Friday, November 11, 2011

Veterans Day: Thank You To All Who Have Served Or Are Serving

Veteran's Day PosterI wanted to take a moment to recognize the Veterans of our armed forces. TSA employs a large number of Veterans, me included. I was in the U.S. Army’s 3rd Armored Division from 1988 -1991 and was stationed in Frankfurt, Germany. I also took a little 6 month trip to Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Kuwait. I prefer Germany…

I served three years, but a friend of mine who joined the same time as I did, recently retired. It’s amazing how many places he’s been the last 20 years and how decked out his uniform is.  He and many others have made a lot of sacrifices and we should take a few moments, especially today, to think about all of the men and women who have served or are serving our country.

There are thousands of stories to tell from many of TSA and DHS’s Veterans, but here are a few I know of that I can share with you now.

This great story talks about how some of TSA’s Veterans are taking care of wounded soldiers as a part of the Wounded Warrior Escort Program. Wounded Warrior Escort program eases air travel for veterans

Here’s an opinion piece from News-Press.com from the Federal Security Director for the Southwest Florida International Airport and the Charlotte County Airport. He explains in his story how he feels the war front prepared him for a career with TSA.

Here’s a great story/video about a TSA employee and an Iraq War Veteran who served two tours with the U.S. Air Force and is now a handler for an explosive-detection dog at Denver’s DIA airport. Qualls and Rhoden:Working to keep DIA safe

DHS Deputy Secretary Jane Holl Lute is an Army Veteran and she has a post up today at the White House Blog about DHS employees who have served in the military. The Department of Homeland Security's Commitment to Veterans

Thank you to all who have served or are serving. 

TSA Blog Team

If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

32 comments:

Anonymous said...

I notice that many of your date related posts (like this one) get posted at the end of the work day. Have you considered having the posts ready to put up in the morning instead of at the end of the day your post is about?

Wintermute said...

Irony: An organization who stips this great nation's citizens of their liberties thanking a group of people who served to protect those liberties. As a former member of the USAF, might I suggest you thank us by giving us back our liberties?

Ragnar said...

Yes, thank you for your service. Now take off your boots and open your bag. Yes, I know you went through security when you left Qatar/Kuwait/Iraq/Some other crappy hole, but you might have gotten a weapon or some other contraband while you were on that jet to here.

True story. Left Qatar on a 767, was run thru the usual security checks before boarding. Flew to Germany to get gas but never left the secure area. Landed in Baltimore, never left the secure area and still had to take off our boots and open our bags before boarding our flight. Really? What kind of joke is that?

So save your fake sincerity and fake security. Wanna thank me? Show me probable cause for searching my person and property in accordance with the 4th Amendment to the US Constitution.

Anonymous said...

Wow - This is the first time I have ever agreed with Bob. But I am surprised that any military veterans would work for an agency that is so bent on depriving citizens of their 4th amendment rights. As a former Army Officer, I am appalled at the behavior of the TSA.

Anonymous said...

Ragnar,
Well said, well said. Those who served in WWII (my grandfather included) would NEVER have allowed themselves, their wife, or their children to be groped in name of freedom.

Anonymous said...

I served proudly and see nothing wrong with TSA procedures.

John said...

While we may not agree on the TSA and their methods, at least it is has become safer to fly IMHO.

Anonymous said...

Irony I can't bring pliers, an adjustable wrench, or a screwdriver in my carry-on luggage.

Without them, how am I supposed to tamper with the smoke detector in the lavatory?

Caroline Sound said...

I really thought that there couldn't possibly be any objections to this post! However it never ceases to amaze me how people can twist a heart felt and respectful post like this and once again put the boot in!

Anonymous said...

"While we may not agree on the TSA and their methods, at least it is has become safer to fly IMHO."

Safer since when? If you mean since 9/11, I do not agree. Remember that nothing the hijackers took through security were disallowed at the time.

Anonymous said...

Ragnar for Congress.

Ex-AF, current DoD contractor, am amazed at how many people purporting to "defend" us are clueless about what needs defending.

A free society that loses its freedom to defend its existence is a society that has voluntarily capitulated to whatever "enemy" it sees - real or imaginary.

A free society must first defend its freedom. Among those freedoms is the right to be presumed innocent as well as the right to be left alone.

rwilymz
http://dblyelloline.blogspot.com/

USAF, Retired said...

"Caroline Sound said, on November 14, 2011, at 7:34 AM:

I really thought that there couldn't possibly be any objections to this post! However it never ceases to amaze me how people can twist a heart felt and respectful post like this and once again put the boot in!"

Caroline,

This is NOT "a heart felt and respectful post." It is patronizing and an insult to everyone who has ever worn the uniform protecting the rights and liberties the TSA takes away at 500 airports in the United States of America every day.

Mass Painters said...

TSA needs to find a more innovative, but private way of executing their business needs. Their workforce culture and attitude is certainly not going to make the public feel better about these issues.

Anonymous said...

John said...
"While we may not agree on the TSA and their methods, at least it is has become safer to fly IMHO."

I may make you feel warm and fuzzy to believe that, but you aren't actually any safer.

The TSA puts on a big show, but they aren't very effective. The TSA security line has actually created a new target that nearly as good as an airplane.

Anonymous said...

I'll try again.

You're welcome.

I served to protect our freedom and liberties. Ironic that we are now being thanked by an organization that usurps our freedom and liberty.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous of November 14, 2011 3:21 PM said:

The TSA puts on a big show, but they aren't very effective. The TSA security line has actually created a new target that nearly as good as an airplane.

Actually, the TSA created a better target than an airplane by introducing a non-secured massed congregation area full of soft targets into our airports. Walk-up AQ-service anyone?

I arrive at any CONUS airport a couple hours early for my flight so I can "snipe" a position in the security line when it is shortest and I am through the line the quickest just for that reason. A mass of people is a tempting target for anyone wanting to do harm. This is why markets, conventions, rallies, and sporting events are such popular IED detonation locations.

Anonymous said...

Anywhere there is a long line and large amounts of people gathered in public places is a target for attack.
People wait in lines for very long times at supermarkets,concerts,stores,
sporting events, etc.

Anonymous said...

I served 8 years in the Army, and when I looked back at those who never saw war, who never served, I saw many who took everything for granted. TSA screening is not a big deal. If you can afford a plane ticket, then life is good compared to the vast majority of people in the world. You probably have air conditioning, roof over your head, clean clothes, the ability to shower. A choice of what to eat if anything at all. I read many of the comments here and I am ashamed of almost all of who post comments here. Many speak of freedom, but don't fully understand what freedom truly is...and the cost associated with it. Its a good thing I don't affiliate my serving the country, with serving those who call themselves U.S. citizens. If I had things my way, there wouldn't be a need for TSA or the military, because no one would do anyone any harm. My fantasy world will never be a reality. Stop pretending we don't need invasive screening measures. Stop using the words "liberties" and "freedom" as shields to hide your truly selfish desires to basically do what you want.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous wrote, "The TSA security line has actually created a new target that nearly as good as an airplane."

I agree with TSA measures, but Anonymous makes a great point. Lines cannot be too long or a target is presented. They obviously can't be asked to screen faster without the cost of efficiency, they should increase staffing.

Jack said...

You may be in a US Military uniform, serving our country proudly, but you're still a potential terrorist!

-TSA

Ayn R. Key said...

As a veteran, I would like to ask the TSA to stop throwing away the sacrifice veterans made in trying to protect the freedom of the American people.

Ayn R. Key said...

Bob, if you're a veteran than explain this to me. You took an oath to protect the US constitution from all enemies, foreign and domestic. Do you somehow believe that since you are no longer in the service that you can turn your back on everything you used to believe and do?

I'm out of the service as well, but I still believe in my oath very much which is why I'm such a harsh critic of the TSA.

Anonymous said...

Its either to much security or not enough security.We cant have it both ways.
Im just thankful that this country was not hit with another major attack.
Were fortunate that we dont have to see terror attacks here every week like in some other countries.
It dosent matter if your with the military, FBI,DHS,DOJ,state and local police.
All of these people at these agencies play a role in protecting this nation.When the average American is sleep or home enjoying the holidays with family,these essential employees and military are on the job working hard to protect us all.
For that I am thankful to all who protect and serve.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"Stop using the words "liberties" and "freedom" as shields to hide your truly selfish desires to basically do what you want."

I think you have it exactly backwards. The TSA supporters are the selfish ones who want themselves protected even if it requires abusing the rights of other people.

Freedom does have a price - allowing people to be free creates risk that someone will do something bad. I'm willing to take that risk rather than live in a police state where I can't do anything without getting the governments permission first.

Anonymous said...

An ex-soldier wrote:
[[TSA screening is not a big deal.]]

...unless you've read the Constitution that you once swore to defend from enemies, foreign and domestic.

And domestic means people in this country who are willing to subvert the Constitution for their own

purposes and do so improperly. TSA qualifies. Which means that their screening IS a big deal.

[[I read many of the comments here and I am ashamed of almost all of who post comments here.]]

Just as I am ashamed of yours. You come off as so gung-holier-than-thou you don't know exactly what you're

ho is so gung about. "My country right or wrong" is a lot like "my mother drunk or sober". Mindless

support does no one any good.

[[Many speak of freedom, but don't fully understand what freedom truly is...and the cost associated with

it.]]

My point exactly. The freedom to move freely without suspicion means that once in a million flights you're

going to get some bozo on an aisle seat ahead of you charging the cockpit door with a cocktail umbrella

demanding that the plane be flown to Omaha. That is the price of freedom: having to endure the bozo. It

is preposterous and paradoxical to suggest that the price of freedom is having our freedoms stripped.

Nossir. The price of freedom is having the freedoms abused by bozos.

[[Stop pretending we don't need invasive screening measures]]

Stop pretending we do.

[[Stop using the words "liberties" and "freedom" as shields to hide your truly selfish desires to basically

do what you want.]]

Here's the thing, kiddo: that's what liberty and freedom is. If the only "freedom" we are allowed is the

ability to do what the government wants us to do, then please explain the material difference between us

and, say, Iran, North Korea, Cuba, The ex-Soviet Union, Mussolini's Italy, Nazi Germany, et cetera.

Freedom is freedom because it is NOT what the government wants us to do.

So I would kindly ask, instead, that you [and those like you] please stop using "freedom" and "liberty" as

code words for your Orwellian police state. There's more than one way to prevent people from hurting each

other, and none that I can think of involve "freedom"; all involve excessive government.

rwilymz
http://dblyelloline.blogspot.com/

Anonymous said...

"I agree with TSA measures, but Anonymous makes a great point. Lines cannot be too long or a target is presented."

Yet, there's been no issue. Hmm.

"They obviously can't be asked to screen faster without the cost of efficiency, they should increase staffing."

"Obviously" can't be asked to screen faster? Typically, less than 50% of the uniformed TSA "work" force is sceening when I go through security, so it's not at all obvious to me. The solution to long lines is to become more bloated and less efficient? There are none so blind as those who refuse to see.

(screenshot captured)

Anonymous said...

"Stop pretending we don't need invasive screening measures. Stop using the words "liberties" and "freedom" as shields to hide your truly selfish desires to basically do what you want."

I'm not pretending anything. The TSA's intrusive measures do not significantly increase security.

I will selfishly protect the liberties and freedoms that I serve to protect. Why won't you?

(for the record, 24 years and counting active and reserve)

TSORon said...

I also have served. I continue to serve as a member of the TSA, as do many of my fellow TSO’s. It is more common to find veterans as TSO’s than any other type of person.

As such, I honor those who do serve, those who have served, and those who serve in a civilian role. Anything less is just selfishness.

Anonymous said...

TSORon said...
"I also have served. I continue to serve as a member of the TSA, as do many of my fellow TSO’s. It is more common to find veterans as TSO’s than any other type of person.

As such, I honor those who do serve, those who have served, and those who serve in a civilian role. Anything less is just selfishness"

Interesting assertion. Are there really more Vets in TSA than there are non Vets?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"It dosent matter if your with the military, FBI,DHS,DOJ,state and local police.
All of these people at these agencies play a role in protecting this nation."

There are many groups doing real work to stop terrorism. The go out and look for terrorists to stop them before they can hurt someone. I am thankful for the work they do.

The TSA on the other hand just sits in one place, tells everyone where they are and what they are doing, then waits for the terrorists to come to them and surrender.

Which method do you think is more effective at keeping you safe?

The only people the TSA will ever catch is:
1) People who forgot they had something
2) Really stupid people

Anonymous said...

"As such, I honor those who do serve, those who have served, and those who serve in a civilian role. Anything less is just selfishness"

So you honor yourself and assert that anyone who doesn't is selfish?

Amazing that you posted that.

Anonymous said...

I would just like to remind everyone that the 4th Amendment to our Constitution protects against unreasonable searches and seizures. These screenings are happening for a reason.
Also, thank you to all veterans who have served, much of the public greatly admires you.
I will not say that the screenings are not intrusive, because they are. I will comment that by asking for the liberties that you say have been taken away, you are asking for the liberty to bring a bomb or chemical weapon on board a plane and kill not only foreign visitors but your own fellow American civilians.