protect themselves with. All it does is arm them with the knowledge of what it's SUPPOSED to be like during the screening procedure. What will actually happen will be a bunch of TSOs gathering around trying to intimidate the person for speaking out and threatening them with calling LEOs for arrest or making them miss their flights.

RB said...

The title of this article would have us believe that the screening of three senior citizens at JFK are being discussed.

That simple is not the case as the only person mentioned is Mrs. Zimmerman.

What vile things did TSA subject the other two ladies to?

Anonymous said...

"..our officers were told that the passenger was wearing a money belt."

Lovely use of the passive voice to avoid taking any responsibility there, Bob.

How did you do in English at school?

Anonymous said...

Have you ever seen the damage a fully-loaded money belt can do? I have, and it isn't pretty. Seriously, dollars flew *everywhere.*

Anonymous said...

Money belt? Did your employees say "take that thing off now?" or did they say "take the money belt off now?"

Because if they said money belt, she could have said "it's not a money belt, it's a back brace."

And if she did say that, it is obvious that you didn't believe her anyway.

This story doesn't make any sense. Stop with the excuses and just admit that your employees didn't follow protocol.

Scott said...

I'm curious as to whether or not they actually believe the garbage coming out of their own mouths. There are examples all the time showing that this is all lies, take for example the lady who recently had to have her back brace removed, because they thought it was a "Money Belt". http://campaign2012.washingtonexaminer.com/blogs/beltway-confidential/tsa-thought-womans-back-brace-was-money-belt/249971

There has been many documented instances of people being strip searched, and removing medical equipment. A strip search is any search that involves the removal of clothing, regardless whether or not you call it that. The TSA is frequently being caught stealing passengers belongings, strip searching passengers, and groping genitalia, yet they deny it, even when it is caught on video. The TSA needs to be disbanded, they are simply robbing us of our freedoms (and a few iPads). I'd be willing to bet they don't read the comments, as they know we are simply pointing out their lies. I'd love a personal response to these lies, and I'd LOVE for them to prove me wrong, and that all these people are lying.
It is ironic that when the roles are reversed, they respond with "the agency will not tolerate assaults against its workforce." (article here: http://travel.usatoday.com/flights/post/2011/07/tsa-agent-grope-phoenix/177327/1 )
So, we are supposed to allow them to grope us, and violate our liberties, but we are not allowed to return the favor? Come on TSA, let's have a talk about this. Better yet, lets have a talk in a public forum, perhaps on TV where the entire country can see how you lie. Prove to me, that the THOUSANDS of passengers who have stated they were groped, stolen from, or strip searched are lying. You don't have proof, why? Because it is the TSA that is lying!

Anonymous said...

The TSA needs to read the definition of strip search. Even removal of shoes, belt or jacket is considered a partial strip search and I have, personally, endured far worse than that at the hands of TSA agents. You also claim that special measures are taken for the disabled. This is a lie. I walk with a cane and need it to stand or walk, yet it has been taken from me on several occasions to be scanned without being offered a place to sit. I asked for a chair and the screener told me I could sit on the floor. Twice I have had my belongings taken from me and been subjected to extra security measures because I had the gall to carry a laptop in an aluminum brief case (an ATA and TSA approved flight case). You can keep up the lies, but we aren't buying it.

Anonymous said...

Bob,

While you are clarifying would you please clarify this?

A traveler was referred by the TSA to LEOs. Their crime? Prescription pills not in original container.

I use a day by day organizer to help me make sure i take my medications.

Can I expect the TSA to turn me over to police?

Anonymous said...

With regard to screening of passengers you state: 'It makes things easier for everybody if ALL parties know in advance what to expect'.
This is seems very reasonable. But I and others have asked the question below MANY times and it has never been answered:

What happens if a passenger with a prosthesis just beneath the skin alarms as an anomaly?

Will you answer the question so that ALL parties know in advance what to expect?
Not a chance. You say one thing and do something totally different.

Anonymous said...

Gee Bob. how can I learn your agency rules before I travel when you say they are SSI and I am not entitled to see them?

How can I observe my property at all times dduring the screenong process when you take me into a private room, remove the brace I require to move (either move at all or move with less pain) and then take it out of the room to xray it?

Anonymous said...

"Dignity and respect"? When your screener screamed at my 12 year old son for holding out a folded boarding pass (which she snatched from his hand) was that dignity or respect? OR both? I think you can tell by the hail of comments how your agency is perceived by the public. I anxiously await the day the TSA is disbanded.

scud said...

sure i buy that crap, after i am the avg amerikan fool.

SarahW said...

If the passenger must lift or remove clothing, it's a strip search. IT"S A STRIP SEARCH. If an 80 year old woman has to lower her underwear for an agent to get on the plane, IT"S A STRIP SEARCH.

Parsing and dissembling (AKA lying) is not helping your case that TSA acted properly. If this is your procedure, your procedures need to change.

Anonymous said...

please shut down we don't need you anymore than we did before 2001 you are a prime example of government waste

RB said...

TSA does not, and has never, conducted strip searches


REALLY?

Anonymous said...

Why are paper drapes available if clothing is not being removed?

http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/specialneeds/editorial_1370.shtm

"Please notify Security Officers if you need assistance during the screening process such as a hand, arm, or shoulder to lean upon, or a chair in which to sit. At any time during the screening process you can request a disposable paper drape for privacy."

RB said...

Why are people being forced to under go private screening against their wishes?

http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/specialneeds/editorial_1370.shtm

You have the right to refuse the offer of a private screening; however, you will need to allow the screening to be conducted publicly if you wish to proceed beyond the security checkpoint.

Anonymous said...

I'll be completely honest. Either the people writing this blog have no idea what TSA actually does in the airports or they are choosing to misrepresent it here.

If I ever have to deal with some of the things I have seen done to other passengers, I probably won't be able to handle it. As a rape survivor, being told to be quiet and deal with it while someone touches me in ways that are considered sexual assault normally is really something I can not do just to get on a plane.

I am a little nervous posting this, even anonymously, because I don't want to be retaliated against when I go to the airport again.

Anonymous said...

All we want is what the TSA says to match what you actually do. Stop "busting myths" and making excuses for the rampant violations by screeners. Do something about it and we will be happen. Don't do anything about it - ignore it as you are - and people will be mad. It's really that simple. There are plenty of great screeners, and I bet they hate the screeners who steal, mishandle pat-downs, make up rules and yell at women and children.

I travel ~10-12 times a year, and I have items stolen from me or get yelled at about things that are clearly allowed about a quarter of the time.

It's not emotional, or political, or even difficult to understand. Your people are providing a bad service because they are uneducated about the law, untrained, and steal. Do a better job instead of writing a make-excuses blog.

Anonymous said...

Your so good at looking for money belts its sickening,But on the other hand I just completed a 5 segment coast to coast and return flight and you never noticed the Swiss army knife in the bottom of my carry-on.
Oh and why do you give police type uniforms to people who aren't. Intimidation factor maybe. Anyhow keep up the so-so work !

Anonymous said...

TAKE THE TRAIN CAR POOL USE THE BUS BOYCOTT AIRPORTS>

Anonymous said...

First, like many posters above and tied to personal experiences in air travel, your "story" rings false. You were told a barely possible story in order to cover up the actions of employees that made a mistake and you are compounding the issue by repeating it here.

To be honest, many of us can easily see the massive disconnect between "management" and the TSA screeners. It's all well and good to set policy, but if management is not actively putting themselves in a regular position to be anonymously screened, they'll never actually know whether or not said policies are being followed. You are blindly assuming the screeners are (a) reading the policies, (b) understanding the intent of the policies and (c) actually following the policies as intended. I can assure you that none of those options are true for all TSA employees.

SarahW said...

Chesney, you suggested TSA agents receive remedial training in TSA policy.

Since the employees have power to make life miserable for passengers in an assortment of ways, you are right that training the public isn't much help. But it isn't much help to retrain agents, either. They will always skirt the rules in tacitly permitted and even encouraged ways to make their jobs easier or to get access to property and persons that suit their individual whims and vices.

Since TSA screening is not effective at its purposes, (improving confidence in security, making flights actually secure) the correct option now is to eliminate the agency as it exists. Airlines should have their own security and bear the burden of doing it right and keeping customrers.

SarahW said...

passengers should not be required to remove clothing. This passenger and others like her have been asked to remove clothing.

That's stripping. Playing around with words does not change the wrongness of requiring this passenger to lower her pants and underwear to accomodate a search or be denied passage on a flight. (or worse)

Anonymous said...

Is this blog supposed to make the TSA seem more personable or something? Do you not realize that people hate the TSA even more than the IRS? This post is a tepid rationalization for terrorizing Americans, and you should be ashamed of yourselves for constantly abusing your authority.

Anonymous said...

It's such a joke.

Any terrorist could set off a bomb at the enormous checkpoint cue and cause exactly as much terror as setting it off on the plane.

This is all theater.

Anonymous said...

All the horror stories I hear about the TSA make me never want to fly again. The TSA figures it can live with a policy of faux apology and continue to victimize people under the false guise of security.

Here's a tip: hire intelligent people. I know it's difficult to find someone with a lick of sense, but you get a great return on your investment!

Anonymous said...

My 83 year old grandmother was forced out of her wheelchair and made to stand/lean on a counter while she was frisked because she couldn't stand without assistance.

Congratulations, the world is safe from one more old lady.

Anonymous said...

didnt this happen recently with an 8 year old and leg braces? lies on top of lies, moneybelt really? Why act like it's miscommunication when it's clearly poor training and lack of managerial oversight. Moneybelt?!?!

Anonymous said...

Money belts have to be removed for easier TSA theft of the contents. Amirite or what?

Anonymous said...

“TSA does not, and has never, conducted strip searches and no strip searches occurred in any of these incidents. “ and “TSA officers do not ask passengers to remove clothing to expose a sensitive area or to remove a medical device or brace.”

From the TSA's website:

TSA Guidelines link

"At any time during the screening process you can request a disposable paper drape for privacy."

Why make a provision for paper drapes to protect privacy if nobody is ever asked to remove their clothes?

JPT said...

'They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.'- B Franklin.

This 'security-theater' has gone on long enough. The TSA is not protecting us from anything, rather they are the perpetrators. It is time for all flyers everywhere to write their Congressmen and Senators and ask that this waste of taxpayer money be abolished.

Anonymous said...

The TSA is out of control, I can accept the full body scan, but really? Since we are paying for this, I would like you all fired. I'd rather take my chances with the terrorists than watch you politically correct idiots strip search an 80 year old woman. Profiling is really not a bad thing.

Anonymous said...

TSA still owes me $2000 for destroying my luggage and everything inside it, after someone examining my baggage dumped a 2-liter of pepsi, a bag of chips, and a bologna sandwich inside it. I was not carrying pepsi, chips, or sandwiches.

BTW, TSA being a government mandated authority, it is against the Constitution for you to search me unless you have reason to believe that I have committed a crime against property.

Anonymous said...

Are you guys still making war veterans remove their prosthetic limbs?

Richard Rowell said...

After being groped by a TSA agent in Denver last year on my way back from New Mexico, I do not fly anymore. I remember a businessman walking by while the humiliation occured and him commenting "in most places you pay extra for that".

That is what the TSA is, a very bad joke.

Curtis said...

This is hogwash, Bob, and I think that you know that. You said "Here’s what happened: There was a bit of a miscommunication and our officers were told that the passenger was wearing a money belt." Ha ha! You see! It was all a bit of a miscommunication. Except that's not what you said in the original post- You said "Here is what we know so far. . .
The passenger opted out of advanced imaging technology screening, requested a pat-down and told the officers that she was wearing a back brace or support belt which required private screening."
Can't you just say "we screwed up"? It would be so much easier than throwing every lie you can think of at the public to see what sticks.

Oscar said...

I think that any effort to make transportation safer is good, no matter what it takes.

Anonymous said...

When I was 17, the TSA actually stole my -panties- out of my suitcase. ALL of my panties. They left a note stating that my bag had been searched...because my algebra textbook was heavy, square, and therefor a weapon.

I just wanted you jerks to know that I may be 24 now, but some of your men, somewhere, have an UNDERAGED GIRL'S PANTIES. Congratulations.

I also suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Androphobia, and the TSA officers have done almost nothing to help with either problem. It's gotten to the point that I have to get to the screening early because I refuse the xrays, and afterward I'm usually so shaken up that I have to use an inhaler, take two xanax (perscription), and cry for a few minutes. The last time I flew, the strange hands on me made me throw up.

I'm taking the bus. No trip is worth flashbacks and panic.

Anonymous said...

I do not believe you.

I do not trust you.

You have no credibility.

Anonymous said...

"Passengers should always be in view of their belongings."

Ha! I refused to go through the death scanner so had to opt for the pat down. While I was waiting off the side (for about 10 minutes by the way), I was no where near my belongings. I couldn't even see them!

This country's going to hell.

Anonymous said...

The TSA Lies to the American Public!
They try to pretend they are police even though they have badges and call each other officers. They are not law enforcement. They are not constitutionally allowed to search people. That is why he said that the TSA does not make people lift up their shirts or do strip searches. By doing things like that, they would be doing things that only a sworn law enforment officer can do.

The TSA is only reactive and not proactive Why do we remove our shoes to go through security only after the shoe bomb? Pretty soon, we will have to remove our underwear in front of TSA agents because of the underwear bomber.

Kat said...

TSA officers do not ask passengers to remove clothing to expose a sensitive area or to remove a medical device or brace. We have special procedures that allow us to safely screen passengers with disabilities.

This is, of course, why ostomy patients have been forced to show their bags, why a cancer survuvor ended up soaked in his own urine, why another cancer survivor had to show her prosthetic breast, and why I can't travel by air because I wear urinary incontinence pads due to my cancer surgery and would, by recommendation of my oncologist, have to opt out of your scanners. Whether I opt out or not, I would be subject to a retaliatory groping -- because the pad would show as an anomaly on the scanner.

Notification cards, are a great way for passengers to discreetly let us know about a medical condition or disability. Passengers may present these cards at the checkpoint to our officers.

These will promptly be ignored by the TSOs. One TSO informed me that even a letter from my doctor would be irrelevant "because anyone could forge one of those."

Passengers should always be in view of their belongings. If you can’t see your belongings during secondary screening, please request that an officer bring them to you.

And what do you do if the TSO in question refuses to bring those belongings, stating that you cannot have your possessions until your screening is completed?

TSOs do not accept responsibility for lost property. Not to mention the fact that TSOs steal things. What does a passenger do when the TSO threatens arrest for attempting to claim one's belongings? What redress does a passenger have for being smacked on the hands for reaching to prevent a TSO with filthy gloves from handling her food?

Passengers who know they may need additional screening ahead of time may contact a TSA customer support manager at their departure airport ahead of travel to ensure their needs are met. If private screening is needed, passengers are free to have a family member or travel companion join them in the private screening room.

That's nice. What does a passenger do when the so-called customer service manager doesn't know the posted policies? When they insist that your food is not permitted because the voice
announcement and the signs say "Three Ounces of Liquid," even though the stated policy is 3.4 ounces or 100 milliliters? And that medically required food is not permitted on the plane, despite a doctor's letter, and the fact that the TSO in question has no medical training? We must remember that you had the money to change the signs to include QR codes, but that it was too expensive to put the correct amounts on those signs at the same time.

Here are some resources for more information and ways to contact TSA in both the field and at Headquarters.

Again, what good does it do? Field workers don't know the rules and are not held to the web-posted standard. Why expect office workers to know them?

TSA can be proud. I desperately wanted to see a friend in the UK who was not well. I can't travel because of the TSA's refusal to properly train its employees. Well, my friend died last week, of a massive stroke. I will never see her again... thanks to the TSA.

Anonymous said...

I have used the Talk to TSA a couple times and no one ever replied. Why should I bother submitting issues through that form? It doesn't seem to make a difference.

chrismeredith said...

How Much training is it going to take to get it right? I keep hearing (on a weekly basis) that "we are going to refresh the training".
This is getting to the point that TSA is a laughingstock and is being derided by the citizenship. If this agency were being run by a private agency/company ther would have been some very high profile changes, people being fired etc..
Mistakes are made all the time, to err is human, but to tell me it is raining while you are urinating on my back is unacceptable. Please either make the changes and meet the needs of the public or let us know the situation is hopeless and let someone else do the job.

Anonymous said...

"SAFETY FIRST UNDER ANY CONDITIONS."

No, no, one thousand times NO. Safety is not guaranteed by the Constitution, liberty is. You want safety? Live in your basement and pray no harm befalls you. If you want liberty, protect our dear civil liberties.

Anonymous said...

"Standing in the screening line is hardly the venue for debate over it's necessity."

Agreed. Write your Representative and Senators and require them to reform, if not abolish theTSA.

Anonymous said...

"We truly regret these passengers feel they had a bad screening experience"

You disingenuous piece of garbage. I regret your inability to offer sincerity, or to truly REGRET PASSENGERS HAD A BAD EXPERIENCE. Do not regret their "feelings". That is not your business to be so condescending as to suggest such a ludicrously false apology.

George said...

OK, so here we have yet another instance of "miscommunication" (your apparent euphemism for "incompetence") of a TSO that was sufficiently egregious and embarrassing that it couldn't be ignored, dismissed, or defended. So your senior leadership feels compelled to react by putting some new procedures in place, including the infamous "refresher training." Passengers can now call a phone number, presumably to hear a human being provide "guidance" from headquarters.

So how does this really solve the all-too-frequent disconnect between what Blogger Bob insists should happen and what actually does (or doesn't) happen at checkpoints? What recourse does a passenger actually have when an incompetent TSO botches the "security protocol" and acts contrary to what the "guidance" leads the passenger to expect?

It's good that TSA senior leadership has been forced to at least acknowledge that they have a problem with screeners handling "exceptions" properly. But does this reactive patch do anything to address the well-known systemic problem of extreme inconsistency in the knowledge, intelligence, and competence of TSOs? That inconsistency is merely annoying for most passengers, but for those with medical issues or disabilities it can be needlessly humiliating or even life-threatening. It's fine that senior leadership is reacting to the latest of too many embarrassing "incidents." But what are they doing to address the root cause?

If you can't see your belongings during secondary screening, please request that an officer bring them to you.

Does this mean officers are obligated to do this? Or is this one of those things they might do if they feel like it? What recourse does a passenger have if the officer responds to the request with "DYWTFT?" And what about primary screening, when a passenger may lose sight of belongings during AIT scanning?

Anonymous said...

"(because as an MD I will not allow you to irradiate me with no medical benefit)"

And if you were an actual MD, you'd know those devices are perfectly safe. Here's an idea: turn off Fox News, and try reading what a REPUTABLE scientist has to say, especially about those milimeter wave scanners.
Go as a Longbow Apache pilot if he suffers from "radiation" problems, because that radar on top of the rotor bombards the crew with much stronger milimeter waves.

For those of us Americans who don't like the TSA, exercise your Constitutional rights to take the bus.

john said...

Hi there,

It was good to listen that TSA are also providing customer care services providing a number in order to contact them.

Anonymous said...

I don't understand this talk of "rules".

In this very blog we're told that TSA people follow the rules but the rules are often skipped to keep terrorists off guard. If the rules are skipped, how can there be any rules?

Anything goes. The passengers have no right to dignity.

Anonymous said...

"...we wanted to ensure our readers understand this:
TSA does not, and has never, conducted strip searches and no strip searches occurred in any of these incidents. "

I'm glad you want blog readers to understand this but a solemnly worded statement that is false. I do not understand this because it's untrue. You may say that official policy has never allowed TSOs to conduct strip searches and you may say that TSA policy does not require removal of medical devices. The reality, however, is that both have occurred. In the case referenced, it is evident and, in fact, freely admitted that TSA policy was violated.

I want the TSA to understand this: The TSA is a poorly run organization whose undereducated and poorly trained workforce habitually violates its own policies and humiliates passengers while pursuing a very poor security model.

Congress must mandate that a private, professional security force be hired. Such a force will be cheaper, more effective and respect passenger rights.

RB said...

Just wondering how a TSA Public Affairs person can keep their job if this blog is any indication of swaying the publics beliefs.

Seems few believe the empty words TSA is shoveling.

Anonymous said...

"And if you were an actual MD, you'd know those devices are perfectly safe. Here's an idea: turn off Fox News, and try reading what a REPUTABLE scientist has to say, especially about those milimeter wave scanners."

I can't get past the FDA's guidance that humans should not be exposed to radiation unless there's a medical benefit. Care to cite what your "reputable scientists" have to say? Bear in mind, that you suggest they will say that exposure to radiation is "safe." I, along with others, eagerly anticipate your response.

Please forego the entirely useless ad hominem attack next time. It undermines your credibility and has nothing whatsoever to do with correctness.

"Go as[k] a Longbow Apache pilot if he suffers from "radiation" problems, because that radar on top of the rotor bombards the crew with much stronger milimeter waves."

Actually the cockpit of the AH-64 is in an antenna null that is, at least, 20 dB down from the main lobe; the pilot being more in the null than the CPG.

Additionally, there are indications that AH64 crews *may* experience an increased risk of certain cancers although it's not clear if that's shared by all military aircrew as, for example, exposure to certain chemicals might create.

Go ahead and respond. I'll eagerly anticipate your response and promise not to attack you in the manner you attacked the original poster.

Anonymous said...

Oscar said...
"I think that any effort to make transportation safer is good, no matter what it takes."

Fantastic. I'll swing by your house this afternoon to modify your car so that it cannot exceed 20 mph. Actually, make it 10 mph... after all, better safe than sorry, right?

Do you "safety before anything" folks even think before you write?

RB said...

How many Strip Searches and TSA Rub Downs did this person conduct while emplyed by TSA?

BOSTON -- A former employee of the U.S. Transportation Security Administration has pleaded guilty to having thousands of child pornography images and videos on his home computers.


Posting is on topic and in full compliance with TSA posting guidelines.

Screen shot captured!

Anonymous said...

I must be in the minority. I am a frequent flyer both here and in Europe. I have never been "groped", mistreated, or had anything stolen or damaged. I line up, take off my shoes, produce my liquids and laptop, go through the walkway when my turn comes, and there's never any drama. If they want to search my carryon, then they search it while I watch. There's never anything in there to cause a problem - usually an odd-shaped gift of some sort.

Anonymous said...

Oscar said...
"I think that any effort to make transportation safer is good, no matter what it takes."

I think you are a very dangerous person who is willing to give up all of our hard-won rights for a little pretend security. If America falls it will because people like you gave it away.

KP said...

Oscar said...
"I think that any effort to make transportation safer is good, no matter what it takes."

I do believe it was posted earlier, but...

"Those who would give up essential liberty, to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." ~ Benjamin Franklin

You, sir, deserve neither.



As for the TSA, as long as you are accountable to no one, no amount of spin, PR, victim-blaming or outright cover ups are going to change the way people see you. The fact is you hire unqualified people and give them bare minimum training so that you can CYA when they inevitably screw up. And THEN you have the gall to deny your workers could possibly have screwed up in the first place? Newsflash: Unless you've replaced your workers with infallible androids programmed to operate only within TSA approved parameters, your workers are HUMAN BEINGS. To trust that human beings are always going to know and follow the rules is just moronic. If there were some accountability, then you could flush out the bad ones instead of just giving them badges and letting them run off and play cops-and-terrorists. Instead, you're manufacturing your own downfall. People can't live in fear forever... something's gotta give.

Anonymous said...

Wellllll, here we go again! All of these "bloggers" compaining because some little old lady was confused and didn't know how to tell the offciers she was wearing a medial device. That's her fault, not there's, anybody can see that, EXCEPT the "bloggers" who don't have anything better to do with there time except make life difficult for people who are trying to obey the law. NUF SAID.

Anonymous said...

Hi,
I am an avid fisherman and I have some $300 fishing reels and $500 rods, as well as expensive Japanese lures that I am afraid to check in for fear of theft. Obviously there are medium sized treble hooks on the lures, but they are well packaged and pose no more danger to anyone than a camera. I am also afraid that if I bring the tackle as carry-on, it will be dis-allowed or confiscated at security checkpoint.
What is your recommendation in this situation? Thanks.

Anonymous said...

I'm really getting tired of all the complaining that is going on regarding TSA procedures. I have two words: SHUT UP !!!!
Tell ya what, let's shut down TSA and have NO security precedures at the airports. That will have some direct and indirect effects on our country and ir travel.
1. Lines will be shorter and boarding will be quicker.
2.Government spending will be reduced by the amount needed to run TSA.
3. Unemployment rates and cost will go up because of all those laid off TSA Officers.
4. Airline flights will increase until the first plane gets blown out of the sky because there was no security to prevent the IED that took down the plane.
5. Unemployement will increase again because of all the flight travel related jobs that were lost after the flight bombing. Flight levels will once again drop to post 9/11 levels and this time it will probably take more than three years the get flight levels back to normal.
6. And the people who died on the plane, they are dead but at least we did not infringe on their rights to privacy or their civil rights.
7. TSA is in a win/lose situation. They're damned for doing their job and will really be damned if they don't. Is TSA perfect? No. But you really should be thanking them for keeping you alive and save your complaints for the sickos that are responsible for your flight inconveniences.
It's been ten years since 9/11 occurred and people have forgotten why TSA is there: TO PROTECT LIFE BECAUSE BECAUSE THERE ARE STILL PEOPLE OUT THERE WAITING FOR ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY TO KILL YOU.

Anonymous said...

Oscar... really?

"I think that any effort to make transportation safer is good, no matter what it takes."

Do you own a car? Do you own a cell phone? Do you use one at the same time as using the other? If so then you yourself are reducing the safety of transportation.

And then for the readers...

Write your elected officials. Make the TSA important to them. Make the TSA an 'election issue.' Make it so they can't ignore the TSA. Make them make the TSA quit ignoring us, the very people who are paying the TSA.

Anonymous said...

Eleven sexual offenders working for the TSA have been arrested this year alone. They had intimate contact with thousands of people at the checkpoint. Is that making any of us safer? I think not.

Anonymous said...

" some little old lady was confused and didn't know how to tell the offciers she was wearing a medial device. "


Blame the victim. TSA defenders are never classy.

Anonymous said...

[[I have two words: SHUT UP !]]

Silencing people who are correct has never worked, bub. Truth will out.

[[let's shut down TSA and have NO security precedures at the airports]]

Congratulation on this fine specimen of a straw man.

[[Airline flights will increase until the first plane gets blown out of the sky because there was no security to prevent the IED that took down the plane.]]

TSA coesn't look for "IEDs". So they're irrelevant to your equation.

[[And the people who died on the plane, they are dead but at least we did not infringe on their rights to privacy or their civil rights.]]

Actually, the feds have been violating passenger civil rights since the Johnson Administration's FAA installed the first magnetometers in response to the "Fly This Plane To Cuba" non-epidemic. So those flying on 9-11 had their civil rights violated as well - and look what good it did them.

Yeah ... that's right: none. Which is pretty much exactly the good that's being done now, only more notoriously.

[[you really should be thanking them for keeping you alive ]]

Well, see ... TSA themselves say that isn't their job.

[[people have forgotten why TSA is there]]

No, not really. From the citizen perspective, it's there to keep those who are scared of their own shadows [like yourself] convinced that the government is doing something. From the government perspective, it's there to justify an inappropriate power-grab.

[[THERE ARE STILL PEOPLE OUT THERE WAITING FOR ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY TO KILL YOU]]

There always has been and there always will be. The proper response is "so what else is new?" If the government wants to find them before they can even try, there are rules in place - very clearly written by the way - which describes how the government is allowed to go about doing it. I doubt there'd be many folks currently criticizing TSA who would still be critical of TSA were they to suddenly follow those rules.

Because that's what you hyperventilating ninnies continually fail to understand: it's not so much WHAT they do, it's HOW they do it ... by not following the rules. You wanna search people? come up with Probable Cause and get a warrant.

Really, how difficult is this to understand?

rwilymz
http://dblyelloline.blogspot.com/

Anonymous said...

"Tell ya what, let's shut down TSA and have NO security precedures at the airports. That will have some direct and indirect effects on our country and ir travel."

Good idea - let's let airlines institute real security. As it is, we're not particularly safe, we're losing our liberties and we're spending billions we don't have.

Anonymous said...

"TO PROTECT LIFE BECAUSE BECAUSE THERE ARE STILL PEOPLE OUT THERE WAITING FOR ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY TO KILL YOU."

Presumably there are people everyhwere who wish to harm me for political purposes. Why do you think the TSA is discharging its duties well?

Are you familiar with the report, recently released, that detailed the TSA's multitude of shortcoming? For the money we're paying, we're getting very little performance.

Anonymous said...

"3. Unemployment rates and cost will go up because of all those laid off TSA Officers."

Let's hire every unemployed person in the country to be a TSA employee - note that the "officer" title will soon be a thing of the past - and reduce unemployment to zero!

Anonymous said...

"Wellllll, here we go again!"

Well, at least here you go again, TSA employee.

"All of these "bloggers" compaining because some little old lady was confused and didn't know how to tell the offciers she was wearing a medial device."

By all accounts, the passenger said she was wearing a back brace. Do you know something the rest of us don't? Please enlighten us.

"That's her fault, not there's, anybody can see that, EXCEPT the "bloggers" who don't have anything better to do with there time except make life difficult for people who are trying to obey the law."

Why is this the passenger's fault? The true violation here was when the TSO asked the passenger to remove a medical device. That's a violation of TSA policy. The TSO should be fired.

"NUF SAID."

Too much, actually. By mocking those of us who oppose the TSA, you show the vacuity of your position. Make your point, make it well. Make it forcefully. When you mock those of us with well-founded opposition, you just highlight that you have no information to back up your point of view.

Also, no need to put quotation marks around "blogger." People who post here are certainly bloggers. (note my use of quotation marks is correct)

Anonymous said...

I have a couple of things to say to u complainers.
Why the heck are u complaining anyway?
Enough with your talks about losing rights and having your privacy invaded. Do u fly every single day? Every week? If so then u should be able to deal with it, u fly for business u say? Then waiting in line and going through a checkpoint shouldnt deter you. You need to make money the tsa employees need to make money. Leave them alone for godsakes and stop writing these idiotic comments about your rights being taken away because you were bothered for 3 mins of your life.

Jim Huggins said...

Care to update this story --- on the front page --- now that TSA has admitted it screened these passengers improperly?

Anonymous said...

Will you be updating this post now that DHS has admitted you really did strip search these citizens?

learning English text said...

How Much training is it going to take to get it right? I keep hearing (on a weekly basis) that "we are going to refresh the training".