Thursday, September 1, 2011

TSA To Provide Several Artifacts to the Smithsonian National September 11 Collection

TSA Shoulder PatchTSA Historian, Michael P.C. Smith, guest blogged today for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History blog. Here’s an excerpt from his post:

“This September, Americans everywhere will reflect on the events of a Tuesday morning a decade ago; a day which forever changed our country. However as we do this, many people are unaware of the history of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the reasons for its creation.

The truth is that TSA has been, and will forever be, intimately linked to the events of September 11. The agency was created on November 19, 2001, shortly after the attacks, when the Aviation and Transportation Security Act (ATSA) was signed into law by President George W. Bush. This landmark legislation authorized the creation of a new federal government agency specifically designed to strengthen the security of the nation’s transportation systems while also ensuring the free movement of people and commerce."
 (Read the rest of Michael's post at the NMAH blog)



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16 comments:

Anonymous said...

How depressing.

RB said...

Why does TSA need a historian?

Waste of taxpayers monies!

Anonymous said...

Well I guess you failed big time. "while also ensuring the free movement of people and commerce"
TSA has been the biggest obstacle to free travel we have EVER seen.

I want to by tickets on the plane, like the old Eastern Shuttle. Nobody need to know who I am or where I am going in MY OWN COUNTRY!

Maybe I could move to North Korea and be more free.

Anna J said...

I was a member of the first screening team called the "MSF or Mobile Screening Force" that provided screening at BWI, the first federalized airport. Being the first STSO off the bus at 0100 in the morning, under the cover of darkness and the protection of the National Guard, made me realize that we are all vulnerable to attack regardless of where we live and what we do. Ten years later, I am now a TSM at DFW and my passion for committment to the job has not changed. The Smithonian is such a historical place of honor that we should all be proud to be a part of such a great institution.

Anonymous said...

The TSA does NOT deserve a mention in the Smithsonian - the TSA is a sad reminder of how out-of-control disconnected government bureaucrats can have little respect for their own citizens. The TSA has played a key role in American citizens loss of respect and confidence in authority - your organization hardly merits even a mention in a national institution such as the Smithsonian.

Chris Boyce said...

Perhaps he could include a copy of the Constitution as it existed on September 10, 2001? This would be the original version before the TSA began to ignore major portions of it.

(Screen capture made.)

Anonymous said...

For another perspective on the net benefits TSA, congress and other parts of the security enterprise have contributed in response to "day which forever changed our country," see the 9/11 Ripple video posted by CNN today: http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2011/09/specials/911.ripple/index.html?hpt=hp_c2

Anonymous said...

"And here's a piece of the US Constitution we shredded in order to "protect" the nation ..."

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"The TSA does NOT deserve a mention in the Smithsonian - the TSA is a sad reminder of how out-of-control disconnected government bureaucrats can have little respect for their own citizens."

That's why they *should* be there. It's important to remember the failures so that future generations can avoid the same mistakes. Like the McCarthy communist hunts or the WWII Japanese internment camps.

Tudor said...

Free artifacts? Post me some :)

Anonymous said...

Contrary to your "historian's" assertion, most Americans are very much aware "of the history of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the reasons for its creation." They're even more aware of what a bureaucratic monster the TSA has "evolved" into during the past decade, a monster that deserves the scorn and distrust that so many Americans have for it. That's presumably why you need to spend an unknown amount of money paying a "historian" to do an Orwellian rewrite of the TSA's deplorable history.

But you shouldn't let that inconvenient truth stop you from celebrating the upcoming Anniversary with an outpouring of self-congratulatory propaganda.

Anonymous said...

Some of the comments on this blog really make me worry about the ignorance of this nation.

The historian position is a waste of tax payers money? Really? I can think of more than enough things that our nation wastes your tax dollars on, and a man who keeps record of what happened after a serious national event doesn't seem to be one of them. Besides, do you have any idea how much "tax payers monies" are being "wasted?" Didn't think so...

I am offended by you "Americans," if you can even call yourselves that. TSA has done a great job over the past 10 years. I would love to see any of you get off your couches and do even half the work that TSA has done. What happened to your national pride? Will it take another 9/11 for you to realize how necessary things like TSA are?

You nay-sayers make me sick.

Earl Pitts said...

So Anon, in what industry would a 70% failure rate be acceptable? Medicine? Education? Manufacturing?

Well, that's what we're dealing with when it comes to TSA.

TSA's doing a good job, all right. Just like Brownie did after Katrina.

Earl

Anonymous said...

Please STOP using the memory of 9/11 to justify your agency's existence and its horrid record of success. You are only tarnishing the memory of those lost on that fateful day.

Have some respect and earn yours!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"I am offended by you "Americans," if you can even call yourselves that. TSA has done a great job over the past 10 years. I would love to see any of you get off your couches and do even half the work that TSA has done. What happened to your national pride? Will it take another 9/11 for you to realize how necessary things like TSA are?"

On what do you base your assertion that the TSA has done a great job? Because they say so? Please site some facts to back that up. Since they don't allow independent testing, it's pretty much impossible to tell how effective they are.

My national pride is why I criticize the TSA. They go against the basic ideas this country was founded on.

Anonymous said...

Well anonymous, you stated "They go against the basic ideas this country was founded on."
The 13 states banded together for the common defense, a defense that provides many freedoms, and rights. But those freedoms and rights all do have restrictions to be abided by, by civilized persons.
I read many of the faceless banter, and I hear many new Jane Fonda.

KGH