Thursday, November 11, 2010

New TSA Pat-down Procedures

As we’ve discussed before, TSA’s screening procedures change regularly based on the latest intelligence. Pat-downs have long been one of the many security measures TSA and virtually every other nation has used in its risk-based approach to help detect hidden and dangerous items such as explosives like the one we saw in the failed terrorist attack last Christmas Day.

Pat-downs are primarily used to resolve alarms that occur at a walk-through metal detector, if an anomaly is detected during screening with advanced imaging technology (AIT), or during random screening. If one of those situations arises, you will be given a pat-down before you're able to continue on to your flight.

Pat-downs are also given to passengers who opt out of screening by AIT or walk-through metal detectors.

There’s nothing punitive about it - it just makes good security sense.  And the weapons and other dangerous and prohibited items we’ve found during pat downs speak to this.

It’s worth mentioning that only a small percentage of passengers end up needing a pat-down.  The best way to be prepared at the checkpoint is to remove everything from your pockets prior to screening. Also, if you have a hidden medical device, you may want to bring it to the officer’s attention before screening. We’ll be better able to help expedite your screening that way...

A few other points to keep in mind:

* Pat-downs are conducted by same gender officers
* All passengers have the right to request private screening at any point during the screening process
* Anyone has the right to have a traveling companion present during screening in the private screening area.

Blogger Bob 
TSA Blog Team

505 comments:

«Oldest   ‹Older   401 – 505 of 505
Anonymous said...

You say that the FDA has certified the safety of the new machines. Fine - just check on how many drugs and medical devices that he FDA has introduced as safe and subsequently has ordered withdrawn from the market ( a notable case is Vioxx - caused some 100,000 xs deaths ). Does this fill you with confidence re their competence.

Eric Jones said...

Flying is neither a right nor a privilege. It's a service provided by private companies in exchange for money. It's something we as supposedly free citizens of the US have the freedom to do - to contract with private companies for services. That freedom is being eroded in the name of security by government bureaucrats whose vision for America is to provide maximum security regardless of the cost to our freedoms, and that constitutional protections, like the 4th Amendment, clearly don't apply if it means someone might get hurt.

Anonymous said...

So on the topic of the pat down location; we may ask for a private screening, so may we similarly ask for a screening to be done in public if we would not feel safe in a private screening?

Anonymous said...

Bob, I posted this nine days ago:

--------------

How about this, let's make it simple. Bob, yes or no:

Do the new procedures including the touching of the genitals, through the clothing, with the palm of the hand?

Just answer the question.

-------------

All comments are moderated, and my comment was not outlandish or emotional in any way. I think it deserves a response. While it is clear what the procedures include, I have seen no TSA official willing to be quoted as saying that the TSA will touch genitals. If your procedures include that, and you are defending your procedures, then what is wrong with answering a simple question? If you are afraid to say it, then you shouldn't be free to do it.

So answer the question.

Anonymous said...

The American public is giving up civil rights through "administrative policies."

To make our decisions even more difficult, TSA's policies are a moving target - constantly shifting.

The constitution clearly states that we have the right against unreasonable search & seizure.

Under Terry v. Ohio 392 U.S. 1 (1968), law enforcement officers are permitted to conduct a limited warrantless search on a level of suspicion less than probable cause under certain circumstances. In Terry, the Supreme Court ruled that when a police officer witnesses "unusual conduct" that leads that officer to reasonably believe "that criminal activity may be afoot", that the suspicious person has a weapon and that the person is presently dangerous to the officer or others, the officer may conduct a "pat-down search" (or "frisk") to determine whether the person is carrying a weapon. To conduct a frisk, officers must be able to point to specific and articulatory facts which, taken together with rational inferences from those facts, reasonably warrant their actions. A vague hunch will not do. Such a search must be temporary and questioning must be limited to the purpose of the stop (i.e., officers who stop a person because they have reasonable suspicion to believe that the person was driving a stolen car, cannot, after confirming that it is not stolen, compel the person to answer questions about anything else, such as the possession of contraband).

In Katz v. United States, 389 U.S. 347 (1967), the Supreme Court ruled that a search occurs only when 1) a person expects privacy in the thing searched and 2) society believes that expectation is reasonable.

To fine someone $11,000 who "opts out" of the invasive groping search, is ludicrous.

It has been extensively reported that the new X-ray machines cannot see "inside" someone, so now terrorist will secrete their weapons vaginally or anally.

What's next a complete proctological or gynecological exam??

Anonymous said...

Did you not notice how TSA is now refraining from calling the devices full body scanners? Now they are "Advanced Imaging Technology". That just sounds a lot less threatening now, doesn't it? The book 1984 warns against this type information distortion. I'm not saying that's the type of world we're heading towards. However, I AM saying that it's an obvious effort by the TSA to lull the public into complacency concerning their new policies. Enough is enough. A recent study using fake bombs found that airport security outsourced to private companies detected about 80% of "bombs", while TSA detected only 25%. 25%! TSA needs to go.

Anonymous said...

Done flying until this is ended. No need to call any politician who wont listen anyways. Voice your opinion with your money...it's a strong voice.

Wayne said...

Bob,
If you want some credibility, please explain this search.
Source: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40291856/ns/travel-news/

On Nov. 7, Sawyer said he went through the security scanner at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. “Evidently the scanner picked up on my urostomy bag, because I was chosen for a pat-down procedure.”
Due to his medical condition, Sawyer asked to be screened in private. “One officer looked at another, rolled his eyes and said that they really didn’t have any place to take me,” said Sawyer. “After I said again that I’d like privacy, they took me to an office.”
Sawyer wears pants two sizes too large in order to accommodate the medical equipment he wears. He’d taken off his belt to go through the scanner and once in the office with security personnel, his pants fell down around his ankles. “I had to ask twice if it was OK to pull up my shorts,” said Sawyer, “And every time I tried to tell them about my medical condition, they said they didn’t need to know about that.”
“One agent watched as the other used his flat hand to go slowly down my chest. I tried to warn him that he would hit the bag and break the seal on my bag, but he ignored me. Sure enough, the seal was broken and urine started dribbling down my shirt and my leg and into my pants.”
The security officer finished the pat-down, tested the gloves for any trace of explosives and then, Sawyer said, “He told me I could go. They never apologized. They never offered to help. They acted like they hadn’t seen what happened. But I know they saw it because I had a wet mark.”

Looks to me like there's a lot more to the story than you're reporting. Sawyer was repeatedly denied a private room, and TSA agents glossed over medical issue / equipment. At the end of the day, we all want to travel safe. But TSA has an obligation to both the safety AND dignity of travelling passengers.

Wayne said...

The commentary that the FDA says AIT is safe is only half the story. The TSA has also said that the images cannot be saved and are not being saved. However there are 2 law suits filed where the plaintiffs have proof of the images being saved. This, of course, is a total invasion of privacy and contrary to what our TSA organization says.
Bob - Would you care to elaborate?

Wayne said...

One observation is that a large number of posters feel the need to post under "anonymous" vs using their real names. Their comments and concerns seem quite valid, but it would appear they are afraid of reprisals. That is a pretty strong statement in itself about where TSA policy and approach have gone. This is my third post with my name, and none of them have been posted.

joe, PhD ME, MBA said...

One criminal had explosive in their shoe and TSA wants to inspect the shoes of the population of the world. One criminal had explosives in their underwear and TSA wants to see beneath the clothes of the world population. Is this sensible? Will TSA want to inspect body cavities of the world population after one criminal realizes that this option is still available to them?

Progressively invasive searching procedures that TSA implements as reactions to criminal innovations will never be adequate. This is easily proved with two questions. Is it possible for a criminal to bring aboard explosives or more than 3oz of gel materials inside their body? Yes. Is it possible to inspect the insides of all the passengers bodies? No.

Therefore, a new approach is necessary and the first step is to abandon the ludicrous idea that all passengers must be treated the same. A system must be developed; of screening based on the use of information technology combined with education of TSA personnel to identify risky individuals, of using varying security measures that are appropriate based on the risk associated with each of those individuals, and of allowing the rest of us honest, law-abiding, hard-working Americans to go about our business with minimal intrusion on privacy and schedules. It has to be like this. Look at the Israeli system which has already arrived at this solution after a much longer operating history than that of the US TSA. Do we really need to wait until a (hopefully would-be) bomber uses their body cavity(ies) to arrive at the conclusion that the current strategy is not going to work? Why do we have to go through this learning process when the final solution is so obvious?

Anonymous said...

I'd like to ask the California lawyer a question in response to:

"When a person buys an airline ticket in the United States the buyer (knowing or not) is giving IMPLIED CONSENT to have TSA screen their person/property."

Why are medical doctors, dentists, etc therefore able to be sued if a surgery goes wrong? The patients all signed an informed consent prior to the procedure. They "know" what the possible adverse outcomes are after consenting, right? So why can they still be sued if something goes wrong? The patient elected to have the procedure after all. What is the difference to us 'consenting' to a reasonable search only to find out that it wasn't at all reasonable? I am a dentist and if I can get sued for spelling out each and every potential complication prior to a procedure, why can't the federal government be sued for burying a 'implied consent' in the fine print of a flight voucher??? THIS is disgusting. I'm actually losing pride in America for the first time in my life.

justmyopinion said...

Question... This will be the third time I have asked this question. Please just answer the question. If I go through the AIT and an anomoly is discovered and I have to go through the enhanced pat down does TSA pat down the entire body or just the area of the body that has the anomoly? If the entire body receives the pat down I feel this is not only a waste of time for TSA and the person involved but seems rather stupid. If the AIT is so good TSA should be able to pinpoint the area/item of concern and reconcile the suspected problem very quickly. I have an implanted medical device that I'm sure will show up on the AIT and cause me to be referred for a pat down. Again, just answer the question. Is that too much to ask of you people.

justmyopinion said...

How is a passenger's personal property secured while they received a AIT scan and possible pat down? From my experience a passenger is not able to maintain visual contact with his/her personal property during scan and/or pat down.

Anonymous said...

Why does Orlando...the capital of tourism in this country, have no full body scanners???? EVERYOne gets the pat down? ridiculous!!!!

Will Carver said...

This is just great. I'm a freshman in college, and I'm not too thrilled about flying home tomorrow...

I also enjoy how Bob has replied to ONE total comment in this entire comment section, and in that case, he didn't even really help at all, he just stated "email me with more information and I will look into it".

As a first year college student, I decided to be smart. I have read up on all the procedures as described by other people (obviously, "Bob" was no help here, he didn't even state officially what the new pat down was going to entail) and I will be paying great attention to what happens tomorrow when I fly home.

If I am sent to a section to be patted down AFTER going through the scanner, and it wasn't because they "saw something", I will complain. If I am groped in any way, I will complain. If I feel uncomfortable and am still forced to go through with a certain procedure, I will complain.

Mainly, what I am trying to say here is I'm a 19 year old student who is trying to be probably one of the few people of my age group to say this is enough, and that I, though young, still am very in touch with my rights and my personal dignity.

Get your act together TSA, or the dismantlement of your enterprise will be swift and forthcoming.

Anonymous said...

A quick question - are you allowed to request the gender of the person doing your pat down?

For example, if a man traveling were more comfortable being felt up by a woman would that be okay? What about transgendered people? Could a transgendered person request another transgendered person for the pat down?

Anonymous said...

All of this requires that we trust the TSA. At this point I feel that the agency has gone beyond its authority in this pat-down policy and should be reined in. We still have our rights.

Anonymous said...

After 40 years of working with one of America's largest statistical measurement systems as well as a Sigma 3 oriented quality control process I recognize that your system is ultimately based on PLACE IN LINE

That leaves 90% of the probable terrorists free to board planes and blow them up.

You really gotta' fix that problem.

I'd suggest you get some REAL statisticians with REAL WORLD experience on the job, and that they team up with some SIGMA 3 experts to figure out what can be done.

It'll definitely be more effective than the primitive system you now use. It'll also be more comprehensive and far less intrusive.

BTW, I make my way through your system IN TOTAL SILENCE.

It's best that way. I don't want to know you. You don't want to know me. And it totally distracts your agents from doing their jobs.

You probably never noticed that.

Again, another problem you need to tend to eh!

Sommer Gentry said...

What is happening with patdowns at the gates? Are people who have already passed the checkpoint subject to another enhanced patdown? What if someone at a gate requires a private area for his/her patdown - do they have to walk all the way back to the checkpoint to find a private room?

Anonymous said...

I went thru a security clearance and currently have a biometric Clear Card what will I subjected to and is it worth even having this card anymore?

John Reece said...

I have questions about the policy:

Will TSA personnel who touch children's genitals be charged with sexual abuse of a child and be required to forever after register as a sex offender?

Will homosexual passengers have the right to request an opposite sex TSA agent to do the enhanced pat-down?

Will heterosexual TSA personnel have the right to refuse to perform an enhanced pat down on a homosexual passenger? Will passengers be required to reveal their sexual preference so as to give TSA personnel the opportunity to exercise this right?

Will passengers of any sexual preference be entitled to know the sexual preference of the TSA agent about to touch their genitals?

Anonymous said...

I can't wait until somebody raises the issue that dangerous things can be smuggled in a persons stomach or rectum at which point you will do what exactly TSA? Cavity searches. Perhaps colonoscopies. Oh I know, shots of syrup of ipecac for all travelers.

Jennie said...

Bob, you mentioned that pat downs are random but are generally conducted from a metal detector going off. I have NEVER set off a detector and have, in the past year, been patted down three times. Each time, the new scanners were either not yet installed or they just weren't using them that particular day.

Anonymous said...

Is it possible to choose an opposite sex screener? I would feel more comfortable with that. I can't get an answer anywhere. If my 4th Amendment rights are going to be violated, I'd at least like to have some choice about it.

Anonymous said...

They are not necessary and the body scanners are an invasion of privacy and unconstitutional. Not all airports use the US procedures just look at Israels procedures:
http://www.examiner.com/populist-in-national/exactly-what-are-israeli-airport-security-measures-and-would-they-work-here

Will they work here? We should attempt to implement them on a smaller scale to see how they work. But should American citizens who have been here for multiple generations be subjected to this type of security? Why not build a list based off of background checks from both the person, family and friends? Someway of speeding up the security process to screen those that are most likely vs those that are less likely?

Eric said...

Think back to the reason why these security measures were put in place. I don't think anybody wants to see that happen again. This is only to keep us safe during travel and to prevent disaster. These procedures are a necessity and the media turns this into a frenzy because it is good press. My opinion is the majority of the people are OK with this and the minority aren't. It goes back to an unhappy customer will tell 9 people and a satisfied customer will tell 3. This is being blown out of proportion. TSA is keeping us safe and there are certain sacrifices we need to make due to the war on terror.

Anonymous said...

Sorry Bob, the 4th amendment says you can't do what you do. Unless you have probable cause don't touch my junk.
"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

Vrace Lobo said...

Anonymous said...
Bob,

Is what the Massachusetts ACLU saying regarding the pat downs true?

Women in tight skirts that don't allow an agent to feel the thigh area may be asked to remove the skirt in a private screening area and will be given a gown or towel to put on.

November 11, 2010 8:34 AM

((((((IT IS TRUE))))))

Grace lobo said...

joe, PhD ME, MBA said...
One criminal had explosive in their shoe and TSA wants to inspect the shoes of the population of the world. One criminal had explosives in their underwear and TSA wants to see beneath the clothes of the world population. Is this sensible? Will TSA want to inspect body cavities of the world population after one criminal realizes that this option is still available to them?

Progressively invasive searching procedures that TSA implements as reactions to criminal innovations will never be adequate. This is easily proved with two questions. Is it possible for a criminal to bring aboard explosives or more than 3oz of gel materials inside their body? Yes. Is it possible to inspect the insides of all the passengers bodies? No.

Therefore, a new approach is necessary and the first step is to abandon the ludicrous idea that all passengers must be treated the same. A system must be developed; of screening based on the use of information technology combined with education of TSA personnel to identify risky individuals, of using varying security measures that are appropriate based on the risk associated with each of those individuals, and of allowing the rest of us honest, law-abiding, hard-working Americans to go about our business with minimal intrusion on privacy and schedules. It has to be like this. Look at the Israeli system which has already arrived at this solution after a much longer operating history than that of the US TSA. Do we really need to wait until a (hopefully would-be) bomber uses their body cavity(ies) to arrive at the conclusion that the current strategy is not going to work? Why do we have to go through this learning process when the final solution is so obvious?

November 21, 2010 11:59 AM

(((Joe you make excellent points, however , the TSA, will need to be restructured to do all this....all the way from the management down...perhaps our military men and woman who return , get trained by the Israeli military and take over our nations airports............I would should feel safer having them protect us, then by some simple civil servant who get 1 week of training by people who are not capable of certifying themselves.....

Anonymous said...

No one wants this but its the world we live in and we must be safe. The problem is, exactly what its been...management are politicians and the doers that offend us in the airport arent. They rarely have the patience and presence of mind to deal with the public. In their defence the public is chanllenging...however i have seen countless events where this statement is true...the TSA is where lack of intelligence and authority meets...its a dangerous thing. Thats the problem and with all the scrunity the screw ups are going to be noticed by the press. End of story.

Mike said...

The TSA does not limit pat downs to an alarm incident so why do you tell readers that you do? Clearly the TSA lacks skill and has done no research into other countries with long histories of handling air travel security. These countries do NOT abuse law abiding persons who pose no threat. Why can't the TSA design such processes here? As for me air travel is done. I will not submit to felony assault by the TSA.

sophiakarjohn said...

TSA is keeping our country safe would we rather be safe our sorry... and if we cut back on TSA procedures and if another terriost attack happens then people will ask where was TSA... please let TSA do the job flying is a privilege and if you have a problem with the new procedure don't fly the end... thank you TSA for keeping our country

Anonymous said...

TSA is keeping our country safe let them do their job we want to be safe think about the safety of the American people and not yourselves...

Monte said...

Trying to intimidate travelers who aren't even in the screening line? Like Luke Tait? You know, when your agents followed him to his flight gate with walki-talkies because he filmed TSO's searching a DANGEROUS 6-year old?

Acting like a gang of knuckle-dragging thugs is not going to get people off your back.

I was looking at a picture of the nineteen 9/11 terrorists today. None of them looked like nuns, or three-year old girls, or professional women with prosthetic breasts, or retired special education teachers with ostomy bags.

What is wrong with you?

Monte said...

OK, want to know how terrorists can avoid the booty-scanner every time?
Just place a couple of confederates in line in front of you and have them "opt out" of the scan. The GROPE line is only one person deep, so this will tie them up for at least 10 minutes... and you will waltz right through without a pat-down.

Of course, the terrorists are TOO STUPID to have thought of this...

Anonymous said...

The threat of terrorism has been alleviated with these scans - only to be replaced with a completely different style of terrorism forced on the American population.

Summer said...

What does the TSA plan to do when a woman who has been sexually abused or assaulted refuses to go through the xray due to health concerns (don't even those techs xraying patients wear protective gear) and then can't abide a pat-down if a person gropes them? You have a law suit coming. While you do have the right to search someone suspicious, how do you justify someone who isn't suspicious and just trying to get someplace? Are you really going to potentially re-traumatize a victim who has the right to not have their body touched by a stranger?

Anonymous said...

Why are law abiding citizens presumed guilty until proven innocent? I, for one, will not fly if my only options are to submit to the scanner or to a humiliating pat down search. Remember that I am not the enemy here, and there are much less invasive measures that can be used to guard the safety of the flying public while protecting us from unlawful search and seizure. What happened to the 4th Amendment here? Did not know that TSA was granted the authority to trample on the Bill of Rights.

Anonymous said...

TSA must go.
Long live our U.S. Constitution.
We must not submit to unlawful search and seizure.
We must not submit to harmful or invasive security procedures.
We must not submit to having our testicles squeezed or our breasts or butt groped.
We deserve respect and dignity.
Choose not to fly until TSA stands down.
Vote with your wallets and purses, people.
TSA must go.

Anonymous said...

"If you object to these measures, don't subject yourself to them! It's a free country and you have every right to find an alternate means of travel." To the anonymous above, you do realize you are no longer enjoying a "free" country because TSA agents have clearly stated that when you buy a ticket you are giving up your rights. So enjoy your period of flight in a non-free atmosphere at the same time claiming you enjoy freedom.

Anonymous said...

Maybe the time has come to ask my Congressmen to cut funding for TSA. It's an inefficient organization led by inept politicians.

TSA = the new FEMA

Anonymous said...

These security measures are frequently defended with the claims that ‘terrorists said…’ such and such, or that the ‘Security Professionals now believe that Al Quida plans to…’ Of course these conversations and plans can’t be vetted by the public, we have to take them on faith. The same faith we were asked to use when this same Security Professionals told us there were WMDs in Iraq.

Think back over similar ‘crises’ like the no liquids on board policy. Those who objected to the policy excess were first labeled clueless about the direct attack threat, then media coverage of issues with the policy were characterized as outliers, eventually some modest adjustments were made to mitigate the primary issues in media coverage. Eventually the ill-advised policy was ended. As usual, months to years later GAO report no liquids policy was found to have been flawed, ineffective and held as an example of how not to address a situation, but nothing changes. Liquids are on board now planes, though in limited quantities.

There are two ways for terrorists to act in this struggle over security. One is by direct attack; the second by attrition and interdiction that comes with the added cost on the target of protecting itself. These costs are measured in both economically and culturally terms. Put simply, what are you willing to pay in cash, time, inconvenience, dignity, liberty to protect against the risk of a direct attack?

What if the terrorist goal to increase the cost of protection and not to mount a direct attack? The terrorist win as the Government implements a security policy and drives citizens to comply with it at the expense of cash, time, inconvenience, dignity and liberty.

Homeland Security Department actions and the TSA in particular have histories of excess and inept implementation of policy objectives. Despite the fact that HSD and TSA has low trust capital with the American Public, they still seek to drive over the public with poorly explained and poorly implemented security measures that alienate the very people they are supposed to protect. And they do it at the beginning of peak travel period instead of off-peak where people could get use to it.

Perhaps they are right and these measures as distasteful as they are, are the only rational choices, but track record makes this hard to believe.

If you don’t buy the security arguments above, ask yourself this: How could a Government Agency that deals with the public and has been through multiple policy implementation gaffs still be so tone deaf or clueless about how to handle the public? If they don’t know how learn to handle the public, how can we believe that they are learning how to handle the terrorists threat?

Bart said...

These new procedures make me more reluctant to fly than after September 11th.

Time to rethink these egregious, intrusive, ineffective, humiliating, and quite possibly illegal procedures.

Anonymous said...

Why can't a person request the TSA officer to wash their hands or use sanitation wipes or gels and place new gloves on in the full view of the person being searched? They do this in doctors' offices for good reason. It helps prevent the spread of bacteria- sexually transmitted diseases etc. from migrating form one person to another. If a person is wearing a low cut jean, and the officer places their hands down the waist band to just the length of their fingers, it puts their fingers square in the middle of the pubic area. Having a clean change of gloves can go a long way to achieving acceptance. When I asked they simply said nothing but put your are out and started the pat down. I know they heard me as well - the officer was two foot in front of me looking directly when I made the request.

Anonymous said...

The TSA's lack of regard for the U.S. Constitution should be enough for their services to be eliminated and replaced by an entity that has the intelligence to understand what constitutes effective security measures. TSA falls flat on it's face in it's failure to provide meaningful security to the pubic and the employees of the airports and the airlines.

Anonymous said...

1. Are TSA agents required to change their gloves between passengers?

2. If not what illnesses can be transmitted from one traveler to the next via screeners' gloves?

3. What should people who are allergic to latex do to avoid an allergic reaction during a pat down?

4. If the gloves are not changed between people, what are the options for people with medical conditions to avoid exposure to other people's germs?

5. If TSA agents are not required to change gloves between travelers are they required to do that upon a passenger's request?

6. Have the agents been educated that storing gloves in their pockets contaminates the gloves?

Anonymous said...

I wonder about all the diseases that are transmitted from person to person via the TSA latex gloves that are NOT changed between each pat down passenger.

I expect the CDC has some guidelines on this.

Monte said...

I was actually beginning to feel a little compassion from TSA until Mr. Pistole's "DIG IN HIS HEELS" memo today (November 23). His true colors have reappeared.

We've all been Pistole Whipped again.

Anonymous said...

So as an American, in a supposedly free country where I have the right against unreasonable searches, my only two options if I have to fly anywhere are being irradiated (btw, I've a risk of cancer already in my family thank you very much, and you want to increase my chances?) and having my naked pic shown to some guy in a booth or getting groped in an inappropriately sexual way by someone other than my husband. In the name of "protection", huh? I won't be flying anywhere because I refuse to submit to such tyrannical measures. TSA, you've overstepped your bounds by a long way now. Metal detectors are fine, but this? Not at all. This is an unacceptable invasion of privacy and you should be ashamed of yourselves for subjecting law-abiding US citizens to this violation.

Anonymous said...

I was heading through security to my flight when I was asked to go through the evasive body scanner. I complied and after the scan was completed, the agent conducting it was smirking to a co- worker about something they had seen ( I assumed it was my figure) the same agent pulled me aside and asked me to take my shirt of in the line. Apparently I was concealing something under my breasts. I refused to do this publicly and he took me to a private room. I then procceeded to remove my top. He then insisted that he needed to slip his fingers underneigh my bra to further this search. Once more I complied. After this humiliation, I was to endure another injustice. The agent began a pat down though I was only under suspicion of hiding something in my bra. He eventually had his hands, palm down, inside my waistband. Later my buttocks and vagina were being more or less rubbed down. At this point I had voiced my concern and he said that I could not stop the search once it had begun. I passed the screening and had to hold back tears as I walked away from security all the while hearing the agent jeer about me to his co- worker. This is America. I am an American. I deserve to be treated as one.

Israeli who knows what he is talking about said...

No patdowns can replace lack of common sense. The underwear bomber had no return ticket and no luggage, was previously on a no-fly list and came from a hostile country. How many more danger flag does a passanger need to raise for TSA to stop him/her?

You are being reactive to each steps the terorist take, and as such you stay behind the curve. They put explosives in underwear - you deploy genitals pat downs. They put powder in ink cartridges - you inspect ink cartridges shipments. News flash - they can put explosives in ANYTHING. They are laughing at as every day that is passing by. Again, there is no alternative to common sense, and its been a while since I saw a TSA rep demonstrating any.

Wayne said...

Dear TSA,
This latest BLOG entry dated November 11, 2010, has generated 452 comments. Among them are at least 15 recurring legitimate questions. When does someone at the TSA plan on answering these questions? I ddin't find any of the questions offensive, and I don't believe they will impact national security. Please answer the questions. I beleive it would go a long way towards resolving some of the problems.

Anonymous said...

As a social worker and psychotherapist with an expertise in trauma and who treats patients who have been sexually abused I must say that I have grave concerns about the mental health impact of these revealing scanners and "enhanced" pat downs. These new procedures represent a significantly harmful trigger to those who have been sexually abused.

These women and men may experience strong reactions to the new procedures such as dissociation, reliving past sexual abuse, and intense feeling of guilt, violation and shame. Long term results of this exposure may be an increased risk for eating disorders, depression and suicide as well as other mental health complications. At least one in three women have been sexually abused at some point in time in their life. These triggers are likely to affect a large percentage of the American people, as well as those visiting our nation.

Anonymous said...

I feel that these new procedures are a violation of our constitutional rights as outlined in the 4th amendment. Furthermore, I have my doubts about how much safer these procedures actually make us. Like the prohibition of liquids and the removal of shoes I think these new procedures represent a "safety theater" meant to make us feel more safe but without significant actual increases in safety. With this in mind I wonder if the harms that are potentially caused by these procedures are worth the modest increases of safety we feel. When combined with potential health affects from radiation and the violation of trust in the TSA after their statements about the confidential nature of these arguments proved to be false*, I would say that they are not worth the harm.

*The TSA has stated that the images produced by the full body scanners are not saved despite the fact that in several separate known occasions hundreds of photos of images were saved and taken by TSA agents for "personal use". The TSA has also said that features of the face are concealed to protect privacy and cannot be viewed but this is not true as many images containing facial features have turned up. In relation to "enhanced pat downs" despite the claim that passengers are patted down by only same gender TSA agents there are numerous examples of men doing enhanced pat downs of women including feeling private areas and vice versa. Also reports have come out of passengers being taunted or humiliated by TSA agents including one college aged woman who had her shirt pulled down by a TSA agent, revealing her bare breasts to everyone in line. When she returned to collect her things after walking away and crying male TSA agents made mocking comments to her including "I wish I would have seen you come through the first time. Oh well, I guess I'll just have to watch the tape."

Anonymous said...

All of my government representatives will be contacted repeatedly until the problem of invasion on American's freedoms introduced by the TSA's recent policies has been fixed.

Anonymous said...

This is just wrong!
used to resolve alarms that occur at a walk-through metal detector
Because I have a metal plate in my leg, as I metioned to the TSA agent, I set off the metal detector at SEA on Wednesday. So I'm subjected to a man sticking his hands in my pants to check for explosives because the metal detector cant detect explosive. That make not absolutely sense. I wasnt even wonded and nothing was resolved. "Only a small percentage"? Doesnt matter if you're a disable-american when you now face this every time you fly. Absolutely outrageous! I have absolutely no respect for the TSA anymore

Anonymous said...

I strongly object to the current TSA “enhanced pat-down” procedure for the following reasons:
1. TSA has intentionally and purposely required this search procedure to come into direct contact with an individual’s private parts. It cannot be over-emphasized how wrong and inappropriate this decision is.
2. TSA should stop calling this by the warm and fuzzy connotation, “enhanced pat-down.” We are not being patted down. We are being felt up, including private parts, and this increases security of passengers only incrementally compared to the earlier procedure.
3. TSA is very insensitive to passengers’ rights and feelings. TSA states that it wants co-operation from passengers, but did TSA allow passenger input before its decision to go ahead with the new, invasive body searches? How can TSA expect our willing co-operation when TSA made the decision unilaterally, and left us with the unattractive choice of either allowing groping of private parts or not flying?
4. I am a frequent flier 70 years old and a life-long natural citizen of the U.S. I have an artificial hip and therefore always set off the metal detector. Am I to expect that a TSA agent will touch my private parts every time I fly from now on, when the airport doesn’t have a scanner? I have undergone reasonable “pat-downs” in the past, but was not prepared for the current invasive body search done in Austin on Nov. 4. Why weren’t we warned by the TSA ahead of time what the new body searches would entail? The agent sure did not warn me. When I objected to the body search, the Austin TSA supervisor forced me to undergo a more punitive search or not fly. John Pistole discounts the body searches as being done on only a small fraction of passengers. How would you like to be one of this "small fraction" body searched every time because of your artificial joint?
5. TSA says the new body searches are “needed for security.” I question the logic on that! If what TSA says is true, then why isn’t TSA inspecting body cavities and doing body searches for children under 12? Terrorists can plant bombs in body cavities and on children, so we are still at risk by TSA’s logic if they (primarily for political reasons) don’t extend searches to cover these possibilities. Also by TSA logic, body searches of all people, including young children should be extended to train stations, subways, shopping malls, etc. where there is just as much chance of a terrorist bomb and killings as in airports and planes. In summary the logic is flawed and driven as much by political reasons as security reasons.
6. We all know that risk cannot be eliminated entirely. There needs to be balance between security measures and the respect to a citizen’s constitutional right to privacy and dignity. TSA has egregiously gone way beyond this balance with current invasive body searches. TSA should do everything practical, including profiling passengers ahead of the flight (as Israel does) to reduce risk, while at the same time treating passengers as human beings instead of criminals. Many of us, including myself, are willing to live with an incremental increase in risk in order to preserve our privacy and dignity against obtrusive searches. I can live with the scanner, but please just stop the current body searches immediately.

Anonymous said...

look @ all these crybaby!! Americans!! how pathetic!! if there not terrorists then it shouldn't be a problem! Because if they have nothing to hide it shouldn't be a problem for national security sake!! plus if it was so demeaning they could just have a male for male the scanner and a female scanning females with a male scan line and a female scan line problem solved no pervs just business

Anonymous said...

I hope that there are some of you who work at airports on this blog. The TSA's problem is that they have no plan!! they just react to whatever happens and then think up a quick way to do something about it with total disregard to the rights of people. one way to protest is to simply not fly and cancel your reservations. once you pressure the airlines they will in turn squeeze the TSA. This last thought was posed at one of our veterans meetings: What are the TSA people going to do when terrorist begin to hide things inside their body cavities? REMEMBER THE TSA ONLY REACTS, IT DOES NOT PLAN!!!!

Anonymous said...

What about those who have been sexually assaulted or raped? The pat downs and AIT devices both could be traumatizing experiences for these people. It also wouldn't matter if the TSA patting them down was the same gender or not considering their attacker could have been of the same sex.

Coming from someone who has been sexually assaulted, I am very ashamed of what this has come to. Not to mention, I fly frequently for work and have no choice in the matter. Something has to be done about this.

Anonymous said...

I am lucky not to have to travel too often. Having read these posts, all I can think about is how the federal government has given a union the power to control, manipulate and (if they want to) completely halt the travel of the public. There are several posts about the "freedom to choose alternative forms of transportation," and I agree to some extent with that argument. We are free to choose. However, when the federal government allows a unionized company to assert control and authority to mistreat anyone I have a huge problem with it. I also have a huge problem with the potential for my wife or my three daughters to have a stranger (man or woman) touch them in intimate areas. Call me a radical conservative, but I doubt President Obama doesn't have to worry about his wife or daughters going through this type of "scan" or groping process.
-Scared for the future.

Anonymous said...

I'm appalled.

So I have to choose between having a stranger stare at my naked body, or having a stranger essentially grope me?

I was raped a few years ago and the thought of a stranger putting her hands on me unnecessarily makes me want to panic. As a result of the rape, I have an eating disorder that I'm struggling to recover from. Having a complete stranger see me naked without my consent would not only humiliate me in ways I can't even explain, but also cause me to feel extremely violated. I can't believe that I actually have to consider never flying again because of these blatantly unconstitutional policies...

These people aren't medical professionals. They may not be professional at all about touching me or seeing me naked. I don't doubt that there is at least one sicko out there who really gets off on all of this.

Anonymous said...

Wear a speedo and get refused to board. Here is a video of such a case at Sky Harbor:

http://wewontfly.com/every-time-pat-down

Anonymous said...

Can someone please explain in detail the new TSA patdown procedures? How come the TSA does not post just how exactly screeners command the process? I can't find anywhere on the internet the exact process the TSA is required to do when performing a pat down.

Anonymous said...

Dear TSA,

My wife is a victim of sexual abuse. It is simply unreal that in America, for her to fly she has to endure all over again experience of having someone inappropriately touch her.

It has made me so furious, that I've refused to fly commercially since these rules were instituted (a little side note to those that don't know -- if you have the money to take a private plane there is ZERO screening).

For a nation that rightly cherished its freedom I'm embarrassed by having TSA act the way that they do.

Personally, I'd rather have a 0.0001% of dieing on a flight without these invasive searches than have a 0.0000000001% chance of dieing on a flight with them.

Anonymous said...

You seem quite hesitant to disclose the actual details of the pat-downs...and, how do you know that the scanners are safe? so...traveling, here are my options:Get exposed to radiation that we do not know the effects of, or get sexually assaulted and humiliated, and yes, it would be sexual assault if you were not government. I have heard stories about people being searched by different gender people also. I really do not, want to get touched there by a stranger. And the "dangerous" items probably include little bottles of lotion and other such deadly objects.....

Anonymous said...

An Austin TX man was taken to court by TSA and convicted for saying he did not want to be searched. He did not refuse to be searched or act in any way that would prevent the search. Evidently freedom of speech is added to the list of rights TSA can abolish for its own purposes. This is an example of punitive behavior coming from TSA's policies on pat-downs -- people are criminals just for not liking the idea?!

Anonymous said...

On Friday January the 28th 2011 @ Salt Lake City airport I was chosen for "special" screening. I was going to meet up with my nieces who had flown as unaccompanied minors at the respective gate.
The officer touched my penis with the back of his hand in a very uncomfortable way. (It was very slow paced.)
Never was I offered to be scanned initially. (Never had the chance to say "yes" or "no" to it.)

This was incredibly disgusting.

Sarina said...

You know what..if it's keeping me safe then I don't have a problem. I've never had a problem with the scans or the pat downs, and I see a lot of people addressing the problem, but can you come up with solutions to the problem?

No one is satisfied anymore. People complain about the scans because they are "explicit" but then complain about the pat downs because they are "violating". Pick one, swallow your pride, and move on. That's just my opinion.

John said...

THE TERRORISTS HAVE WON; THEY HAVE OUR GOVERNMENT DOING THEIR DIRTY WORK ON US

Anonymous said...

What prevents the TSA from electing to do a complete body cavity search on a six year old if they desire? Throw her in jail for refusal? Out of control agency that appears to be accountable to no one.

Anonymous said...

Former Governor Jesse Ventura is suing the TSA for the illegal and unconstitutional groping.

http://www.infowars.com/ventura-strikes-back-with-lawsuit-against-tsa/

Anonymous said...

MEOW:3

Anonymous said...

"And the weapons and other dangerous and prohibited items we’ve found during pat downs speak to this."...We have yet to hear about anything that TSA has found or any terrorists threats they have prevented. Please enlighten the American public on your reasons for these patdowns. The same American public that you say you protect and pay your salaries.

Anonymous said...

Also you can request the TSA agent remove and replace, in your view a fresh pair of gloves. If he is patting you down or going through your bag. We have no idea what the gloves have been in contact prior to your search.

Anonymous said...

Here is my solution to the problem. As a frequent user of the airlines I became fed up with the procedures and attitude of TSA personel. I did not fly via the airlines for one year. During that time period I learned to fly and now rent a light plane for long trips within the US and Canada. More fun, less frustrating and relaxing. Try it!

Anonymous said...

Sikhs, if selected for additional screening, have the right to ask to pat-down their own turbans
and have their hands swabbed for chemical residue, instead of allowing a Transportation
Security Officer (“TSO”) to pat-down their turbans.

Why can't we do a pat-down of ourelves?

Anonymous said...

I am a 63 year old grandmother with an artificial hip and and artificial knee. Small airports have to AIT machines, so every time I fly I am subjected to the "enhanced patdowns." No one has a right to touch my breasts and feel up my crotch. To call this procedure "respectful" is ludicrous. You have to stop! Every time I go through this "security" I cry.

Anonymous said...

One comment, i fail to understand why they require a full body pat down when the naked scanners clearly show them their area of concern. If my scar on my shoulder sets off their naked scanner alarm then i am fine showing them that scar (because of it's location) but i am not okay with allowing them to violate the rest of my body because of it. The fact that i had surgery doesn't give them the write to molest me.

It is grossly inappropriate, makes no senses, and the policy should be changed. I for one will not allow them to touch me with their hands; that's a privileged given to my wife, my doctor, an officer with probable cause or a court order, and no one else.

They claim these measures make people safer but anyone that travels a lot knows that the claim is frivolous. There is no reason why they have to touch your genital areas at all with their hands. They could use the old wands or thinner plastic devises that they would feel resistance with if anything were to be detected. If they feel that strongly that someone is a concern they should get an officer to touch you and provide a report that states their probable cause for the further invasive and intrusive measures.

TSA OFFICERS need to earn their respect with the public and these measures are counter productive to that cause. I don't believe they offer me any greater safety on a plane and that's is just scary. I'm happy to know as with each other incident that the passengers and public will be vigilant and actually be the ones to detect something going wrong.... by the way TSA, don't take credit for the Christmas day bomber, YOU FAILED TO DETECT IT and your machines wouldn't detect it now! The public is not stupid.

I only hope someone from the TSA actually reads these and takes some of the suggestions as well as the public outrage seriously. My fear is that like any government agency they don't care and are simply drones.

Anonymous said...

thanks to the TSA, more and more people are deciding to take more non-evil forms of transportation and/or staying home. just because flying is faster means nothing when your humanity and dignity is being stripped from you in front of your own children. seriously people. the video of the family being searched and the looks on those children's faces while being surgically humiliated in front of the whole world means that this is a purposeful conditioning process. understand your rights and say no such tyranny

Mayor said...

DID YOU KNOW: At the turn of the century Circa 1900, people believed that uranium was good for them. Many folks made jewelry, dinnerwear, lotions, creams, drinks, and even food out of Uranium. Even young scientist kits (for children) contained uranium in it. Point being, we believed that Uranium was good because of the power it contained. I forgot one... They made Uranium Condoms as contraceptives. It was advertised to give men more power down there. Now we know that nothing good comes from Uranium. In fact it gave a lot of people cancer. You will not find marketed items containing uranium now and days because science has determined that it is unhealthy due to its half-life and the release of significant amounts of radiation. So, for OSHA to say that these scanners are safe is not good enough for me. You wonder why for simple x-rays the dentists put lead plated bibs over your chest and groin and the technitian stans behind a lead plated wall. I am not satisfied, nor should anyone else be satisfied with these machines launching radiation into the air. How often are the TSA agents monitered for radiation exposure? I'm sure they aren't.

Anonymous said...

I have a medical device that requires a bypass. Nearly 100% of the flights I've been on,the TSA has treated me very rudely, and acted very suspicious when I show them my medical device ID cards which have been issued by the company for these types of events. A few TSA employees have been professional,and this has been in smaller airports,it's obvious the morale of your employees is very low.
Also,in a country increasing out about homosexuality, the same gender pat downs make zero sense to me. If it would be refined to same gender and straight sexual orientation,the requirement for the pat down to be done by the same gender might make sense. Otherwise,it doesn't make that much sense

Anonymous said...

I WILL NEVER FLY AGAIN!!! If enough people stop flying maybe they will stop the molestation of passengers!!

Anonymous said...

i had a disagreeable experience just this past July 4th weekend at LAX. i told the screening agent i wanted to opt out of the AIT screening and use the metal detector (including the pat-down) as described on the TSA site http://www.tsa.gov/approach/tech/ait/faqs.shtm

yet i was told that i could NOT opt out and MUST go through the backscatter unit.

i know the entire screening process is supposed to somewhat randomised to keep terrorists guessing. but to either blatantly LIE on about the policy or have such poorly trained TSA agents? i'm not sure which is worse.

Anonymous said...

i wonder which would be more fiscally efficient:

a) continue to fund the TSA as it continues to expand and wedge itself further into the process

or

b) have one, trained, armed marshal on each and every flight.

open debate on whether they should be ingognito or not.

Anonymous said...

Bob,

has anyone pointed out some of the flaws in the original post yet?

pat-downs are NOT conducted by same gender officers. sure, they TRY to. but there is NO guarantee.

Anonymous said...

I haven't seen an answer about those of us who don't consider ourselves male OR female. What about those of us who present as a gender different than our sex (as in, presenting as a woman, but have male genitalia), but would feel more comfortable with an officer of their SEX touching them?

I suppose I shouldn't even ask, though, since this sort of thing seems to be up to the discretion of the team in the airport you fly from.

Anonymous said...

I don't fear the terrorists, I fear the TSA.

Anonymous said...

Any issue, like this one, which mixes concerns about constitutional rights with public safety will forever be "a floating decimal point."

Anonymous said...

I am a 15 year old girl and I am flying to LAX tomorrow. I am worried that I will have to have a humiliating pat down tommorow. This is not fair. I am a child.

Anonymous said...

I am a 15 year old girl and I am flying to LAX tomorrow. I am worried that I will have to have a humiliating pat down tommorow. This is not fair. I am a child.

Anonymous said...

I experienced a humiliating and degrading invasive "pat down" coming through SFO airport yesterday. I refused to go through the "naked scanner" and instead got in a line for a normal scanner. I was then told that I could not go through the normal scanner, but now had to do a pat down. At one point, the agent told me to lift up my shirt and she ran her hands along my waistband and pulled my jeans open to the point where she could visually see my undergarments. During the leg pat down, I stopped the agent after the first time she brushed her hands along my genitals and protested the search vehmently. This led to a private room and another agent then witnessing a second pat down (the agent said she had to "start over") during which she again ran her hands along my genitals a second time. At this point, I was in tears, refused to be fondled further, and again stopped the pat down and demanded a supervisor. The supervisor told me I had to complete the search or not get on a plane. The agent conducting the search told me I needed to spread my legs further, I refused again and she said if I didn't spread my legs, it would be more invasive. So, I did... and she ran her hands along my genitals for a THIRD time. I was extremely vocal about my objections to the pat down procedure and the supervisor told me to write to my congressman, and I left the room in tears. I literally felt as if I had been sexually violated. Where do I go to file a formal complaint? This has got to stop.

Blogger Bob said...

Please use Talk to TSA.

Through Talk to TSA, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at SFO.

Thank You,

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

George said...

While traveling in China and South Korea recently I was pat-down by female sreeners in both Seoul and Beijing. I am a male and found this to be highly offensive. I complained to the female lead-agent in Beijing telling her this was offensive to Western Culture norms as pat-downs are done only by same sex in civilized nations. She stated in China pat-downs of females are only done by females but males can be pat-down by male or females. Treating men like farm animals is shameful and disrespectful. If China and Korea really want to get into the First World they need to respect the sensibilities of Ladies AND Gentlemen. Otherwise train their Male screeners to also be professional, non-sexist, "dedicated only to Security" (like female screeners are apparently regarded)so they too can pat-down women and thereby enhance the Security function. Nothing sexist there...right?

Anonymous said...

I wonder how they would feel if all the people they "pat-down" would also get to pat them down?

Anonymous said...

I am tired of being patted down(whey do they call it a pat down when it is a rub down?) every time I fly out of GSP.

I have a metal hip replacement and GSP airport does not have a full body scanner and I always set off the walk through metal detector. Since they do not use the hand held metal detector- they must do a full body "pat down". In the past whey they used the hand held wand, they would just need to pat down that area. Now they must do a full body pat down because I set off the walk through. Why are the hand held detector not used anymore? This technology should be used if it is available.
I don't mind going through the body scanner- but if an airport does not have this piece of equipment, then use the hand held and only "pat down" the area that sets off alarm. Why do they need to do my whole body?

Anonymous said...

I'd been thinking it would be great to allow my 17-year-old daughter fly alone to visit her grandparents. None of us have flown in years. But then I read about the pat-down procedures. Even if only a "small percentage" are subjected to this indecency (and is that ever right?), she could be one of them. She is a sensitive young woman who is likely to find this procedure to be traumatic. To say that I am dismayed is an understatement!

Anonymous said...

I was double molested by TSA last Thursday in OKC. Hundreds of people were in line for security missing flights while half the TSA staff milled around doing nothing. Although they had 3 lanes - they were merging two lanes to force them both thru the new AIT machine. I opted out (as is my right) and all hell broke loose. I was harassed by every TSA agent for opting out. I opt out all over the country and it has not been an issue before. Maybe b/c OKC just got the new machines. I'm tired of being treated like a criminal - guilty until proven innocent. I'm traveling for work and don't have a choice. I have a metal plate and screws in my neck. I have excessive scar tissue. I have a body piercing and a patch located under my bra delivering medication. All of these items are flags for the machine. Let's do something proactive to keep America safe. Looking at old ladies and kids naked, exposing us to radiation isn't working.

Anonymous said...

Does anyone remember 9-11? I read a lot of complaints written on this blog and virtually NO solutions or suggestions. Many like to complain and I think those who are complaining in this blog without having solutions or answers would be the first to blame the Government and TSA for not doing enough if a terrorist (or anyone for that matter)got a bomb on their plane or a loved one's plane and blew it up. I'd rather have my daughter go through a pat-down search and know that she is safe on a plane rather than wonder if she's going to end up on a hijacked plane or on a plane with someone who was able to smuggle a gun or knife onboard. I'll do what I have to do and go through what I have to go through to ensure my families safety and I believe the safety of all passengers is first priority. It's not about me, it's not about you, it's about keeping the airplane in the air and ALL on it safe. This mentality that it can't happen to me, won't happen to me, or that it can't happen in America is naive. Unfortunately this is the world we live in and compromises have to made, it's not perfect, but it's all we have right now to ensure our safety.

Anonymous said...

I would feel more comfortable with whole body imaging machines if I knew exactly how much of my personal privacy I am giving up. That is to say, can security officers see my bra, my underwear in these machines? It's disgustingly dehumanizing.

Anonymous said...

It’s worth mentioning that only a small percentage of passengers end up needing a pat-down."

At National Airport in Washington, not only did I warrant a pat down after walking through AIT, but I didn't even have any jewelry on, and I had nothing in my pockets.

Seems to me that TSA officials at that airport are just conducting pat-downs as regular policy. That is incredibly dehumanizing. The most stressful part about flying is being harassed by power-tripping TSA officers.

Anonymous said...

The damage done by XRays (any amount) accumulates in the body and causes cancer. Nobody that flys on a regular basis should be subject to XRays. It is a very expensive health hazard. People who opt out for this reason should NOT be subject to a RUB DOWN. A RUB DOWN is not a pat down. A pat down is where the body is patted and the hands are lifted off the body between brief contact. A rub down is where the hand is rubbed across the body in continued contact. A metal detector does not direct xrays at the body. It uses magnetism to detect the presence of metal. I would easily choose to go through a metal detector. I always refuse to go through any kind of xray machine. Stop punishing me for protecting myself and defend my right to not be subjected to unreasonable search and seizure. Do the job correctly or quit. I am not a criminal.

Ellis Steinbeck said...

Bob,

please post this.....

We need to know what our rights are. There was a former TSA agent who was charged and convicted for battery for demonstrating (to a lesser degree) what was done to her moments before on a TSA supervisor. Wouldn't a common understanding of what the boundaries of the pat down are eliminate incidents like this and create more of a sense of amity between passengers and the TSA?

What secret could be divulged to the bad guys for understanding the law and protecting ourselves from undue search and seizure...the Constitution does make clear that we have a right to know what undue search and siezure is.

Anonymous said...

I have 2 artificial hips and have documented ID/photo cards from the surgeons giving all the information about the joints that set off the scanners.
nevertheless 100% of the time i am subjected to groping round my groin, buttocks and breasts, because apparently 100% of people in my position also lie and have other concealed weapons. Why not pat down/screen the same % of people with metal joints and accompanying documentation as you do the rest of there public? This is ADA discrimination and serves no useful purpose whatsoever.Who would try to smuggle concealed metal weapons thru' security if they already knew they would be stopped because of their metal joints? When will the TSA use some common sense and decency? There is NO justification for assuming that people with documented metal joints are 100% likely to be concealing metal weapons also. It's so ridiculous it's laughable. I wear flat thin soled shoes, leggins and a sleeveless t-shirt when going thru' security-where exactly am i supposed to be concealing all these dangerous weapons ??? Why do you assume TSA employees are more honorable than the general public-it seems like the perfect cover to me.

«Oldest ‹Older   401 – 505 of 505   Newer› Newest»