Friday, July 15, 2011

Known Traveler Passenger Screening Pilot

In the last several months you've heard us talking about applying more risk-based screening procedures to our security checkpoints, based upon the latest intelligence. Well, the time has come and in the Fall, we will begin a passenger screening pilot for a select group of travelers who volunteer more information about themselves. If we can confirm a person's identity and learn a little more about them through information they opt to provide, and then combine that information with our other layers of security, we can strengthen air travel security for all Americans while at the same time speeding up the screening process for those participating in the pilot.

During the first phase of testing, certain frequent fliers and certain members of CBP's Trusted Traveler programs, including members of Global Entry, SENTRI, and NEXUS, who are U.S. citizens will be eligible to participate in this pilot, which could qualify them for expedited screening.

At Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International and Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County airports, certain frequent fliers from Delta Air Lines and certain members of CBP's Trusted Traveler programs who are U.S. citizens and who are also flying on Delta will be eligible to participate in the pilot.

At Miami International and Dallas Fort Worth International airports, certain frequent fliers from American Airlines and certain members of CBP's Trusted Traveler programs who are U.S. citizens and who are also flying on American will be eligible.

TSA plans to expand this pilot to include United Airlines, Southwest, JetBlue, US Airways, Alaska Airlines, and Hawaiian Airlines, as well as additional airports, once operationally ready. If this pilot proves successful, it would help us focus our resources on higher-risk and unknown passengers, while expediting screening for lower-risk and known passengers whenever possible.

Only those passengers who initially agree to "opt in" from those populations will have the opportunity to participate at this time. And of course, passengers are always subject to random, unpredictable screening measures and at no point would participation in this pilot automatically qualify a passenger for permanent expedited screening. 

This will very much be a work in progress. It's important to remember that this is starting off as a pilot program - an effort to validate our ideas on how to move forward. But, if successful it is a substantial shift away from the one size fits all and we think you'll like it. 

TSA Blog Team

If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA. 

87 comments:

Ronnie said...

I will be interested in seeing how this plays out. People I have talked to are split down the middle on this. On the one hand it makes sense to direct our efforts in a more targeted way. On the other hand, it makes about as much sense as taking the word of someone w/ a hip when they alarm the walk-through, ("Oh, its just my hip")and not checking it out. We could be opening up a giant hole and inviting the next bad guy to walk right onto the plane. Good luck with the pilot program!

Anonymous said...

Is there a cost involved to this?

Anonymous said...

Wouldn't genuine "risk-based" screening admit that the liquids policies are based on a nonexistent threat, that no other country wastes its time forcing every passenger to remove their shoes, that your strip-search scanners catch nothing but medical devices, that the only thing that's made air travel safer since 9/11 is hardened cockpit doors, and that we'd be safer with exactly the same screenings we had before then?

Anonymous said...

Here's what TSA should use:

1) Bomb sniffing dogs in airports.
2) Metal detectors w/hand-held wanding if the detectors go off.
3) Patdowns and additional screening for high-risk fliers, (i.e. people with expired VISA's, people who are on terrorist watchlists, etc. This would have caught the 9/11 hijackers.)

It's cheaper and less intrusive than body scan machines. It's more efficient and less intrusive than patdowns for every Joe-citizen who wants to fly. It's better than a trusted traveler program which is going to be ungodly expensive to coordinate and maintain.

Nothing is going to be 100% foolproof, but I think this plan is the way to go.

RB said...

When will TSA comply with the Administrative Procedures Act for all current screening methods?

When will the Known Traveler Passenenger Screening program be open for public comment as required by the Administrative Procedures Act?

RB said...

Another Friday evening dump and hide, eh Bob?

Anonymous said...

Thank you

Anonymous said...

Ya lets just give TSA everything they want

Anonymous said...

Occupation, political alliances, mental health history, spending habits, pretty much everything you've ever done subject to government approval if you want to travel about your own country. It won't happen overnight, but that's where it will end up.

***

There is enormous inertia—a tyranny of the status quo—in private and especially governmental arrangements. Only a crisis—actual or perceived—produces real change. When that crisis occurs, the actions that are taken depend on the ideas that are lying around. That, I believe, is our basic function: to develop alternatives to existing policies, to keep them alive and available until the politically impossible becomes politically inevitable. ~ Milton Friedman

Jim Huggins said...

Bob: what does "expedited screening" mean? What benefits would a passenger expect to receive for participating in this program?

Anonymous said...

Is there a way to opt-out of this bound to be expanded to 'optionally required' program? I would rather not be put in the position of having to trust an agency already rife with crooks and theft with my PII. When you give me full access to everything your PII controls...

Anonymous said...

This will very much be a work in progress.

----------------------------------

Which is PR speak for

"This wasn't planned, but because of all our recent screw ups, we are trying to rush this out."

Randy said...

Bob,

You keep putting "opt in" in quotes and don't exactly define it.

So...I'll ask the silly question:

What would I have to do to "opt in"?

Randy - curious

Anonymous said...

What's interesting here to me is the irony that the passengers in this program will be subject to more stringent screening standards that are TSA employees.

(Yes I'm aware that you have "zero tolerance" for thieves, sexual predators, criminals of all stripes, etc, and that just as soon as they're found with their hands int he cookie jar, you'll "review the incident for potential disciplinary action.)

Anthony said...

This sounds an awful lot like PROFILING.

Earl Pitts said...

@Randy: "What would I have to do to "opt in"?"

Probably more like a "Do you want to fly today?" or "If you don't like it, don't fly" kind of choice.

TSA will likely require a lot of information for a "privilege" we should already be getting by being free citizens in this country. However, given that despite TSA's background checks, numerous Bad Apples® are still found within TSA, so it's just a matter of time until a Bad Apple® is found among the general public who ruins it. Then the "privilege" will be rescinded and they'll have all that PII.

Sorry, I don't trust you guys. I don't trust you to get it right and I don't trust that this isn't a springboard to something more nefarious. Pistole seems bent on doing the things he'd have loved to do in the FBI but was constrained by the law.

BTW - verification word is "gateogre". How appropriate for TSA ...

Earl

Anonymous said...

Now we're talking about real progress. It's a waste of time to process everyone at the gate when pre-planning can save time. Also, federal and state political and government leaders as well as law enforcement personnel are already screened by their respective governmental bodies and should be exempt.

The real threat is mixed up in the group of the average flyer.

Anonymous said...

Will foreigners qualify? Something tells me no. Showing a passport at the security line already makes us specially suspicious.

Anonymous said...

More ineffective security from the TSA.

No background check can ever totally predict future behavior. Not possible.

In addition, even if you opt-in to the program, they can still do whatever they want to you one you get into the security line. You only reduce your chances of being groped.

Anonymous said...

The TSA has destroyed its reputation with a large percentage of Americans. Your organization is now scrambling to address a public relations nightmare that can not be easily addressed without drastic re-engineering a disconnected bureaucratic organization. Your careless implementations and reactive responses have resulted in a well-deserved lack of trust with American passengers. Your lame attempts to address public concern is too little too late.

kellymae81 said...

Anon said:Will foreigners qualify? Something tells me no. Showing a passport at the security line already makes us specially suspicious.

It states in the post that you must be a US citizen. Also, just because you are a "foreigner" (as YOU put it, not me), it does not automatically make us "suspicious". We DONT profile, as the post states..it is unjust and unfair. Nobody gets extra screening just because they are "foreign"!! I know it seems that way because some faiths/cultures require an attire that requires alot of material in wardrobe, that must be pat down bc we cant see the contours of the body. We pat down "Americans" too if they have a long flowing/bulky skirt/dress. Its a procedure, not a "foreigners are suspicious" thing. Hope this clarifies that issue for you.

Anonymous said...

yup..tsa has a lock on bad apples...

http://cbpnet.cbp.dhs.gov/xp/cbpnet/ia/rm/dishonor.xml

nobody constantly bashes CBP

JustSayin said...

This is great news for passengers: reveal a little more info about yourself, get through security a lot faster.

Kinda like getting a Fast Pass at Disneyland!

Of course, just because the TSA's offering this doesn't mean that passengers who reveal more info about themselves are exempt from various layers of unpredictable screening.

Great job, TSA coming up with such innovative ideas to boost both security and efficiency!

Anonymous said...

This is just a way to exempt the elists and the "political class" and their families from screening.
They are as mad as the rest of us are, that their daughters and mothers are being stripped down and felt up.

I'm relatively certain there is NOTHING in this program for the rest of us...

Scott said...

@Anonymous complaining about shoes and liquids.

There are other countries that employ these security procedures, including the removal of shoes. In fact, a lot of countries do this. Go troll somewhere else.

Anonymous said...

TSO says: It states in the post that you must be a US citizen. Also, just because you are a "foreigner" (as YOU put it, not me), it does not automatically make us "suspicious". We DONT profile, as the post states..it is unjust and unfair. Nobody gets extra screening just because they are "foreign"!! I know it seems that way because some faiths/cultures require an attire that requires alot of material in wardrobe, that must be pat down bc we cant see the contours of the body. We pat down "Americans" too if they have a long flowing/bulky skirt/dress. Its a procedure, not a "foreigners are suspicious" thing. Hope this clarifies that issue for you.

My experience says otherwise. First, by disallowing us from an expedited trusted traveler program, you are giving foreigners a less favorable hand. Second, every time a foreign passport is handed to one of your officers, they immediately step their game up. I wear normal western clothing, look European and in no way attract any further attention to myself, but I have been rubbed, poked, prodded and had my belongings rummaged through every single time I step in a US airport for the last 5 years. Most of my acquaintances do not want to travel to the US anymore because of your treatment. It is time to give us (and the fellow Americans too) a little more respect.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"Now we're talking about real progress. It's a waste of time to process everyone at the gate when pre-planning can save time. Also, federal and state political and government leaders as well as law enforcement personnel are already screened by their respective governmental bodies and should be exempt."

Ha - yea, everyone knows that politicians and cops are never corrupt.

If the level of screening done for police officers can't prevent bad cops from getting through how can you expect this program to be 100% effective at catching terrorists?

This program is just for public relations, it actually reduces security.

Chip and Andy said...

This is an interesting idea....

The ability to minimize the possibility of TSA interference in my travels sounds like a good deal. Frequent travelers should be loving this a lot! People with the financial resources to afford it will love it too!

But!

And this is a huge But....

The very concept of this program is more intrusive than even the Nude-O-Scopes.

Lemme 'splain:

I, as a US Citizen, have the right to travel freely about my Country. Nothing in the constitution limits my right to travel, and nothing in the constitution prohibits or in any way limits me from using an airplane to do my travelling. In fact, the Constitution doesn't indicate any method of transport, plane, train, automobile, bicycle, horse and buggy, shoes, nothing. The Right to Travel is guaranteed with no limits on the method.

Now, for the Known Traveler Program, the TSA wants me to offer up how much information and submit to how deep of a background check to 'prove' that I am trustworthy enough to travel freely about my Country. How is this an improvement? How is this in any way increasing security?

This whole idea can best be summed up with that most dangerous of examples... "Your Paper Please."

This is a gross violation of your individual Rights as a Citizen and is nothing more than the lesser evil compared to other evils. It is still wrong, even if it seems less wrong.

Earl Pitts said...

@Scott: There are other countries that employ these security procedures, including the removal of shoes. In fact, a lot of countries do this. Go troll somewhere else.

Please list these countries that do these for flights other than for US bound or flagged flight. US bound or flagged flights are to be screened per TSA standards or they can't enter US airspace. TSA itself has said this.

Now flying in Europe, I never had to remove my shoes, except several years ago when coming back to the US. Didn't have to last two times. Liquids are more relaxed elsewhere.

So again, where are these places? And if they're not doing them, why aren't planes falling out of the sky in those countries?

Please get your facts straight before you tell people to go troll somewhere else.

Earl

RB said...

JustSayin said...
This is great news for passengers: reveal a little more info about yourself, get through security a lot faster.

Kinda like getting a Fast Pass at Disneyland!

Of course, just because the TSA's offering this doesn't mean that passengers who reveal more info about themselves are exempt from various layers of unpredictable screening.

Great job, TSA coming up with such innovative ideas to boost both security and efficiency!

July 17, 2011 9:07 PM

.............
Yes, just great news, a further step into a full blown Police State where permission is required from government to travel.

Problem is Travel is America is an absolute right and government has no authority to limit that travel unless they are willing to arrest and charge the person.

I guess destruction of America is TSA's real goal.

Anonymous said...

it does not automatically make us "suspicious"

-----------------------------------
No, what automatically makes TSA suspicious is a person wanting to get on an airplane.

Anonymous said...

"There are other countries that employ these security procedures, including the removal of shoes. In fact, a lot of countries do this. Go troll somewhere else."

Name the countries that require every passenger to remove their shoes. I'll be waiting.

Ronvoyage said...

My honey and I paid $100 to join the Global Entry program which will be honored by TSA and is good for 5 years. You must complete a long questioner online and have an interview at a major airport. I say two thumbs up for allowing trusted travelers to jet through the long lines.

Anonymous said...

$179 per year buys your dignity and the right not to be molested.

Anonymous said...

It's all just security theater anyway. They've never caught anyone, and they never will, because there is no actual risk. Really. The nation doesn't have to live in fear.

James said...

I'm guessing us foreigners won't qualify as "known travelers", even if we are frequent visitors to the USA.

Anonymous said...

JustSaying said:
"Great job, TSA coming up with such innovative ideas to boost both security and efficiency!"

JS - you forgot to thank the TSA for the great job the TSO did relieving travelers of their pesky iPads and other electronics. I believe he was participating in the TSA's economic stimulus program.

NACI checks? said...

Any reason why anyone who has HSPD-12/CAC wouldnt automatically qualify for this pilot?

Will the check require anything more or less than what is required for a NACI?

Chip and Andy said...

JustSayin said..."Kinda like getting a Fast Pass at Disneyland!"

Wrong again.

First, I agree with your comparison of TSA and Disneyland.

Second, this is nothing like getting a Fast Pass. The only information you give up to get a Fast Pass is a credit card number. To get in the Trusted Traveler Program you have to submit to a back-ground check and give up quite a bit more than "a little information."

And there should be absolutely no reason for me to give up any information in order to travel within my Country. Like I said earlier.... how is this any different than asking "Papers Please!" of Americans.

You give up all the information you want. I'm not giving up any because the Government has no right to ask me just so I can exercise my Constitutional Right to Travel.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"$179 per year buys your dignity and the right not to be molested."

Don't bet on it.

I'm expecting that the screener at the airport will still be able to force anyone they want to go through the full screening.

How about an explanation Bob - can a screener decide that a person in the Trusted Travel program "looks suspicious" and force them to do a full screening?

Jim Huggins said...

You know ... I remember the good old days of the TSA Blog. Back in that era, passengers would ask questions about TSA policies, and any number of TSA employees would jump at the opportunity to answer them.

These days, passengers ask tons of questions (like about this proposed new program), and the response of TSA to these questions is ... silence.

Hard to have a dialog that way.

Anonymous said...

@Jim Huggins

You know ... I remember the good old days of the TSA Blog. Back in that era, passengers would ask questions about TSA policies, and any number of TSA employees would jump at the opportunity to answer them.

These days, passengers ask tons of questions (like about this proposed new program), and the response of TSA to these questions is ... silence.

Hard to have a dialog that way.
-----------------------------------
Well "these days" passengers take shots at TSO's by calling us child molesters, gropers, pedophiles, thieves, and god knows what else. With the exception of the blog team, We don't get paid to post on this blog and I sure as heck aren't gonna spend my free time getting called names like the ones listed above. Most TSO's I know have never even bothered reading the blog because they have heard about the outright abusive language here. God forbid one of your asinine insulting and abusive posts dont get posted, suddenly its the third reich and you are being censored and your right to free speech is being invaded. Truth is, if the blog team cared about the TSO's they would prevent 3/4's of the posts here and maybe this blog would work. What other blog/forum on the Internet can you be so absolutely rude and disgusting toward the admins and their organization and get away with it?

Anonymous said...

We will not post comments that contain vulgar or abusive language; personal attacks of any kind;

Unless of course your a TSO ranting about passengers.....

Robert Johnson said...

Quote from Anonymous: "Well "these days" passengers take shots at TSO's by calling us child molesters, gropers, pedophiles, thieves, and god knows what else. With the exception of the blog team, We don't get paid to post on this blog and I sure as heck aren't gonna spend my free time getting called names like the ones listed above. Most TSO's I know have never even bothered reading the blog because they have heard about the outright abusive language here. God forbid one of your asinine insulting and abusive posts dont get posted, suddenly its the third reich and you are being censored and your right to free speech is being invaded. Truth is, if the blog team cared about the TSO's they would prevent 3/4's of the posts here and maybe this blog would work. What other blog/forum on the Internet can you be so absolutely rude and disgusting toward the admins and their organization and get away with it?"

So you're already trampling on our 4th and 5th amendment rights. Now you want to trample on our 1st?

If you don't like how the public perceives you, then work within the organization to change it. When you - and yes, I mean you personally as even if you don't agree with the policies, you are STILL enforcing them - stop treating people like criminals and terrorist simply because we want to exercise our freedom to travel, people will treat you better and respect you.

Few complained about how they were treated at security before TSA. Planes didn't fall out of the sky then (9/11 was not a screening failure, so don't even go there), and we didn't get all crazy even when the Unabomber was threatening to blow planes up. People were generally treated well and passed thru quickly. It wasn't until TSA came about that people started complaining about security. And those complaints come from an ever increasing clampdown that have done nothing to improve security.

Quit the stupidity and abuse, do your job effectively, and THEN you will be treated better and respected. Until then, expect to be treated as TSA treats the public. Karma sucks, doesn't it?

Robert

Anonymous said...

@ Anonymous
We will not post comments that contain vulgar or abusive language; personal attacks of any kind;

Unless of course your a TSO ranting about passengers.....
-------------------------------
The only abusive or vulgar language is the quotes by people on this blog. I should have specified when i said "passengers" i meant the posters on this blog. i was referring to the person whom i was quoting ("passengers ask lots of questions....". For That, I apologize.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
@Jim Huggins

You know ... I remember the good old days of the TSA Blog. Back in that era, passengers would ask questions about TSA policies, and any number of TSA employees would jump at the opportunity to answer them.

These days, passengers ask tons of questions (like about this proposed new program), and the response of TSA to these questions is ... silence.

Hard to have a dialog that way.
-----------------------------------
Well "these days" passengers take shots at TSO's by calling us child molesters, gropers, pedophiles, thieves, and god knows what else. With the exception of the blog team, We don't get paid to post on this blog and I sure as heck aren't gonna spend my free time getting called names like the ones listed above. Most TSO's I know have never even bothered reading the blog because they have heard about the outright abusive language here. God forbid one of your asinine insulting and abusive posts dont get posted, suddenly its the third reich and you are being censored and your right to free speech is being invaded. Truth is, if the blog team cared about the TSO's they would prevent 3/4's of the posts here and maybe this blog would work. What other blog/forum on the Internet can you be so absolutely rude and disgusting toward the admins and their organization and get away with it?

July 22, 2011 1:59 PM
...................
You know what Anon, there is a little old document that says government cannot infringe on a persons right to free speech. So when the blog team censors a post, even when the language is offending the blog team being members of the government have violated their Oath to Defend the Constitution and that act should result in their being removed from government service.

Censorship on this blog is offending to those who believe in the United States Constitution.

So where do you stand, Censorship and violating the Constitution or Defending the Constitution.

One choice reveals a traitor.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said:
"How about an explanation Bob - can a screener decide that a person in the Trusted Travel program "looks suspicious" and force them to do a full screening?"

And "Trusted" travellers will probably start looking suspicious when TSA needs to fill more hours for its bloated workforce.

kimm said...

JustSayin said..."Kinda like getting a Fast Pass at Disneyland"


Really? Hmm....haven't been to Disneyland, but visit Disney World regularly. I don't have to give my life story to get a fast pass.

Oh, and security at Disney? TSA should take lessons! Non invasive, quick and effective! No bullying, no loss of dignity, no power trip. Amazing! And I don't have to remove my brace and drag my foot through the gate. (Although when some of guards ask me what I did and I tell them, I usually get a bit of a razzing from them....)

Anonymous said...

Robert Johnson: Though I do not agree with a lot of the things the TSA is doing that is more the Politicos in charge making the decisions. Yes, there are some TSO's that get a little power hungry and treat passengers very rudely, but quite a few of them are just trying to do their job and we come stomping into the airport ready for a fight. We should be fighting officials, not your 9 to 5 worker trying to make a decent living. Also they are not obstructing our 5th amendment. The 5th amendment regards our right not to testify against yourself in court. If you're going to say someone is "trampling" your right at least get the right ones.

Anonymous said...

The screening is done backwards.

TSA must wait until the last minute to screen passengers right before boarding. This puts unnecessary pressure on both the passenger and the TSA personnel.

If all commercial air travel required a thirty day prior passenger review the security personnel could match any potential problems against passengers well beforehand and slim the list down to a small percentage of potentially dangerous passengers and concentrate security review on them.

The result would improve efficiency, speed the lines, target security assets on those most requiring it. Everybody (except the terrorists) win.

Chip and Andy said...

Anonymous said..."If all commercial air travel required a thirty day prior passenger review...The result would improve efficiency, speed the lines, target security assets on those most requiring it. Everybody (except the terrorists) win."

Interesting idea.

Two counter-points for your consideration....

First, what about Bereavement travel. Should I tell friends or family to give me 30 days notice before they die?

Second, why should the Government need to check anything before I travel from where I live to some other state? I don't need to tell Uncle Sam that I am traveling to the next state over by Bus or train or car, why should I have to do the same to fly?

As to your backwards statement, I agree. We are accepting greater and greater intrusions into our Constitutional Rights as Citizens just so we can fly and get there quicker. I read somewhere recently (sorry, no link) that less than 40% of Americans have ever been on an airplane. With the (supposed) greater percentage of American's not having to suffer the indignities of the TSA I have to wonder at what point does the illegitimacy of the TSA's Authority become a large enough burden to the People to finally cause the 'uprising' that tips the TSA over and gets them de-funded and removed? The TSA is already trying Bus Stations, and Trains too. When will they cross the appropriate line that causes a large enough uproar from the People and they start listening to us?

Anonymous said...

RB said...
JustSayin said...
This is great news for passengers: reveal a little more info about yourself, get through security a lot faster.

Kinda like getting a Fast Pass at Disneyland!

Of course, just because the TSA's offering this doesn't mean that passengers who reveal more info about themselves are exempt from various layers of unpredictable screening.

Great job, TSA coming up with such innovative ideas to boost both security and efficiency!

July 17, 2011 9:07 PM

.............
Yes, just great news, a further step into a full blown Police State where permission is required from government to travel.

Problem is Travel is America is an absolute right and government has no authority to limit that travel unless they are willing to arrest and charge the person.

I guess destruction of America is TSA's real goal.

July 18, 2011 3:57 PM

----------------------

Because it would be different if the airlines took over the screening and then you could say the corporate airline companies were denying my rights to free travel on airplanes when they deny you service. Even if TSA was eliminated the airline can still say sorry you don't get to use an airplane to express your right to free travel today. Go buy your own airplane and see if the governemnt can stop your right to freely travel then, bet they can't.

Chip and Andy said...

Anonymous said......"Problem is Travel is America is an absolute right and government has no authority to limit that travel unless they are willing to arrest and charge the person...."

To which Anonymous replied..."
Because it would be different if the airlines took over the screening and then you could say the corporate airline companies were denying my rights to free travel on airplanes when they deny you service..."

Huge difference between American Airlines preventing me from traveling on their aircraft and the Government preventing me from traveling using any aircraft.

When I purchase a ticket with an Airlines, I am entering into a contract with that airlines. If that airlines terminates the contract, I am free to do business with a different airlines.

The Government, however, is interceding in that contract. I don't have an option of not using the TSA. I don't have other options for commercial air travel.

The Airlines are regulated by a series of laws, regulations, and free-market forces, and to put it very simply are in business to sell something. If no one is buying what the airlines has o offer, the airlines is no longer in business.

Not so with the Government. The Government is regulated by the Constitution. That particular document, while over 200 years old, sets out very plainly the ground rules for what the Government can and can't do. One of the things the Government CANT do is search me whenever they feel like it. Another thing they can't do.... presume I am guilty until proven innocent.

Besides, the airlines handled security perfectly fine before the TSA stepped in. Aircraft weren't raining out of the skies before the TSA got involved.

Anonymous said...

[[Is there a cost involved to this?]]

Yes. Loss of dignity for one. You are essentially undergoing a security clearance investigation ... something I've done periodically for over thirty years, since I've been in the military and worked as a contractor to same. Yes: I work for an outfit that has *actual* security, which is one of the reasons I know that TSA policies are window dressing.

About the only thing that I see missing from this program is a knock on the door of every acquaintence you've had for the last decade by a suit wearing reflective sunglasses asking if you'd ever kicked their cat.

Additionally, it's another in a long line of incremental dilutions of the Constitution. The Constitution is, at this point, a largely irrelevant document which the government only follows when it feels like it. "Chip&Andy" has adequately described this particular issue.

And for all those self-pitying TSA folks here whining about the descriptions being used on them: if you don't like how you're described, then don't do those thangs which would make it accurate. It ain't name-calling when it's true.

Robert Johnson said...

So Bob, is there a reason why my post in response to Anon wasn't posted? There wasn't anything in there that violated the ToS.

Robert

Anonymous said...

chip and andy wrote:
"When I purchase a ticket with an Airlines, I am entering into a contract with that airlines. If that airlines terminates the contract, I am free to do business with a different airlines."

you are also entering a contract that states that you will have to be screened before being able to get on that plane and use that ticket.

Anonymous said...

[[you are also entering a contract that states that you will have to be screened before being able to get on that plane and use that ticket.]]

And WHY does this contract state that?

Because the government requires it to be there.

You can either play the contract law game in which case you need to keep the government out of it, or you can play the government bossiness game in which case you render everything else meaningless.

Mixing and matching to suit your purposes is dishonest.

Anonymous said...

[[Bob, is there a reason why my post in response to Anon wasn't posted? There wasn't anything in there that violated the ToS.]]

Is there any reason that it takes two days for comments to even make it to the board in the first place? Moderating a message board isn't rocket science, guys; it doesn't take a genius. Most boards even have it automated.

Scan for naughty words, and either disqualify the comment or replace it with some kind of placeholder.

There's no excuse - except 1stAM-defying censorship - that every comment must be read by the staff, then undoubtedly debated by same, and finally posted when the staff comes back from break and actually feels like doing it.

Leave it to TSA to find the most convoluted, awkward, feeble and inept manner of doing even the simplest of tasks.

Furthermore, why can I not get my comments posted under my google login, or my openid, or my name/url posted, but the backup I send anonymously does?

Anonymous said...

I'm waiting to see an entry made about the program at Logan that started Aug 2 [it's been in the news for almost a week now] where TSA is going to try to use Israeli-style security screening. The program in a nutshell, "behavioral assessment" agents are going to engage a passenger in idle banter, and those who display the body language of someone who is Up To Something will be asked to step aside for further screening, while those who don't will be let on their merry way.

What I'm most curious about is how this site is going to spin the various categorical denunciations it has given Israeli policies in the past. Such as
1] It can't work in the US because we have hundreds of TSA-controlled airports and Israel only has one; and
2] TSA will not profile because it "doesn't make good security sense."

Yes, TSA, people have been paying attention and remember what has gone before. Your agents who attempt to initiate idle chit-chat today after spending ten years informing your public that they are guilty of terrorism until they prove themselves innocent may just be very very impolite to your overtures. I feel obliged to remind you that chewing out your agent is not suspicious activity.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I'm waiting to see an entry made about the program at Logan that started Aug 2 [it's been in the news for almost a week now] where TSA is going to try to use Israeli-style security screening. The program in a nutshell, "behavioral assessment" agents are going to engage a passenger in idle banter, and those who display the body language of someone who is Up To Something will be asked to step aside for further screening, while those who don't will be let on their merry way.

I've been waiting for this a s well. Another pretend security program. If they have a way to separate guilty from innocent with a few second conversation I think a lot police officers would like to know how they do it.

What will they do with people who don't speak English or people who are mentally handicapped and have problems holding a normal conversation? Do they get full screening every time? That will be popular.

Anonymous said...

anon said:
"Yes, TSA, people have been paying attention and remember what has gone before. Your agents who attempt to initiate idle chit-chat today after spending ten years informing your public that they are guilty of terrorism until they prove themselves innocent may just be very very impolite to your overtures. I feel obliged to remind you that chewing out your agent is not suspicious activity."

well it seems like the tsa and the bloggers on here have something in common, the tsa treats people guilty until proven innocent just like the bloggers that treat tsa as guilty until proven innocent. horrah everyone finally has something in common!!!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said:
"you are also entering a contract that states that you will have to be screened before being able to get on that plane and use that ticket."

I just looked all over the ticket I purchased and can find nothing of the sort. Want to try again?

Anonymous said...

Bob - I work for an IAC and have already been through the STA process, in addition to beign a frequent flier with those airlines. Will having an STA also be considered equivalent to CBP's Trusted Traveler programs?

Anonymous said...

This is a great step forward! Eliminate those US Citizens who are not a threat and focus more energy on unknowns who will have a higher risk profile. It will lessen the total cost to the US economy by reducing the delays to US citizens who are known to not be a risk, and increase the overall effectiveness of the TSA efforts.

Anonymous said...

I experienced the "Israeli style" security at Logan Terminal A, DL, CO, AS, this past week and it was ridiculous. Where do you live? How did you get to the airport? How long are you going for? What do you do? And on and on and on. More security theatre. I must have passed as I was allowed to move to the screening checkpoint. In terms of experience, I work for an airline (non-flying staff), I have passed a TSA Security Threat Assessment (STA) background check, and am a private pilot. Yes the TSA should spend extra time on me, I am an obvious threat to civil aviation.

Joe said...

That is a great article and great news. Anything to save time in the airports for frequent travelers is good. Also reducing the anxiety of the screening process is good.

The first question that comes to mind is what information is the TSA asking for voluntarily? There is no explanation of what information has to be provided.

Great article though.

robfwtx said...

I'm ready for this program. I'm so sick of having to fly every other week and deal with taking shoes off, pulling belts off, unloading laptops, emptying pockets, and then trying to get through screening. I lost a full container of the only deodorant I've found to date that doesn't break me out to the 3oz rule... it was 4 and hadn't been used. The agent at Love didn't take it but the one in Denver did. Her comment was you can get smaller containers. Well, I can tell you they don't make a smaller container of what I use. Enough of this mess. I'll submit to a background check just to be left alone. It's stressful enough having to travel for work.

Paul said...

Has everyone forgotten why these sercurity procedures are needed in the first place. If there were not any in place, who would you moaners and groaners blame?

Soiboy said...

Opt me in! if this will save me having to wait behind some person who never flies emptying their keys/purse/man bag/figuring out how to put their shoes in/figuring out how to walk and chew gum while dozens of people wait and wait behind them, OPT ME IN!! PLEASE! profile me, do whatever you need, collect DNA, invade my privacy, just get me out of the moron line at the airport!

Anonymous said...

Have you considered exemptions for individuals cleared by other govt agencies, such as DoD employees (to include active duty military), State Dept, etc.? This would exclude another group of 'trusted travelers' and allow more focused security screening efforts.

Anonymous said...

As a member of Global Entry I welcome this when it comes to the routes I fly the most.

ravichopra said...

I've apparently been enrolled in this program for Delta and experienced it first hand in Detroit yesterday. It is FANTASTIC. No disrobing, no pulling out liquids or your laptop, no x-rays - just throw your bags on the belt and walk through the metal detector. I've been traveling weekly for the last 10 years and having them finally recognize that this puts me in a pretty low risk group is comforting.f

Anonymous said...

Does anyone know if I get accepted to the pilot trusted traveler program does that apply for international flights or do I still have to sign up for GLobal Entry

Blogger Bob said...

Anonymous said...Does anyone know if I get accepted to the pilot trusted traveler program does that apply for international flights or do I still have to sign up for Global Entry
October 18, 2011 11:31 AM
--------------------
You will still have to sign up for Global Entry for international flights.

Thanks,

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

Dr. J Dallas said...

It looks like more government scams to me designed to take away freedom to protect us from imaginary bad guys.

Ashley said...

i think that this is a great idea because its another way of ensuring that are we are all safe in this country!

liftmaster said...

TSA must wait until the last minute to screen passengers right before boarding. This puts unnecessary pressure on both the passenger and the TSA personnel.

If all commercial air travel required a thirty day prior passenger review the security personnel could match any potential problems against passengers well beforehand and slim the list down to a small percentage of potentially dangerous passengers and concentrate security review on them.

gafas01 said...

Interestingly this method proposed by the government, but to confirm the identity of a person only with the information you provide is a risky not?, The only benefit is to avoid routine and late revisions always performed

Sophia Marie said...

These both sound like great projects but I really wish you would bring them to TPA! We are a growing International airport. If you do bring it to TPA I would love to sign-up for the pilot program. As international referees, 3 members of my family are often flying from TPA either domestically or internationally practically every month of the year.
FLCricket

Anonymous said...

I for one am for it. I am on a plane 2-3 days a week every year and am tired of the TSA treatment. I have given my prints and iris scan for my job but am subjected to radiation several times a week by full body scans. I worry about what TSA is doing to my health.

Danny said...

What's the latest status of the project?

TomP said...

I see one poster reckons that TSA will never catch anyone because there's no risk because the bad guys will never travel by normal means.
What cloud has he come from? Just look at the shoe-bomber as just one example from many.
The TSA must keep on keeping on - the need is there; all that they must do is keep their humanity about all they do.

online jobs at home said...

I should be fascinated by seeing how this plays out. Individuals I have chatted with are part down the center on this. On the one hand it attempts sense to control our ventures in a more targeted method. Also, it makes about the same amount sense as taking the statements of someone w/ a hip when they alert the stroll-through, ("Oh, its simply my hip")and not looking at it. We might be opening up a titan hole and welcoming the following disagreeable fellow to stroll right onto the plane. Good fortunes with the test case project!

Gil said...

Seems a little unfair and also scary for people because I always think tight security is much better and safer than lax. I remember arriving from a trip before, when we got our packages, no one even checked if we took the right ones. Now what if someone else took our luggage. That's definitely not good security-wise.

Anonymous said...

This program appears to be invitation-only at this time. Are there plans for regular travelers to be allowed to join? I do a lot of PHL-SFO routes to visit family.

BobQ said...

This is why I prefer to travel by car. Can we please make it more difficult or uncomfortable to fly? I'm being sarcastic.

Bobby said...

Yes lets just give TSA everything they want.