Thursday, November 11, 2010

New TSA Pat-down Procedures

As we’ve discussed before, TSA’s screening procedures change regularly based on the latest intelligence. Pat-downs have long been one of the many security measures TSA and virtually every other nation has used in its risk-based approach to help detect hidden and dangerous items such as explosives like the one we saw in the failed terrorist attack last Christmas Day.

Pat-downs are primarily used to resolve alarms that occur at a walk-through metal detector, if an anomaly is detected during screening with advanced imaging technology (AIT), or during random screening. If one of those situations arises, you will be given a pat-down before you're able to continue on to your flight.

Pat-downs are also given to passengers who opt out of screening by AIT or walk-through metal detectors.

There’s nothing punitive about it - it just makes good security sense.  And the weapons and other dangerous and prohibited items we’ve found during pat downs speak to this.

It’s worth mentioning that only a small percentage of passengers end up needing a pat-down.  The best way to be prepared at the checkpoint is to remove everything from your pockets prior to screening. Also, if you have a hidden medical device, you may want to bring it to the officer’s attention before screening. We’ll be better able to help expedite your screening that way...

A few other points to keep in mind:

* Pat-downs are conducted by same gender officers
* All passengers have the right to request private screening at any point during the screening process
* Anyone has the right to have a traveling companion present during screening in the private screening area.

Blogger Bob 
TSA Blog Team

505 comments:

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Anonymous said...

I have a defibulator and must have a pat down. I also have a government security clearance for my job. You would think there would be a way to not have to have a pat down every time. I have not been through these new procedures, but I am extremely concerned.

MikeB said...

I've spent my entire professional life working for the government--either in the USAF or in law enforcement. It's clear that the TSA has gone way beyond what's acceptable to travelers. It's also clear that the "enhanced pat-down" procedure is wholly punitive in nature, something that's inflicted on those who opt out of the virtual electronic strip search to ensure that those who do not wish to subject themselves to the body imagers to coerce compliance.

The TSA appears to be power-mad and wholly out of control. There are far better ways to achieve the agency's legitimate objectives than subjecting citizens to intrusive and embarrassing searches.

Anonymous said...

I have been searching everywhere concerning the TSA pat down procedure and I am unable to find anything that mentions the security officer is required to touch the passenger's penis.

Anonymous said...

I would like a difinitive answer on whether or not muslim women get to not only say no to going thru the naked scanners but ALSO get to decline the pat down and perform one on themselves about the head and neck?!?!...I mean really...if this turns out to be true...no one and I mean no one will ever go thru screening again!

Anonymous said...

I was in LAX last week and experienced the new x-ray screening. It was my first time and I was completely at unprepared and at shock with the new procedure. Nobody with TSA made an announcement in the line about this new procedure they just forced me through and not knowing I couldn't have ANYTHING including my non-metal wallet in my pockets or a belt and watch that I always wear through security with no problem...I ended up having to put all of my belongings into about 8 different bins making me very uncomfortable. Then I was told to stand with my hands up...not knowing what the heck was going on. And when I said I felt uncomfortable with all of this, I was subjected to extra screening where I got a very thorough pat-down.

TSA you need to inform the public of these actions and new screening requirements so we know what to expect. This was a public information FAIL.

kate said...

The new search procedures remind me of when I worked in a state correctional facility, everyone went through a pat down before entering the facility. I would advise you to teach your agents not to get down on their knees when patting down, for their own safety. When it comes to our safety, I don't think you can do enough to ensure it, there are so many ways a person can hide things, they even go as far as inserting objects in the body cavity, in their hair, thier belts,you just can't imagine and even with a pat down,you won't find everything. If a person objects, then they don't fly, simple as that.

kate said...

I forgot to mention, in the prison system, pat downs are being done by
officers of a different gender, it's not convenient to wait for it to be done by someone of the same gender.

Anonymous said...

This is simply ignorant on the part of the government. They are not only stripping us literally but stripping our freedoms away as well. Don't get me wrong, I want to travel safely, but what we need to do is PROFILE! I will never travel again by plane until our system is revamped. U.S. citizens are being treated like criminals.
-----------------------------

How lovely. So you object to being treated like a criminal, and your solution is to only treat brown-skinned travelers as criminals. Did it ever strike you that they might also be citizens? Is your concern for freedom or merely for the freedom of citizens that look like you?

Keep in mind that the odds of a young Arab male and an 80 year old white grandmother launching an attack are roughly equal-- both present virtually no risk. If an Arab male is a greater threat to aviation, the difference is statistically insignificant.

Anonymous said...

Constructive Criticism: Publish you SOPs for the new procedures online, include them with the boarding pass instructions and poster them where the pat down is taking place. This way, passengers should know what to expect and standards will need to be upheld or it can be immediately pointed out that they are beyond their SOPs.

Another suggestion is to include TSO's ID number on the boarding passes of those they inspect so that appropriate personal, professional and disciplinary accountability is taken.

Anonymous said...

If we can do background checks for buying guns, why can't we do appropriate background checks and use a Transportation Worker Identification Card (TWIC) card or similar biometric card to serve as an appropriate form of identification? That card can then be scanned with pin number or password to appropriately identify passengers who would serve no risk to the rest of the flying public or airline employees. Have these folks go through a traditional metal detector and scan their carry on baggage as is already time consuming enough. TSA should look into allowing frequent travelers to pay for the TWIC card option. As for background check, if it is good enough to purchase a gun, why cannot the same check be sufficient enough to serve for the TSA?

Pontius Pilate said...

This is a violation of privacy if there ever was one. I only hope that more people who hold our civil liberties dear oppose the TSA in their unreasonable search procedures.

Anonymous said...

What I want to know is why an LEO told a person who may have an incendiary to go back to the screening area.

Anonymous said...

I'd like some confirmation that my belongings won't be out of my line of sight during any screening procedures. The enhanced digital screening and patdowns both seem like they would eliminate my ability to watch my own bags--which not only leaves me vulnerable to theft, it seems to run counter to the adage/warning to always make sure my bags are in my possession.

What steps has the TSA taken to make sure I can see my belongings during the entire screening process?

Anonymous said...

I just read (and saw video) that now TSA are actually touching people genitals during "pat down" procedures. To me that is the same as saying - bad guys won. So these bad guys made you to loose all freedoms - slowly but surely. It does not matter that these are same sex people who touching you - they might just like that anyway. How do I know that? How is it that is somebody touches my private parts at street that is harassment, but if it is done at airport - that is security? And don't tell me that I have a choice of radiation instead - I'll never take that as an option... It is just so creepy...

Anonymous said...

Has anyone suggested/considered employing medical professionals to perform the groin and breast exams?

Anonymous said...

What are the penalties if I choose not to go through the full body screen and do not agree to have my genitals touched? My presumption would be that an alternative method would be found to clear me for air travel. The worse possible outcome being that I would not be able to fly and returned to the public area of the terminal. I am hearing reports of interrogations, threats of arrest, inability to leave of own volition, threats of civil action and fines, and general abuse of law biding private citizens. What does the law say and where can I find it?

Anonymous said...

Do the TSA employees go through a background investigation at the Federal, State, and Local level to ensure that we do not have sexual predators screening passengers?

Anonymous said...

They are subjecting the Airline Pilots to this enhanced screening on a DAILY basis, I can choose not to fly (which I do) but the pilots have little choice if they wish to keep their jobs. The pilots are already at the controls of the airplane and have access to tools that could be used on weapons onboard. Stop this abuse of Pilots and thank them for the job they do!

Anonymous said...

I know this doesn't apply to TSA but what happens when terror threats transcend into our daily life, perhaps, shopping malls, office buildings, buses, trains, etc.. Who will make us safe in these places? Will we all be subject to this type of scrutiny everyday we go to work., perhaps drive over a bridge... When will it stop.? this is just the beginning of a police state. The terrorists have indeed won i'm afraid. Our bodies are not only being stripped searched, our rights are being stripped searched!!

Anonymous said...

Welcome to 1984. It just happened a few years late. I'll never fly again. I hope this cripples the travel industry.

dina said...

Please clarify the pat-down procedures. On Nov. 14, at the Sacremento airport, I was subjected to a pat-down because I was WEARING A SKIRT.

As a frequent business traveler, I visit many airports in America, often in this particular skirt (denim broomstick style) because it's a comfortable option for flights.

NEVER before have I been singled out because of this or any other skirt.

Yes, the TSA rep specifically said, we'll need to pat you down because of your skirt.

Has anyone else ever experienced this?

Anonymous said...

TSA is useless and needs to be abolished.

Anonymous said...

Your description of the pat-downs is extremely troublesome, especially your "other points". Not only adults but also children are subejected to this procedure.

Your first point was:

* Pat-downs are conducted by same gender officers

Why is this relevant, unless it is to remove the appearance of a sexula assault? And if so, is the officer also guaranteed not to be same sex oriented? We teach our children to be careful of inappropriate touching by adults of both genders, not just the opposite one. Given the recent reports about the TSA, this is not reassuring in the slightest.

Your third point, clarifying your second point, was:

* Anyone has the right to have a traveling companion present during screening in the private screening area.

What about people traveling alone? What about children or moinors traveling alone? Are they assigned some random fellow passenger if they would like a travelling companion present?

Overall, the choice between allowing my child to be touched on the genitals or irradiated with ionizing radiation is not acceptable, even if the genital toucher is the same gender as the child. Does anyone read the news anymore? Why should I feel comfortable with my five-year-old son being touched on the genitals by a strange male or a strange female? Are these people even screened for psychological issues?

I just can't in good conscience fly with my children any more. I guess that's the best way to avoid airline terror -- never use the airlines!

Anonymous said...

Enough

Anonymous said...

I am a law abiding citizen who works for the government. These "enhanced pat downs" are nothing more than a tool to force people into the virtual strip search machines. I don't care if you cover my face, you are violating my privacy. And how does this apply to kids?!?! This is terrible policy.

Anonymous said...

I can't believe that anyone who has seen the example photos of the AIT scan would actually go through with it. How is it the least bit acceptable for a perfect stranger to see every bit of my genitals and breasts? And what is my guarantee that TSA agents aren't in the back room snickering and making rude comments about my body?

I am flying to visit my parents this Christmas and then I am done. I'll take Amtrak or Greyhound, even if it takes 3 days.

Anonymous said...

Basic violation of the 4th Amendment of The Bill of Right. What our great country has come to, it is shameful! I will be flying out of one of our neighboring countries from now on. I will not subject myself to this type of abuse, especially when it is one of the most inefficient ways to secure a flight. There are more efficient,less costly and less invasive ways, but then again they are not they don't make companies like Rapiscan Systems as much money. Lets also not forget that one of the main advocates for full body scanners in Michael Chertoff whose security firm Chertoff Group is a consultant for Rapiscan, talk about conflict of interest!! Yes ladies a gentlemen we are money making pawns

Anonymous said...

I have an artificial hip and went through security at an airport that does not have the new machines. It was the most intrusive and degrading experience I've ever had. One's gut reaction is to slap someone when your private parts are touched. This simply should not be the policy of the US government. I will think long and hard before I ever fly again.

Ryan said...

You are trying to plug the wrong holes in security with the body scan & pat downs. Instead they should be focusing on who they let onto the plane. The No Fly List is a joke, all a terrorist needs is a fake id and a fake boarding pass to get past the initial security screener. A determined terrorist will refuse the xray & electronic body scan, having hid the bomb or weapon up his @$$. The pat downs won't find it. They then board the plane using the real boarding pass they bought under someone else's real name.

The security screeners need a method of verifying that boarding passes and ID's are legit. Right now they just glance that the name matches the name on your ID and the picture on your id matches your face. I've seen better security for buying beer at the liquor store with the ID card scan machines.

The screeners need to be able to scan a boarding pass, and have the airline computers verify that it is real and original. Then they need to scan ID's into a computer and have the State DMV verify they are legit with photo. In case of a passport, then a passport photo should show up on the screen. If the person is an OUS citizen, the foriegn country's passport computer needs to be connected.

Later after getting past security, ID's need to be checked again at the gate so that the same person is getting on the right plane.

nps_ca said...

You guys have a problem on your hands... Wake up

http://blogs.reuters.com/ask/2010/11/12/are-new-security-screenings-affecting-your-decision-to-fly/

Anonymous said...

Bob,

It is clear that the pat-downs are a punitive measure to make people use the scanners but the real point is that American citizens are being treated like criminals and having their 4th amendment rights violated just to travel. Granted air travel is not a right but this also isn't Soviet Russia. These procedures do not make us safer and every right we relinquish in the name of "security" is lost forever. What's next cavity searches? TSA likes to state that procedures are well received and there are few complaints but I will wager that this is about to change.

Jobeth66 said...

Bob, I asked some questions at 5:30pm on November 11, that have yet to be responded to. I'd really like to see answers to those. I also have a few more. I sometimes travel with my adult autistic son, who has issues with being touched by anyone. What will the TSA response be if I advise the TSO of this, opt him out of the scanner, and when they touch him he panics and physically lashes out?

@LTSO with Answers, posting on 11/14 at 6:18 pm, you said with regard to photography/filming This will vary from location to location if you are able to or not.

That should NOT be the case. For any searching being done in public there should be no expectation of privacy, and if the TSA can film this, I can certainly film it. There should also not be ANY question of 'location to location'. The TSA is a FEDERAL organization. Rules and guidelines should be seamless regardless of location, and the traveling public should know what the rules are, at all times. With regard to recording in private, that may be a stickier situation depending on location. In a single-party state, as long as I consent to the filming, then whether the TSA consents or not is irrelevant. If in a dual-party state, that may be different. But anything that takes place in the public eye is public should be able to be legally filmed or photographed.

Marie said...

I just want to inform the travelling public that yes, it is indeed punitive. If we did nothing for the people who refuse to step through the scanners, wouldn't you just complain that the TSA is not doing their job correctly when someone like Richard Reid, the shoe bomber, the London bombers, the Liquid Bombers, the UPS bomber, or the Pan Am flight or the 9-11 flight occur? The pat down is a noninvasive pat down that slides the palms of the hand over nonsensitive areas and the back of the hand over sensitive areas such as between and under the breast (NEVER cupping), where the leg meets the torso (not between this area as some mistakenly believe), and along the waist band (NOT REACHING IN like someone here believes).
Or, we could just do as the Germans do and put a few men with submachine guns and bomb sniffing dogs right at the check point to ensure your safety, but then you'd probably just complain about that too, eh?

Anonymous said...

So chances of being injured by a terrorist, even without these "enhanced" procedures, is less than being attacked by a shark. But the chance that my privacy and Constitutionally protected rights will be violated by TSA is about 100% now?

JustMe said...

Bob, I would like the TSA's thoughts on former Assistant Administrator and Director of Security Operations at TSA, Mo McGowan's comments regarding these new procedures:

"Nobody likes having their Fourth Amendment rights violated at the security line, but, um, the truth of the matter is, we're gonna have to do it."

Video: http://www.comcast.net/video/backlash-against-airport-body-scans/1645134449/

Anonymous said...

Apparently, my husband and I were selected for random pat down. I am very very upset about how this was handled. We weren't selected for pat down because we failed or refused a full body scan. He passed his full body scan. (but still was patted down for no reason at all.) I was never allowed to do the full body scan.

I was in line to get the body scan. A TRS agent came over to me and told me to get out of that line. He pointed for me to get in line for the metal scanner instead. Maybe someone at TRS can explain how it is that you can randomly select someone to pat down and prevent from submitting to the body scan. I would think that the body scan would be a much much better method of screening me than touching me. I guess not. You apparently don't trust the accuracy of the body scanner and believe that a pat down is BETTER.

What I am most upset about is that I had no choice in this matter whatsoever to NOT be touched. I did NOT want to be touched. I told the TRS agent I did not want to be touched & that I was in line for the body scanner but was told to get out of the line.

I was FORCED to have the pat down. The TRS agent said that once you go through the metal detector you can't change your mind. It wasn't my CHOICE to go through the metal detector.

If I would have known that you could randomly select a passenger and force them to be touched using the new enhanced pat down method (instead of being scanned) I would have canceled my flight. I will NEVER fly again after this humiliation.

Doesn't sound to me like you even trust your own body scanning equipment that you are FORCING passengers to submit instead to pat downs. There is something seriously wrong with that.

Anonymous said...

I might be willing to believe that there "is nothing punitive about it" if the new enhanced frisk had not been rolled out hand-in-hand with the naked-picture machine. As it is, the humiliating pat-downs are a transparent effort to coerce people's "consent."

vepxistqaosani said...

Hey, Bob -- I do have a medical device: two rods and two screws in my left leg. You guys have never yet detected it (the only airport that ever did was in Frankfurt, DE, in 2000). This has, naturally, colored my perception of the TSA: If you can't find a metal object that I _know_ is there, how can you possibly be competent enough to find stuff we _don't know_ is there?

And -- how can you possible tell if a metal cylinder inside my bones is a real medical device or a clever way to disguise explosives? Will I have to have my leg amputated in order to fly?

Anonymous said...

Without professional profiling, these procedures are meaningless. Blind adherence to these simplistic procedures produces absurd results and does not enhance security. If anything, as things become more predictable, they are less secure! Profile with smart, trained personnel who have the authority to use common sense. Right now, safety is secured by vigilant passengers, not the TSA. Oh, and let's not forget the gross violation of privacy rights! I didn't fight two tours in Iraq to see our rights undermined at home by inane and ineffective bureaucratic rules.

Anonymous said...

On Monday, Napolitano said TSA and her department are acting responsibly "with good intelligence, with risk-based analysis," and with partners around the world, but DHS can't be the only ones working to protect citizens.

"Look, everybody has a role to play," she said. "And if people don't want to play that role, if they want to travel by some other means, of course that's their right. This is the United States, of course they have that right. But again, this is all being done as a process to make sure that the traveling public is safe."

She said efforts by websites like OptOutDay.com amount to saying, "Well, we don't want to be a part of that. We don't want to play a part of security."


Well thanks for spelling that out for us Secretary Napolitano. If we don't like it, we're welcome to find another way to get there.

It seems to me that the TSA should just go ahead and close this blog. There's no way the moderators are going to comment on these hot topics. The TSA is going to do what they want to do and we're powerless to stop them.

Anonymous said...

Bob, what about the "random" pat downs at the gate? Is there any way to opt out of those? If not, will I be fined $10K or subject to imprisonment if I decline the pat down and refuse to fly? And, will I be banned from flying if I refuse the pat-down? I'm assuming so on that last question, but that's kind of a bummer.

Anonymous said...

Bob,
The pat-down is punitive and a point of TSA Tyranny. The TSA is creating more fear, terror, and is more of a threat to our country, our republic, our way of life, than Al-Queda. There is so much group think in DHS and TSA that you just dont get it.

Anonymous said...

Your moderation is so blatant. I am done trying to comment on your website. Government censorship.
I have contacted my Senators, Kyl and McCain and Congressman Mitchell. You may want to ignore the backlash, but you must now know about the very increasing petition putting you on notice. I will contact my representatives daily in Congress until you will ultimately have to back down from this ill advised directive and the public will once again be able to fly without being groped .

Anonymous said...

either of these procedures will most certainly out and make a fool of those of us who are transgendered.

Anonymous said...

Your statement "There’s nothing punitive about it" gets to the heart of the problem. TSA doesn't see it as punitive about it based on two assumptions: 1) My time is not valuable; and 2) Intrusive airport screening is worth it. I challenge both assumptions. My time is valuable, and people pay me substantial sums of money to do things for them. TSA does not pay for the time it uses. Intrusive screening is NOT how plots are being foiled. Once you determine to search externally for an object that will fit inside a body cavity you are wasting my money. The soon-to-be unionized TSA will simply waste my money faster.

That's why we feel punished by TSA, we are being punished!

Anonymous said...

This was not the "change" that I "hoped" for when I voted Obama.

Anonymous said...

These new pat down searches are aknee jerk reaction for last years situation. Whats next,cavity searches because some else does something stupid.

Anonymous said...

OSHA rules for ionizing radiation exposure are as follows:
1910.1096(d)(2)
Every employer shall supply appropriate personnel monitoring equipment, such as film badges, pocket chambers, pocket dosimeters, or film rings, and shall require the use of such equipment by:
1910.1096(d)(2)(i)
Each employee who enters a restricted area under such circumstances that he receives, or is likely to receive, a dose in any calendar quarter in excess of 25 percent of the applicable value specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section; and
1910.1096(d)(2)(ii)
Each employee under 18 years of age who enters a restricted area under such circumstances that he receives, or is likely to receive, a dose in any calendar quarter in excess of 5 percent of the applicable value specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section; ..

My question is: will the TSA issue radiation badges for frequent travelers, or may travelers bring their own dosimeters?

Anonymous said...

Number one, flying is a privilege, there should be no religious exemptions from searches, we all deserve the same level of scrutiny if we choose to fly. Second, I think most Americans would want the option to not fly and get a refund if their genitals need to be touched in any way.

Rob said...

I'm really dismayed by how easily Americans are willing to flush their rights down the toilet out of fear. What the TSA is doing with these "enhanced" procedures (even the language is creepy and smacks of the USSR more than the USA...) is nothing short of offensive.

After paying hundreds, maybe thousands, of dollars for a ticket, one must be treated like a criminal and have his dignity and right to privacy violated. And if one protests? Bullying. Threats. Is this really what has become of our country? I'd be ashamed of myself if I worked for the TSA.

Personally, I will not fly unless it's a dire emergency. Flying is such a miserable experience these days - thanks to the TSA - that it just isn't worth it. No other country on Earth treats it's paying airline passengers will less respect and less dignity than the US.

The TSA needs to remember something: all of you have jobs because we CHOSE to fly.

Chris Butler said...

First off, I would like to start out by saying I am a 15 year old boy. I have just recently flown out of the country on s mission trip to Jamaica this past summer. At the Charlotte-Douglas International Airport, I as specifically pulled aside and made to go into the "naked scanner" because I was wearing a pair of skinny jeans and a pull-over. I asked them what the machine was, and they told me "it just takes my picture". They failed to mention that I would be exposed to such radiation and my picture would be taken in the full nude. Again, I mention that I am a 15 year old male, a MINOR. Out of all of the shady looking people in line, they pull aside the preppy boy.
I am seriously considering going to the higher authorities in my area for child pornography or something of the sort. This is just outrageous.

Anonymous said...

The pat-down policy is appalling and a total invasion of privacy. I am disgusted that anyone would think that such a policy is appropriate. And I can only imagine how the poor TSA agents must feel at being asked to completely invade another person's privacy or lose their jobs.

The AIT machines are a public health risk and put us all in danger. If they were safe, why would the pilots unions be boycotting them?

Get real, TSA. Your policies are abusive and flat-out wrong.

Anonymous said...

I don't like pat downs and I don't like the whole-body scanners.

Who said I have to give up my 4th amendment protections without due process??

I will avoid flying and I will refuse the whole-body scanners if I HAVE to fly.

I encourage EVERYONE to refuse the scanners. Jam up the lines...this is not about security, its about control. The public knows it and TSA knows it.

Don't give up your 4th amendment protection from unreasonable search and seizure without TSA requiring a due process warrant from a judge - for each individual passenger searched.

4th amendment verbiage:
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.


This will never get past the blog police....but I feel better just typing it.
And if it does make it to the blog page, its because I said it wouldn't.

Anonymous said...

My 16 year old son left $20 in his golf bag. Funny thing it disapeared after a TSA screener left the notice in his bag. I realize he should not have left money in his golf bag but 16 year olds don't think.

Jonathan Byrne said...

Bob,

Please just post the official pat-down guidelines TSA gives to the checkpoint personnel. We have a legal right to see those under FOIA. My requests to the TSA FOIA office have gone ignored and I’m considering a lawsuit to force their release. How hard is it to post the internal memo that defines what is required in a pat-down?

Anonymous said...

I'm generally fine with search procedures designed to keep us all a little bit safer. However, the new pat down procedures are sexually discriminatory. If a TSA agent is allowed to run her hands completely around a woman's breasts, why shouldn't a male TSA agent be allowed to run his hands completely around the male genitalia? The danger of hiding something prohibited is equally great.

Anonymous said...

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.

Anonymous said...

Look, I don't mind the new body scanner. And when about 20 people including myself were selected for random screening and sent to the body scanner, I didn't object. (Though you guys told us you were simply bringing us to a "faster" line, which was a lie, but I'm willing to overlook that.)
I went through the scanner. It didn't show anything. Which is what I expected, since I didn't have an underwire on my bra, nor did I have ANYTHING AT ALL in my pockets. Or anything metal on me at all except my jeans zipper and button. So I walked through and then they immediately did the pat-down. WTF? You had already seen that I had nothing on me. And I was told it was because I was selected for random screening -- not because anything was blurry or unseen.
I'm willing to walk through whatever machines you want. But don't touch my breasts, my waist, and especially keep your fingers far away from my vagina. Thanks.

Andrew said...

I submitted a comment on Friday night which was not posted. I did not include any offensive or vulgar terms. This site is a joke.

CarrotTop TSO said...

I'd like to address some of the incendiary videos that have lately appeared on various web sites.

First

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26809.htm

This video is claiming that TSA accosted a 3 year old. This appears to have been filmed at least 5 years ago. The TSA have not worn the "original" white shirts in many years and the "2 tries to clear the walk through metal detector before being subjected to secondary screening" policy was abandoned at about the same time. It is unfortunate that this child was so upset by the screening process, however due to the highly agitated state of the child, a hand held metal detector search would be impossible. In situations such as these the best course of action is to screen the child as quickly as reasonably possible and reunite them with the parent, blankie, shoes or toy whose absence sparked the outburst.

Also

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7txGwoITSj4&feature=aso

As I listened to the exchange between the officer and passenger I heard the officer completely and professionally explain the "enhanced pat-down". When the passenger stated "If you touch my junk, I'll have you arrested." the officer offered no argument and called for a supervisor. Throughout the entire posted incident TSA responded professionally.

@Anonymous November 13, 2010 3:53 PM

I, in no way, feel that I am lending to an atmosphere of intimidation an coercion. I am a middle aged mother of two, military veteran, registered voter AND proud of the job that I do. I feel it would be irresponsible to leave my position. I strive everyday to set an example for the officers I work beside and supervise. The most effective changes come from within an agency. If I, and others like me, don't continue to foster an atmosphere of professionalism and courtesy who will?

Anonymous said...

I won't fly anymore. Hope that is what you were trying to accomplish.

Anonymous said...

until we make these new ways change I will never fly again. how invasive and stupid I would rather risk another 911 then make all of america feel like a criminal. how can we treat other nations with respect when this is how we treat our own. does TSA screen people flying in from other countries this way?

Peter Bjerkerot said...

I have a great idea! If you don't like the screening equipment or the pat-down...DON'T FLY. I think that Greyhound goes to every place an airplane flies here in the USA...or drive a car. No one is telling anyone they have to fly. We are all born with the same optional equipment...yours is really not that special of different than any other member of the human race.

Anonymous said...

The use of AIT units and the new pat-down procedures go too far. Citizens do not check their constitutional rights at the airport curb. I respectfully disagree with Ms. Napolitano's characterization of these measures and believe the trade-off between security and individual freedom is too great in this instance. As President Lincoln so famously stated in 1863, ours is a "government of the people, by the people, for the people..."

Anonymous said...

A 67 year old man who has had surgery for prostate cancer I always wear an large male pad in my underwear for long flights. This is surely going to appear in the AIT imaging and will probably require further investigation by TSA screeners. Moreover, I have had extensive X-radiation treatments for my cancer and I do not want any more exposure, however slight. So I am almost certainly going to have to undergo an invasive pat-down and perhaps inspection of my underwear and pad. How does TSA propose dealing with this situation? What are my options? I think the TSA has gone too far. There must be many men in my situation and many women in similar ones.

Anonymous said...

Why don't we just make everyone fly naked? Then we won't need scanners and TSA staff can readily be replaced by volunteers.

Dan Wilson said...

I will be flying next month. I will be opting out of the backscatter nude imaging scan. I will be having someone use my cell phone to film any "advanced pat down", and yes I will be using it as evidence in the event that I feel I have been sexually assaulted by the TSA operative.

When these things went into operation at Oakland, I was furious. I am even more so now.

I, like so many others, will resist this violation of our 4th amendment rights in the name of "security."

Silence Dogood said...

Silence Dogood says:
Kudos to rationally speaking!
Ok, I'm going to explain this to all the slow learners out there one more time; FLYING IS NOT A RIGHT, IT IS A PRIVILEGE. It is always an option for you to chose to use your OWN transportation or conversely, NOT to travel. I am part of the PUBLIC and I do have the RIGHT to expect to be FREE from being vaporized and scattered in tiny little pieces when I chose to purchase a ticket and travel on PRIVATELY OWNED GOVERNMENT REGULATED transportation. GET A GRIP, GROW UP.
I have no doubt that if you were offered to fly on either A: an aircraft full of people who went through screening or B: an aircraft full of people who had no screening you would chose A.
People like to PISS AND MOAN and get attention, yet not offer any reasonable suggestion to correct what they feel is wrong.
How do you quantify prevention??? How do any of you know for sure what potential plot was prevented because of the various searches and inspections TSA does. NONE OF YOU. You cannot quantify prevention. But I do know there HAS NOT been another such plot since TSA began the thorough screenings.
I like safety; it is not giving up any freedoms or liberty. If you want to go to a private exclusive club and they say you have to be patted down to enter to make sure you have no weapons, you either submit or don't go in. GET IT???

Anonymous said...

If the TSA is going to infringe on our 4th amendment right to be secure in our person, especially to such a perverse degree, it speaks volumes about we average citizens that their arent dozens of stories already about TSA officers with a lead projectile lodged in their craniums by an accelerant-powered machine.

SIC SEMPER TYRANNIS

asmallstep4man said...

So Bob,

Why don't we just skip the whole metal detector shenanigans and go straight to electronic strip-searches?

Oh yeah, and if I object to that then how about you use them fancy, enhanced, new pat-down procedures and feel me up?

That's exactly what I want for my holiday travels. TSA can keep their overbearing government hands to themselves, I'll drive.

Anonymous said...

"Pat-downs are conducted by same gender officers." So, obviously you wouldn't want a heterosexual man patting-down a female because that would be sexual assault. But, will I be guaranteed that I'll be patted-down by a straight man? Will I be able to ask the TSA Agent what their sexual orientation is?

Anonymous said...

I refuse to fly again until these pat-down procedures are revised. I will not consent to the degradation and humiliation of either the body-imaging machines or the enhanced pat-down. No one has the right to force me to choose between a virtual strip down and being touched in a way I feel completely inappropriate and violating, not to mention that the long-term effects of the image scanner on our health is unknown.

J said...

I am extremely concerned about installation of whole body imaging scanners by the TSA under the Department of Homeland Security. Despite promises that these machines would not be used for primary screening in airports, they are now being rolled out in numerous airports for that purpose. This program is an extremely poor use of taxpayer funds and and a real blow to health and privacy concerns.

There are a number of concerns regarding these scanners, which use radiation to make essentially a naked photo. First, I do not feel they have been anywhere close to being shown to be safe. In fact, a number of scientists have questioned their safety, as original calculations averaged the radiation throughout the body, instead of looking at the concentration at the skin level, where the x-rays or radio waves would be focused (see http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=126833083). As someone who is at a higher risk for skin cancer, I do not what to expose myself to any more radiation than absolutely necessary. And it appears that the committee that examined the scanners and has assured the public of their safety is comprised mainly of these machines’ manufacturers, who are of course profiting greatly by their installation. Each machine costs us taxpayers $130,000-$170,000.

As a woman, I am not comfortable with submitting to a virtual strip search. This process should not be done just because law-abiding citizens want to fly on a plane. Our country is large, and air travel is often the only viable means to traverse America. I feel these machines violate our Constitution (Fourth Amendment), which guards against unreasonable search and seizure. Numerous courts have upheld the legal standard of reasonable suspicion.

The TSA has said that we have the right to “opt out” of the new “naked” body scanners. However, the alternative is an “enhanced pat down” that includes feeling the breasts and genitals. As you can imagine, I am strongly against this process, which I feel borders on sexual assault/molestation and seems extremely punitive. Airline passengers are not criminals. I am a law-abiding citizen whose has not done anything wrong. Although I realize that terrorism is a concern for the TSA and Department of Homeland Security, these new procedures are NOT worth it. Millions and people should not have their rights so grossly invaded to try to prevent a tiny risk of a terrorist event.

I am concerned that this expansion of these new body scanners and their enhanced pat down alternative have been done without any Congressional authority and has not been vetted through the courts (http://travel.usatoday.com/flights/2010-07-13-1Abodyscans13_ST_N.htm). Every day thousands of travelers are subjected to these searches and if they resist or question the process, the TSA will threaten to not allow them to fly.

The Constitution guarantees all Americans freedom from unreasonable search and seizure, and an invasive procedure which clearly violates the spirit of this cherished document should not be implemented lightly.

jay said...

As a woman, I am not comfortable with submitting to a virtual strip search. This process should not be done just because law-abiding citizens want to fly on a plane. Our country is large, and air travel is often the only viable means to traverse America. I feel these machines violate our Constitution (Fourth Amendment), which guards against unreasonable search and seizure. Numerous courts have upheld the legal standard of reasonable suspicion.

The TSA has said that we have the right to “opt out” of the new “naked” body scanners. However, the alternative is an “enhanced pat down” that includes feeling the breasts and genitals. As you can imagine, I am strongly against this process, which I feel borders on sexual assault/molestation and seems extremely punitive. Airline passengers are not criminals. I am a law-abiding citizen whose has not done anything wrong. Although I realize that terrorism is a concern for the TSA and Department of Homeland Security, these new procedures are NOT worth it. Millions and people should not have their rights so grossly invaded to try to prevent a tiny risk of a terrorist event.

I am concerned that this expansion of these new body scanners and their enhanced pat down alternative have been done without any Congressional authority and has not been vetted through the courts (http://travel.usatoday.com/flights/2010-07-13-1Abodyscans13_ST_N.htm).

J said...

Just look at one woman's real account of these patdowns:

http://www.ourlittlechatterboxes.com/2010/11/tsa-sexual-assault.html

Anonymous said...

Part of the problem is that it is not necessarily a choice between a scan or a pat down. If you "fail" the scan, i.e. the image is not clear, you get patted down anyway. While I don't mind being scanned, I do object to the aggressive pat down as unreasonable. If I understand how this works correctly it is TSA's stance that once I have bought an airline ticket and shown up at the airport I don't have a choice in the matter any more.

I would also note that TSA's unwillingness to discuss details of their security measures amounts to security through obscurity. From that I infer that TSA also makes heavy use of security pixie dust.

Anonymous said...

This is a joke. I have an insulin pump and for being honest it takes 30 min to get my pat down and get felt up. Have you considered risk based profiling.
Seems like you are spending lots of time for very little risk.
Wast of my TAX $ and a massive lines.
It would be nice what the rules are. I would be happy to do what ever I can to make it smooth.

Overseas Visitor said...

I visit USA for business trips a few times a year and to many places worldwide. With these new pat-down, scan etc, I am asking to move all my meetings outside of USA.

Anonymous said...

I have two knee impants. I just wish all airports had the full body scanner. I've been through the enhanced pat-down several times at DFW and some of the TSA dudes like it more than others. Know what I mean? TSA = POS

Anonymous said...

As a airline crew member this policy infuriates me and other fellow crew members. not only are we subjected to this 15 times a month but 180 times a yr of radiation treatment or touching of my private parts. what they the tsa is not saying is we will eventually have no choice to opt out of the virtual strip searches. that is tsas and homeland securitys goal. this needs to stop now. wish i can say I would stop flying but I have a family to support so those who say just "dont fly if you dont like it does not apply the only other choice is to boycott the airlines until they are forced to fight tsa themselves! thank you tsa for subjecting people to these searches and threatening peoples livlihoods too. I feel so safe now!!! sarcasm intended! oh and whats the point of strip searcehs if cargo on plane is not going through xray machines too. they arent and they probably wont while the public gets groped while they are being told they are safer.

The Morgan Family said...

First, verbal irony or sarcasm.
Secondly, please enlighten me as to what these body scans/pat downs are going to recover that metal detectors/bagg...age searches don’t AND THAT we’re not scared of someone Paris Hilton’ing it? Well, then perh...aps I would like to officially patent the NEW TSA SHOWER PROCEDURE. We should be separated by men and women, regardless of sexual orientation, and made to communally shower in front of guards before redressing and boarding our flights. There, now I’m pretty sure that would take the fear out of our flight. BTW, if you don’t know me by now, that would be verbal irony.
Thirdly, those of you who claim this is for keeping your families safe… Really? And you don’t worry about your kids who attend or wives and husbands who teach at public schools? Because, STATISTICALLY SPEAKING, they have a far greater chance of encountering a terrorist in action at school than in the air. So, I know, if these body scanners/pat downs keep us that much safer in the airports, let’s also have them in public schools! They’re governmentally overseen, so we can avoid the constitution just like we’re doing at the airports. And let’s see, some schools already require kids to walk through metal detectors and have baggage searches just like airports do, so if these help the airports so much, just think how much we could help our kids!! Think of all the drug-trafficing in our schools we can stop! We just hire someone (probably a 26-year old male and female, regardless of their sexual orientation) to oversee the body scan, and if a parent objects to putting that much extra radiation into their child every day, they can OPT for the pat-down. To be specific, this is how we’ll handle your 15-year old daughter, “use either the front or back of his or her hands to feel your body, including buttocks, around breasts, and between the legs, feeling up to the top of the thigh.” I mean, you don’t like it? Well, there’s private school and homeschooling options (just like there are other options to fly).
It’s a slippery slope of logic people (LOGIC 101 in college). There’s no difference between schools and airplanes (in fact our kids are less safe in schools than in airplances), but I’d love to hear one of you clamor for this.
What about universities? Let’s put body scans/pat downs there too. Before you walk onto campus, you must go through this. Where does this end??
There’s a reason we were given these rights, people, and at some point we need to determine are we heading down a slippery slope of total loss of civil liberties some day?
Also, I can assure you the radiation is not safe at all. And, BTW, TSA and the FDA have yet to provide specifically how much radiation one is exposed to with these machines. While yes, you do get exposed to radiation at a slightly higher level in flight, it isn’t like getting an X-Ray.

Anonymous said...

I haven't seen anything about the safety of the screening machines. I'm pregnant and don't want to be exposed to unecessary radiation....but if I opt out of the enhanced screening, I have to be vigorously patted down and as a pregnant woman....I really don't want some person touching me that way (especially my pregnant belly!) So I have to choose between unecessary radiation or being frisked? Seems unfair. By the way I was searched with the "old" method of the back of the hands and that was very intrusive - they really got into my clothes - bra, waistband, etc using the backs of their hand so I cannot imagine how much more intrusive the new method of the front hand pat down is! ugh!

Jerry said...

Why doesn’t TSA use bomb sniffing dogs just as law enforcement does? That way there would be no invasion of privacy and, the machines would not need to be purchased and used. Also, passengers wouldn't be subject to the possible unsafe effects of the machine and the innocent would be treated as such. The dogs could be taken down the line as passengers are lined up as well as be placed after the security check points as passengers enter the secured area. The dogs could also be walked within the secured area. This could be done with cargo as well.

Anonymous said...

This email is in reference to TSA. As an American that has been flying for over34 years and have seen all the changes over that time I take issue with the mindless check points at airports in the US. It was bad enough when they use to mindlessly ask if we packed our own bags but what goes on now is a disgrace. Can anyone honestly explain how this circus at our airports is the best way to secure flights? This foolish dance we make law abiding citizens go thru is the exact kind of nonsence citizen are upset about from their Govorment officials. If this does not get smarter soon it will only be added on to the ever mounting foolishness we Americans will change at the voting boxes.

A 4th amendment refresher - The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized.

Anonymous said...

Democratic societies do not grant "right to safety" as 100% safety is impossible (neither it's in the constitution). It is possible to maintain privacy and dignity 100%, which are protected by the Constitution.

Anonymous said...

Look Mr. Anonymous are you to scared to tell people your real name? You have several choices Get searched or don't fly. The TSA screeners are doing there job protecting us.Do you want everybody to start complaining about the company you work for?

Anonymous said...

I know I will be joining the boycotts. I avoid flying whenever I can, but sometimes you just can't avoid it. Hope my screener is attractive :).

Anonymous said...

The TSA has obviously never intercepted a terrorist. The "weapons" they claim to have seized are certainly nailfiles and nose-hair trimmers and the like.

If the TSA had ever actually hassled a real bomb-carrying terrorist, it would be a huge media event -- either because the TSA would finally have something to brag about, or because of the explosion.

Anonymous said...

This is such a complete violation of the Fourth Amendment -- I am frankly stunned that it is not already being reviewed by the US Supreme Court.

Forgetting even that, starting with United 93, every terrorist attack that got as far as the airport itself has been stopped not by TSA or other screeners, but by the passengers, these new pat search / porn scanner procedures are simply unconstitutional.

An argument could *easily* be made in a court of law that refusing to allow an American citizen to board a flight that arrives and departs in the US, and for which said citizen has lawfully purchased a ticket, is unconstitutional per precedent cited regarding Freedom of Movement in Article IV, § 2 of the Constitution, not to mention the above noted violation of the Fourth Amendment.

The U.S. Supreme Court dealt with the right to travel in the case of Saenz v. Roe, 526 U.S. 489 (1999). In that case, Justice John Paul Stevens, writing for the majority, held that the United States Constitution protected three separate aspects of the right to travel among the states: the right to enter one state and leave another, ***"the right to be treated as a welcome visitor rather than an unwelcome alien" (protected by the "privileges and immunities" clause in Article IV, § 2)***.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_Four_of_the_United_States_Constitution#Clause_1:_Privileges_and_Immunities

There is an exception to the Fourth Amendment for citizens crossing in or outside of US borders, thus it is known as the Border Search Exception (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Border_search_exception ), but it can only be enforced by lawful *customs* agents, and should not EVER apply to anyone traveling *within* the United States, who should reasonably expect not to be subjected to unlawful search and seizure of their personal belongings or of their person without probable cause.

Wake up America! You have LEGAL RIGHTS under the Constitution and TSA is violating those rights by forcing you to comply with their invasive illegal search and seizure processes.

Jan Sutton - Cincinnati said...

I am not a frequent air traveler within the USA, but I do travel to Europe regularly for vacations. I am appalled at the new X-ray and pat down procedures. It is a clear violation of civil rights. We are Americans and should be protected by our government, not physically molested. Also, you may claim there is no sexual intent or sadism involved, but you cannot guarantee that, now and in the future. I recognize that the possibility certainly exists and could be exactly where these procedures are headed. You cannot speak for every person ever hired, and I'm wondering just who would be interested in this job. Not me. These procedures are sickening. I'm glad I've travelled extensively, because this is a real barrier to doing so in the future. You can take your procedures and hide with them in a deep, dark closet, where presumably you'll feel safe and secure.

Anonymous said...

Hats off to TSA!! I support ANYTHING you do to keep our flights safe!! If people don't like the requirements, they HAVE a CHOICE...DRIVE!!
I personally think that ALL should have to do body scans, like it or not. It is the TSA job to make sure that the rest of us are safe! Do whatever you need to do...people need to get over themselves...Safety is WAY more important than a few seconds of feeling uncomfortable.

Anonymous said...

The TSA needs to be put on a leash. These increasingly severe policies will not stop bad things from happening in airports or on airplanes. The TSA is frothing at the mouth looking to accomplish the impossible task of stopping all attacks. Instead, attacks will continue while travelers are evermore mistreated.

Banning water bottles is stupid - you don't even test the bottles for dangerous contents, so an attacker can just keep trying. I've even gotten water bottles through these checkpoints. All this does is allow the concession stands past security to see high priced water. Only Coke and Pepsi (Dasani and Aquafina) win.

These "naked scanners" only benefit the manufactures of the machines. The instances of inappropriate conduct by agents will increase, the backscatter companies will get richer, and terrorists will just find another way.

RB said...

So TSA is going to investigate Tyner and try to subject him to unreasonable fines for exiting the checkpoint after being ordered to by TSA.

I have to wonder what TSA is trying to do. Does TSA really want to tick off the entirety of America by showing us who's boss?

Is it TSA's goal of making sure the public will never support anything TSA is trying to do?

Is it TSA's goal to make sure that no one respects TSA employees and give as little cooperation as possible when transiting TSA checkpoints?

Are idiots in charge of TSA?

Anonymous said...

We have been told again and again these machines can not save scans, yet Gizmodo and a FOIA request prove otherwise. These images are from a millimeter wave scanner employed by US marshals at a courthouse.

These images are lower res than those produced by backscatter, but both kinds of machines are used by the TSA, and it is obvious they are capable of storing images, and said images can be retrieved.

http://gizmodo.com/5690749/

Bryan said...

I'm waiting for TSA's response to the John Tyner incident. I've watched all 30 minutes or so of that encounter and I have to say that I am utterly disgusted by what I witnessed. I work for a state agency - I am in enforcement and I understand my responsibilities as delegated to me by the statutes and I understand the rights of those who are subject to any of my investigations. I also understand my absolute duty to avoid any possible abuse of those powers delegated to my position under state law. TSA has become an abusive behometh that has scarred any reputable intent envisioned by Congress when the agency was enabled. The John Tyner incident proved that the measures implemented by TSA are not intended to keep passengers safe - they are intended to subdue and intimidate. It isn't enough that a passenger is given the choice to submit to a virtual strip search or an invasive and humiliating groping session for doing nothing other than attempting to travel from one destination to another - now if you choose not to participate in either procedure and simply want to consider an alternative mode of transportation you can now be fined $11,000?!! That's very obviously a punitive measure for not submitting! I hope the American people see what is going on with the John Tyner incident and vocalize their discord with TSA's ongoing abuse. I'm outraged at this incident! This is shameful!

Anonymous said...

I found this as a comment somewhere else, but I couldn't have said it better myself:

"I would like to know how the TSA is so easily able to circumvent the 4th amendment. They are simply not allowed to search anyone at any time without a warrant for each individual, judicially sanctioned and supported by probable cause. There are no 'blanket' searches of any kind. How are they able to get away with this?"

Indeed. What the TSA is doing is unconscionable.

Anonymous said...

It took me the better part of two days to read all the comments, but mothing new has been posted since Sunday? There were many questions here that have yet to be answered. I spent the better part of an hour combing thorugh the tsa website for the answer to mine and was unable to find it. Currently according to your website there are only 68 airports with AIT machines, and currently my local airport is not one of them. Since I will have no choice but to use the WTMD, will I still be forced to get the pat down, even though I didn't "opt-out"?

Rock said...

So much for not being able to save body scans:

http://gizmodo.com/5690749/

"At the heart of the controversy over "body scanners" is a promise: The images of our naked bodies will never be public. U.S. Marshals in a Florida Federal courthouse saved 35,000 images on their scanner. These are those images.

A Gizmodo investigation has revealed 100 of the photographs saved by the Gen 2 millimeter wave scanner from Brijot Imaging Systems, Inc., obtained by a FOIA request after it was recently revealed that U.S. Marshals operating the machine in the Orlando, Florida courthouse had improperly-perhaps illegally-saved images of the scans of public servants and private citizens."

Queue Blogger Bob or the apologist TSO's , with one of three responses:

"this never happens with the tsa because we are somehow incapable of this"

"if you don't like it, don't fly"

"gotta catch terrists - you guys are great - if its a choice between terrirsts and my liberyt, I choose safety"

Well? Save us some time with a 1-2-3.

Anonymous said...

If this level of security is really necessary. Maybe it's to dangerous to fly. In years past I flew over 100K miles per year. This year I flew less than 3K. Next year I'm choosing not to fly for TSA security reasons and to use teleconferences and ground transportation.

TaraBelle said...

YOU GUYS ARE AWFUL! I mean, what an invasion of privacy have you no dignity?

Anonymous said...

We bought non-refundable tickets to take our children to DisneyWorld for Christmas. It was to be a very special family time as one of our sons has a brain tumor. Now, we must either not go, loose the $1000+ we paid in tickets (and drive there - 3 days each way, thus shortening 7 days at Disney to 1 day), or subject our children to being inappropriately touched or photographed. This HAS to be breaking child pornography laws! There are men in prison for touching young boys where the TSA agents are allowed to touch them! This is out of control!!!! What is a mother to do?

Anonymous said...

TSA is going to be dismantled. I and others are going to make sure of this. Enjoy your joy ride while you have it because it's not going to last. The full body scanners, and molestation you are doing is a direct violation of the 4th Amendment, and despite what one of your officers recently said, the CUSTOMER of an Airline does NOT forfeit 'certain rights' when they purchase an Airline ticket. We are coming.

Anonymous said...

TSA has gotten so far out of control, that they have become the terrorist that they claim to protect against.

Now the simple of traveling requires the choice of absorbing ionizing radiation or full body grope by a stranger.

I am not terrorized by terrorist.

I am terrorized by TSA.

Anonymous said...

there have been many reports from people who have been patted down that they are not explained the procedure of what the pat down ensures. A new mother was taken out of line - opted out of the scanner due to the risk of radiation exposure and was frisked like she was a criminal NOT behind curtains but in front of everyone. The TSA agent did not tell her anything and apparently (as this happened in Ohio) refused to listen to her complaints. The Supervisor was called over and cut the woman short to tell her either get on the plane or forfeit your trip. The woman had called up an attorney who is considering suiing not only the TSA but also Homeland Security.

Anonymous said...

Can someone please explain why CAIR has issued that Muslims should not have to go through this process and that Janet Napolitano is "looking into it but for the time being they can opt out of both procedures?" If us who are not Muslim do have to go through this invasion of privacy than the Muslims should as well. After all nearly all if not most of the would be attacks have come from the very entity that CAIR supports. TERRORISM.

Anonymous said...

I find this whole thing interesting. Get a naked picture of you taken (TSA says it's not saved, yet thousands of saved TSA pictures have been found), or be molested by a TSA 'officer' (I put this in quotes for obvious 'lack of training' reasons). Not a good choice. Also, it is simply window dressing. Current threats are not passengers, but cargo - which NOTHING is being done about! Please explain the how my safety is increased by something that doesn't address the threat.

Anonymous said...

Enhanced Pat down consists of???? Regular pat down AND WHAT?
Please list the complete procedure in plain english. What is the secret?

No sane person would willingly go behind closed doors with a total stranger who has been given the authority to “touch you” without knowing what the touching will consist of!

Stephanie said...

Bob, why can't pat-downs be done in private by default? Passengers have privacy for the scans by default, why can't the low-tech alternative ALSO be given privately?

Anonymous said...

I don't care that you claim this "low" level of radiation is safe. If I am pregnant or trying to have a baby, you are not putting me near any radiation emitting machines. I assume most pregnant women will feel the same way.

So you are gonna grope every pregnant woman? Great. That's what America is all about.

Anonymous said...

Why not just go all out in the name of "Security" - Everyone entering an air terminal must strip off all clothing, deposit all items in a security box that will be loaded onto the aircraft, and pick everything up outside the terminal of their destination.

After all, it's just to make sure everyone is safe.

Yasmine said...

I just traveled last week for the first time since these awful body scanners where put in place. I refused to go into the machine, and was forced to succumb to a humiliating pat down. What a violation either way - virtual strip search or getting felt up by a complete stranger. Check out this article at NPR.org about body scanned photos posted online. First 3-1-1, now this.....completely invasive and pointless...


http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2010/11/16/131361057/website-publishes-100-pictures-of-federal-security-body-scans?sc=fb&cc=fp

John Doe said...

I promise you, this procedure will be more humiliating, degrading, and traumatic for the screener than it will be for me.

Anonymous said...

Please provide a detailed description of the pat down procedures and process. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

it was humilating to go through the scanner and then TSA still wanted to "pat me down" which means to touch my private parts. You have to be kidding. This is wrong on so many levels. I will fly as little as possible. If everyone reduces flying the airlines will force TSA to stop.

Anonymous said...

TSA Executive Management should consider:
1) monitor voice between wireless headsets of TSA worker outside and the one in the separate room watching screen...the workers may develop secret codes to identify the passenger and the image so they can talk and laugh about body parts later .
2) Place hidden microphones and cameras in the seperate room to monitor any Jokes or off-color comments about a passenger's private body parts.
3) the software should have "Automatic Time-outs in Seconds" to automatically delete image, dont depend on a worker deleting image and to minimize him/her "Staring and Studying the Image longer then necessary.
4) The worker in the room should not be able to carry in cell phones, cameras, ...etc nothing that can take a picture of the screen so they can laugh about the image body parts in the lunch/break room later especially the midnight shift.
5) You can bet some Hacker will figure out to de-code the image and place it on Internet in near future.
6) as far as the TSA worker outside in terminal not knowing who is monitoring screens inside - WORKERS DO TALK TO EACH OTHER Duh !!!!!

Anonymous said...

How interesting that most comments here are negative about what is taking place in our airports. TSA is nothing more than a smoke screen to make us feel "safe" in the air. The reality is that most packages traveling under us are not checked thus we are not safe at all. I, for one, will only fly when absolutely must do so and then I will ask for a pat down before going into their x-ray machines. I will also demand all my rights as it relates to how the procedure must be done and by whom.

Enough with this violation to our freedoms and hit them where it hurt - in the pocket by not flying unless you must. Remember, America, the only thing that really matters in this country is money so if you stop the flow of money, they may change their assaults on the traveling public.

Oh, and if you think that Napolitano or any of her high level officers get radiated in their machines, you are dead wrong. They don't get scanned because they are better than we are.

Anonymous said...

I, for one, will stop flying unless I absolutely have to. America stop having your civil rights violated by the system. Look at all the comments here and you will find that most people are highly offended by the new procedures.

Enough is enough !

Anonymous said...

I am surprised that no one is discussing the bigger issue here of Kid's getting molested by the TSA. How do we know that some disgruntled employee won’t save those images of kid's passing through the scanner and post or worse yet, sell those images to child predators? How kids are’s protected from Full Body search. How do we know that there are no perverts that stoke kid's and adults going through the pat down.
We are told over and over again to support the TSA crew since they are simply enforcing the regulations but the fact is, supporting them would simply mean accepting these outrageous molestation abusive acts.

Anonymous said...

What about pregnant women? If they aren't allowed to get dental X-Rays without a lead covering for their whole body what is protecting the womb in the AIT? And if they choose to not get radiated how is it appropriate to feel down the inside of the pants of someone like this? Or kids? Is it right to have a 6 year old cupped and prodded when if anyone else did it they would be arrested for child abuse?

Anonymous said...

People REALLY....

I love the fact that the TSA is trying to make flying safer for all involved in the skies just, like police officers on the street. If you speed and get pulled over who's fault is that???

If you leave a metal object on your person or you set off an alarm by accident with TSA and you want to fly, deal with the additional screening and don't cry about it... If you're going to be a baby about it, drive yourself, or if you don't drive, take a cab, bus or train....

I personally value my safety and appreciate anything to increase my safety whether on a plane, or on the roads....

As for the male in San Diego who didn't want his "Junk touched"...Besides wanting your 15 minutes of fame on all the major networks are you a bit homophobic???... DEAL WITH IT.....

Being a police officer for over 20 years, this pat down is not evasive...... I have located or been present when loaded firearms were located on both male and female subjects. The groin is also a favorite place to hide all types of narcotics and related smoking instruments, not to metion knives!!!!

This pat down process is minor set back for a small number of passengers to increase safety in the skies for all. I can see objecting to this process if you are hiding something or looking for your minute of fame (by having phone video going in advance).

TSA, thank you for making the skies safer for all our Mom's, women and children out there......

Anonymous said...

Or, we could just do as the Germans do and put a few men with submachine guns and bomb sniffing dogs right at the check point to ensure your safety, but then you'd probably just complain about that too, eh?

-----------------------------------------

Oh my God. I think this person might be serious... scary times.

Joseph Wiggins said...

I'll go along with the new policy without hesitation. I hate flying, and not because of security, its because I know what happens at my airport on a regular basis. I used to work for an armored car company and one of the places we went to was the Detroit airport(DTW). We drove onto the airport, right up to the gates, within feet of airplanes. We were not allowed to take any weapons inside the terminal. Do you know how often it happend? Every week. We were never screened at any time. We brought large boxes into the airport on carts that were never screened at any time. That was just us, how many others do you think are allowed to do the same? Some of the people I worked with were pretty shady. It's a HUGE hole in security that I hope will someday be plugged. TSA makes me feel safer (and might even make me a bit safer). Run me through a machine, pat me down, just remember to watch the airports back doors as well! I'm taking my first international flight this week and hope to have a safe and uneventful trip. God Bless America, and everyone else too! By the way, if anyone at the TSA wants more information about what I've said here today, I'll be more than happy to answer any questions.

Anonymous said...

TSA Please consider two things and create your policy and procedures. Kindly use common sense.

1. Full body scanners shall create health issues.

2. Pat downs are invasion of privacy. This is america for god sake.

Anonymous said...

Apparently, the censors here don't like my idea (my previous comment never got posted): opt out, undergo the pat-down and once it's completed, summon the nearest law enforcement officer and file a sexual assault charge against the agent.

Now, how is that a violation of the rules above? It's respectful, no personal attack, doesn'r reference employees by name, no offensive terms, no vulgar language, it's not spam, etc.

Nice blog, U. S. Government Agency...censoring posts because you disagree with the *content*.

Anonymous said...

This is just more "conditioning" by our government. The "Patriot Act" is the biggest travesty to our country and to it's citizens, and now this? Unnecessary, unreliable scanning filled with false positives--and worse--false negatives. This has nothing to do with security. This is just the beginning my fellow Americans. We are being conditioned slowly, but surely to accept more and more of this invasion of privacy and relinquishing of freedoms in the name of our "safety" -- a pathetic excuse. This goes beyond partisan lines. This one specific issue isn't too concerning, but when you add up each injustice and blantant disregard to our Constitution, it's very concerning. One day soon, we will wake up and remember the freedoms we used to have and wonder when we lost them. We will wonder how we lost them. This needs to be stopped.

And to those of you complaining about women and children being subjected to these searches too, and your surprise, I'm sick of it. We are all human beings (including men) and we are all being raped of our privacy, no matter your height, weight, race, age, or gender.

skinnies_eats said...

A lot of people seem to be very frustrated with the pat downs.

I've opted out of the AIT and had a pat down. Now, while I disagree with pat-downs, I have to throw my two cents in and say it was done extremely professionally.

I was told what was going to happen before the pat-down began. At each phase I was told what would be touched, and how it would be touched (palms for one area, back-of-the-hand for another).

Anonymous said...

I will be flying Dec 2 out of Dallas and I will be wearing my bikini through the security checkpoint. I would rather have at least a bit of decency from the covering of my two piece bathing suit than a naked x-ray of me or to go through the sexual assault of a pat down.

Anonymous said...

I prefer having men with machine guns and dogs around than having people touch my genitals. And there have been multiple descriptions of the pat downs which include touching genitals and putting hands inside waist bands.

Anonymous said...

I intend to never fly again, but if by some circumstance I must I will file rape (if they attempt genital contact) and assault charges against any TSA employee attempting an invasive search. You have to wonder if the TSA will now become a mass transmitter of STD's.

Anonymous said...

And, let’s not forget that former homeland security secretary Michael Chertoff is the founder of the Chertoff Group, a security consulting firm whose clients include manufacturers of full-body scanners.

“Mr. Chertoff should not be allowed to abuse the trust the public has placed in him as a former public servant to privately gain from the sale of full-body scanners,’’ opined Kate Hanni, founder of FlyersRights.org, which opposes use of the scanners.

Chertoff’s group represents Rapiscan, a California based firm “which until recently was the only company qualified to sell full-body scan machines to the TSA.” Last summer, “TSA purchased 150 machines from Rapiscan with $25 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds.”

A better name might be RapeScan.

Anonymous said...

Ok lets take a long look at this scenario.
Wait it can be summed up in a few words. If our friendly terrorist is able to plant a bomb on the plane because we let our guard down all of you that commenetd bashing the TSA will then bash them for allowing it to happen. Until we grow up and sop killing ..all measures should be taken to ensure you have a safe flight. I was in aruba and volunteered to be patted down after a very suspicious person that bought a one way ticket and dressed as if homeless created such a scene. Yes i stereotyped but was glad they conducted the patdown

RB said...

Marie in part said......

The pat down is a noninvasive pat down that slides the palms of the hand over nonsensitive areas and the back of the hand over sensitive areas such as between and under the breast (NEVER cupping), where the leg meets the torso (not between this area as some mistakenly believe), and along the waist band (NOT REACHING IN like someone here believes).
Or, we could just do as the Germans

.........................
Marie that area you call the torso is actually a persons crotch. Numerous reports of TSA screeners groping peoples penises and vulva's have been reported.

You call this noninvasive?

Let me stick my hands between your legs, up into your crotch, and you tell me that was not invasive.

Also a large number of people have also reported that TSA screeners are putting their hands inside peoples clothing at the waist band and feeling inside down towards the public area.

You also call that noninvasive?

As far as calling up the Germans you TSA people are mimicking those people just fine.

RB said...

kate said...
I forgot to mention, in the prison system, pat downs are being done by
officers of a different gender, it's not convenient to wait for it to be done by someone of the same gender.

November 15, 2010 12:49 PM

.............
Kate seems to be an excellent TSA employee. Treat citizens who have done nothing more than buy a plane ticket like criminals.

Good job TSA!

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Has anyone suggested/considered employing medical professionals to perform the groin and breast exams?

November 15, 2010 2:35 PM

...........
TSA finds its new hires by advertising on pizza boxes and gas pumps.

Medical professionals are found by other means.

Anonymous said...

Pat downs by same gendered officers? Really? What about transgendered, transvestite and/or hermaphrodites? What about passengers from faiths with orthodox practices that are not allowed to be touched by any person besides a spouse or physician? Some religions do not allow one to be touched by anyone other than a spouse or doctor? How will TSA address these sensitive issues?

Anonymous said...

I am a frequent flyer, however I think that we as Americans should opt out of flying and make the trip in a vehicle, RV, etc if possible and lets see if the airlines will then step in as they lose money from their loyal travelers.

jb said...

I have serious doubts concerning the efficacy of this blog

Blogger Bob writes elsewhere "I don’t answer loaded questions RB, and will continue to discourage such posting"

Why then does he/TSA not respond to clear requests for information on issues that affect a significant number of travellers?

My post of November 13, 2010 4:54 AM in this thread is an example.

Why does he/TSA not respond to a proposal that would resolve the issue of what defines a "standard size laptop"?

My post of November 11, 2010 4:53 AM in the MacBook Air thread is another example.

If TSA management intends this blog to be a serious interaction with the travelling public, they should assign full-time staff to analyse post content, respond to aggregated concerns and answer serious posts.

Blogger Bob's administrative role appears to be limited to approving posts and posting policy statements on an irregular schedule.

It's not enough.

Junior Aviation Student. said...

The TSA is Bull I say we all Boycott FLY!!! and then they will change there policies if everyone elects not the fly

Junior Aviation Student. said...

Abuse of Power and using peoples fears as a excuse to enforce. the government has far over step their boundaries and I will not support a President that allows this and sit by subduedly and say nothing. And I don't care about him being black, I'm black but not simple minded

Anonymous said...

I have the following questions regarding TSA's enhanced security procedures:
(1) What has the report card been for the last round of random security tests? My understanding is that the last few random tests have shown that the overwhelming majority of airport screening was still failing to find mock bombs which were placed in carry-on luggage, including when the luggage was hand searched. I believe the reported figures were in the 90%+ failure rate. Have there been improvements in your score?
(2) Are you aware that federal prisoners are searched in a fashion similar to the one outlined by your procedures, and that police officers, even with just cause, are not allowed to perform these procedures except for "pocket" searches when accompanied by another officer or with video evidence? Are you taping the physical searches on video, and if so, what happens to the video afterwards?
(3) Why is the presumption of innocence and the right to privacy of passengers being placed below the need for security in the case of airline travel? Is it not true that all recent terrorist activity has not revolved around airports and aircraft, and that instead other targets have been hit (trains, cars, etc)?
(4) What is the manual labor cost of your increased security measures, and does the ongoing and recurring cost outweigh the perceived benefits, both immediate and long term?

Anonymous said...

Safety is of greater concern than pat-down whining.

Al

Anonymous said...

I definitely don't want a guy touching my junk...hot blondes are fine

Anonymous said...

On November 5 at about 12pm I went through the full body scanner at the Boise airport. The security personnel were extremely unprofessional. They were laughing and joking about the images they were seeing.

Craig said...

Since when is flying a "right", instead of a "privelege"? If you don't like it, take a bus!!! Considering the alternative of not having passengers thorougly screened, this is truly nothing more than an minor inconvenience. The ones complaining will be be the 1st ones to beat their chests and point their fingers when the wrong passenger slips through..

Anonymous said...

How would any of these illegal invasive procedures have prevented 9/11?

Oh, they wouldn't have...sheep keep letting them take your freedom away!

LTSO with Answers said...

@Jobeth66

@LTSO with Answers, posting on 11/14 at 6:18 pm, you said with regard to photography/filming This will vary from location to location if you are able to or not.

That should NOT be the case. For any searching being done in public there should be no expectation of privacy, and if the TSA can film this, I can certainly film it. There should also not be ANY question of 'location to location'. The TSA is a FEDERAL organization. Rules and guidelines should be seamless regardless of location, and the traveling public should know what the rules are, at all times. With regard to recording in private, that may be a stickier situation depending on location. In a single-party state, as long as I consent to the filming, then whether the TSA consents or not is irrelevant. If in a dual-party state, that may be different. But anything that takes place in the public eye is public should be able to be legally filmed or photographed.


Forgive me I should be more specific. TSA does not prohibit the public from photographing or videotaping screening locations unless you interfere with the screening process. Local law and ordinances may effect if you are allowed to photograph or videotape a screening location which is why it varies from location to location. This ofcoarse will be enforced by local authorities but could be referred by TSA.

OB1 said...

The TSA has addressed this issue incorrectly. This security issue is more of a wardrobe suggestion problem than privacy problem.

Solution -- The TSA should suggest folks wear a body tight speedo, bikini or skin tight jeans and top to match to the airport, and the problem goes away with a quick glance. Wear something else, and you're rolling the dice to get searched... Tight fitting wardrobes might make standing in the TSA line at the airport more interesting, assuming you're not in some rotund sagging senior vacation express line.

Hmmm, perhaps this later problem could be covered with a trench coat -- soon to be repackaged as a TSA Flash coat? :)

So, in summary, this is really a wardrobe problem, plus a sagging overweight American traveler problem, more than a privacy problem. The TSA just doesn't hasn't been properly addressing this issue.

jim said...

we just went to ireland and back via germany airport security was great the only person given a thorough search was my wife we made it a funny situation rather than a bad one i asked them if they would do that to me too if you don't like the rules take a boat or a bus stay off the planes they don't deserve you. you people don't realize our way of life is being threatened by people that don't think like us they want to harm you. what they should do for all of you that are offended is to have two planes one for people who are searched fares will be a little higher and the other for all the offended ones low fares easy access see how that goes for you. my family and I had no problem with security probably because we respect what they are doing. its alot like when you pulled over for a traffic violation how do you handle that are you polite or aggrevated by their action's. when it's your world and everyone else is just living in it, that makes it a lot harder.

Hank said...

I think every Judge from local to the Supreme Court, every Employee of TSA from the the lowest person to the highest office and their spouse and kids over 18 years old should have to go through the "pat down" then lets see if they still agree with the procedure. Body Scans and pat downs can not be down on minors because of child molesting and pornogophy laws. So why are they being done on adults. I for one will not fly until this goes away. People who think this is right, needs to take their spouse and kids and have the TSA agents pat them down and lets see if that changes their mind.

Anonymous said...

As a male, I do not want another male anywhere near my private areas. Like you care anyway...

Anonymous said...

Last week on my trip to Orlando from Providence I was "body scanned" in Providence - absolutely no big deal.....and "patted down" because of a knee replacement in Orlando - AGAIN, NO BIG DEAL!!! What is wrong with you people - it's not like you have to take off your clothes - I'm sure the TSA agents aren't enjoying seeing most of the bodies anyhow. You also have the option of being "patted" in a private room or out in the open - I chose the open, because, really, it wasn't any big deal!!! Grow up you people - I'd rather be patted down than blown up any day...

Anonymous said...

On last trip to Orlando from Providence (just returned yesterday) was scanned in Providence and patted down in Orlando on return flight. Neither was a big deal at all!!! - didn't even go in available private room for pat down - grow up people. I'd rather be patted down than blown up any day!!! If you think these agents just LOVE to look or touch people with the bodies most of us have you're sadly mistaken.

Vickybabymama said...

I will be traveling with my 3-month old baby girl. She will be in a baby carrier, not a stroller. Will she be subject to this pat-down as well? Will I have to remove her diaper? May I ask the TSA officer to change gloves?

Phil801 said...

Just curious, which illegal aliens crossing the borders are getting pat downs and invasive x-rays? American Citizens are being treated like criminals for spending our money while criminals crossing the border are being protected to take our money.

Something is wrong in the state of America!

Anonymous said...

Really? Nothing punitive? Then why do you agents use it as a threat?
When I've questioned a TSA Procedure previously, the comment to me was "Maybe you'd prefer to be hand searched?"
You people are underqualified and overpowered.

Anonymous said...

I'm so very tired of this cry baby society we live in. If you have a problem here then I sugest you go to the source and confront your elected leaders who are trying to keep you safe, you can thank the terrorists for having to go through screenings. The world we live in today does not let us put our guard down, - you guys asked for this freedom in this country to let anyone and everyone in and let them do their own thing - well some of their own thing is to kill you. I suggest you let the TSO's do their jobs or take an alternative transportation, but quit your crying boohoo. This country used to be proud now its a bunch of people who do nothing but blame all their problems on the other guy and cry. The TSO's don't make the rules they are just doing their jobs cut them some slack. It would serve you all right if they all walked off and let you all fly completely unprotected for awhile and see how long you stay in the air. Yell at your congressmen, yell at the terrorists, but put the blame where it belongs. The TSO's dont generally think your such a catch and they really don't enjoy touching you any more than you do. Get real.

Anonymous said...

I think most of the comments are out of line. I can tell you I would rather go thru a screen or have a pat down then be on a plane with a bomb on it. Believe me, I don't enjoy these extras steps, but if it makes it so I am safe then lets get it done. Quit complaining and stay off the planes if you don't want to follow these safety measures.

Sommer Gentry said...

The enhanced patdowns obviously have nothing to do with security because TSA allows millions of people to fly without going through EITHER the strip-search scanner OR the enhanced patdown. You just have to choose a security lane with a standard magnetometer. The TSA's motives are totally transparent - to bully passengers into accepting a dose of radiation while posing for nude photos.

Anonymous said...

I am a pregnant woman. I have been advised not to go through the backscatter device by my physician. I will have to submit to your "enhanced" (for whom?) pat down when I travel this holiday season. I would like to know what to expect before I get to the airport because I have heard that if at any point I decide I'd rather not continue with the pat down, I'll be subject to criminal penalties. TRANSPARENCY please. I have to decide if I'm traveling anymore or not.

It's only a matter of time now before this will stop. Hopefully before the holidays. It will be found to be an unreasonable search without probable cause that also unreasonably restricts my fundemental constitutional right to interstate travel.

Anonymous said...

I am a female, 23 years old, and have been a victim of sexual assault. I am also a student studying social work. Victims of assault or molestation– myself included– have to rebuild trust in strangers, and get to a point where they feel they have control over their body.

When I heard about the new TSA measures, I knew that I would not be comfortable with either.
In the name of preserving "safety" through disgustingly invasive security procedures, The TSA has taken away my ability to travel by air, because I no longer feel safe doing so. Irony?

Unless they change, I don't know how I can possibly hop on a plane to intern abroad next year. That opportunity doesn't feel real anymore, because I can't imagine going through this en route there or home. I can't and I won't. And it makes me feel powerless.

Anonymous said...

Perhaps these new screening measures - removing your shoes, minimizing liquids, invasive body scans or physical searchers - are all part of a new US strategy against terrorism.

That is, maybe the US government has finally acknowledged that the "war on terrorism" cannot realistically be won. However, rather than lose face domestically and internationally by admitting that all the measures that authorities have introduced since 9/11 don't work, the government has decided to pursue another strategy focused on implementing ridiculous, unconstitutional policies to stop Americans (and international travellers) from flying in the US.

I mean, if no one flies, no one can get hurt - right?!? It's like intercourse...the only 100% effective way to prevent pregnancy is abstinence. If the US government wants to guarantee that no more American lives will be lost due to domestic airline terrorism, it only needs to force us to abstain from flying!



I, for one, have already begun to abstain, and I will continue to refuse to fly to or within the US until such a time as these absurd measures are fully repealed.

Anonymous said...

I don't understand why a big deal is being made of this. Do you say the same thing when you are stark naked in front of your doctors office staff at a physical exam? No, I bet. The problem with this country nowadays is that its become the norm to make a big deal of everything.

Jeff said...

Anonymous said...
Look Mr. Anonymous are you to scared to tell people your real name?

Really?

Anonymous said...

Same sex does not equal "more comfortable." I've been patted down by a female TSA work and I can definitely tell you I did not feel comfortable AT ALL.

Anonymous said...

TSA Officials are not given powers of arrest or the same training as a Police Officer or someone who is a sworn federal law enforcement officer so therefore they do not have a right to conduct an illegal search of a person without probable cause. This is clearly a violation of our 4th amendment rights.

Your attempt to mitigate terrorists from utilizing airports as a mode of transportation will only make them use other means which we clearly do not have the man power to patrol. As a citizen of the United States I have constitutional rights and you are clearly violating my 4th amendment because you have not reason to search me other than I was randomly selected.

Anonymous said...

Do they change gloves after every pat down? If not, why not? The gloves protect them from our germs or whatever. So what protects us from what's on their gloves?

Anonymous said...

"Why doesn’t TSA use bomb sniffing dogs just as law enforcement does?"

Because it just makes too much sense. And former TSA Head / Nude-O-Scope 'consultant' Michael Chertoff wouldn't get paid millions.

Here's the problem with the Nude-O-Scope and the patdowns: eventually, someone's going to bring down a plane with a bomb concealed in their stomach or rectum. I'm sure the response will then be a call for mandatory pre-flight CT scans and cavity searches. Can't wait.

Anonymous said...

Why do TSA "officers" go behind a lead wall when giving these scans. If they are harmless, then why?

Anonymous said...

Are there any negative side effects for pregnant women who use the scanners? While I do not have a medical degree, I'd think that it would be harmful for a developing fetus or even a small child. Are there warnings on the machines so women who are not as well informed, don't get scanned?

Anonymous said...

Can the new high tech scanners detect a solid glass object (glass container and top) with liquid explosives in it when placed in one's body cavity? If they can not how would a pat down detect this?

Glenn said...

"The AIT machines are totally safe" Isn't that what they told the Tuskeegee Airmen? The soldiers attached to the Manhattan Project?

Anonymous said...

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."
Does this apply in the USA?

Anonymous said...

I just viewed Mr. Pistol of TSA tell a Congress member that he would NOT change any of the new policies of pat downs or xray scanners. I also saw a video of Capt.Sullenburger, who said pilots are exposed to much more radiation in the skies, and radiation is cumulative in everyone (we all know this). He stated that the pilot assn has some good ideas for securing safe airline travel without such invasive procedures; so, why won't TSA meet with the pilots and Capt. Sullenburger to discuss? I was fine with the previous procedures, but I will not fly with the current regulations, and I have to ask; what will this do to the airline industry's business?
Sassyncmrs

Anonymous said...

Blogger Bob, please post this link so people can see the pat down:

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_16643843

Anonymous said...

A friend of mine is flying next week and is pregnant so she will not go through the scanners. She has a one year old daughter. I told her not to worry that they won't pat down her daughter b/c she is under 12. She called TSA, and they said that they won't touch her daughter's genital areas, but they will pat her down. Talk about overkill.

Anonymous said...

This debate is silly. What is the point of having these "enhanced" procedures and scans if they cannot detect even the simplest of countermeasures (explosive suppositories).
There is no answer as to a viable alternative, because NOTHING can keep everybody safe at all times, despite what the government thinks. If you are still going to be in 1000 times as much danger driving to the airport as you are on the airplane, why bother with the expense, privacy concerns, and health concerns?

Anonymous said...

If the intrusive TSA patdowns and/or body scans offend you, let your Congressional representatives know. We can't abolish TSA on their own blog.

Anonymous said...

I think the TSA needs to take a hint from Thomas Jefferson when he said, "Those who surrender freedom for security will not have, nor do they deserve, either one."

I find the prospect of being required to either have an image of my naked body viewed by the government or be subjected to an "enhanced" pat down (details of which are not provided by the TSA) an infringement on my rights as a human being.

I find it a horrifying reality that my country now requires randomly selected individuals to relinquish their dignity and modesty in the name of security.

It is absolutely a disgrace to the freedom and privacy that Americans are promised with the privilege of citizenship that their body now becomes a vessel to be searched without reasonable suspicion.

I will never fly domestically until these measured are altered. The only flights I will make are international ones where there is no other relevant option to reach my destination.

I now face the prospect of flying over the Christmas holidays with great anxiety. I will not relinquish my airline ticket because of these measures because there is no other option in reaching my final destination. Although, I do believe that surrendering my freedom in the name of national security a disgraceful reality that disturbs me to no end.

Daryl said...

I just watched Mr. Pistole's performance--there's no other word for it--before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. I was struck by his statement that he could only describe the new pat-down procedures in secret, closed-door session, so the terrorists don't find out how it's done and figure out how to defeat it. Really?

Anyone who has graduated from police academy knows how to do a pat-down (I'm surprised that Mr. Pistole, a former FBI agent, apparently never experienced one as part of his training). Anyone who ever has been booked into jail knows how a pat-down is done. Anyone who declines the AIT quickly learns, under penalty of an $11,000 fine, how a pat-down is done. So what's the Big National Security Secret here?

G. M. Atwater said...

I'm curious what happens with smaller airports like Reno, Nevada, which lack the AIT scanning technology. They just have the same old X-ray machines and hand-held wands. Since the scanning machines aren't there, pat-downs must then be the mandatory alternative, right?

So, everyone going through RNO and airports like it are subject to these pat-downs, since their technology isn't up to day.

Happy day.

Your Aunt Fanny said...

I have difficulty standing, pain in my hips & back, and nerve damage on my back and legs. I wear large pads for bladder leakage. Will my pads cause me to be pulled out of the nude scanner and given the full pat-down? Am I going to have to explain this embarrassing situation every time I fly now? Am I also going to have to explain that I can't stand for my hips or back to be touched, and that the big rolls all over my thighs and abdomen are actually my fat? Am I going to have to lift my breasts so that a complete stranger can feel under them?

I have never been arrested or searched like this before. I am not subjected to this kind of humiliation or invasion of privacy even at a doctor's visit. I also don't believe that giving up my dignity and emotional well-being will serve any purpose whatsoever. I don't believe this will make any of us any safer, but it will make millions of us absolutely hate to travel.

Anonymous said...

The enhanced pat-down is punitive and intended to utilize human behavioral change management techniques to increase speed of adoption without making it mandatory, thus preserving the perception of "rights" through appliation of incrementalism. Media will be used to promulgate repetitive assurances, while risk and severity of threats are not significantly diminshed. Those continuing to support the scans and enhanced pat downs have simply not reached their "break point", which differs among a given population demographic. TSA has, in fact, been testing population response more than security to determine maximum possible invasiveness of search vs. refusal to submit to search or refusal to travel. These statistics are gathered and monitored. To illustrate, if TSA were to apply anal probing to all passengers indiscriminately, all air travel would cease. That would exceed the "break point" of even the most supportive traveller. My break point was exceeded many years ago, but alas must travel for business.

Anonymous said...

I have concerns regarding the safety of the scanning machines being used at different US airports.I urge President Obama and the TSA to take action by responding to the letter sent to him by the group of scientist that raised their concerns regarding the new body scanning machines. believe that these scanners will increase the risk of cancer to children and other vulnerable populations.

David Brenner, director of Columbia University's Center for Radiological Research, has also voiced caution about x-raying millions of air travelers. He was a member of the government committee that set the safety guidelines for the x-ray scanners, and he now says he would not have signed onto the report had he known that TSA wanted to scan almost every air traveler".

Most important, I have not found yeat any information that includes a DETAILED explanation on how the opt-out hand screening takes place and what exactly supposes to be done and how long this lasts.
We deserve to know ahead of time what is exactly happening and how the proceedure and its implications so we, as parents, decide and talk to our children too. It is simply mentioned that children under 12 will have a modified hand screnning done...and yes, could you explain in detail what this means? Still not comfortable with the generic talk and nothing about how this is really done.
Moreover, our children and young people (still legally consider children) How do you expect that our children are going to react to somebody they do not know touching them? As parents we spend years protecting our children, telling them not to allow anybody to touch them innaproprietly, this includes their genital area, will the above 12 be subject to this too? Do you expect a responsible parent to allow TSA to touch our children all over and just keep quiet? There is something really wrong about this.

How do you think children feel? Do you expect a responsible parent letting a TSA employee touch all over a pre-teen or teen? Even if they wer of the same gender, does that make it better? Not at all. How do you think our pre-teens and teen will feel? Has anybody speak out on behalf our our children? Do you think that a 13-18 year old feels? Do you undertand how adults feel about this too? What about females? What happens when they are menstruating and have a pad or a tampon in??
It is terrible! There are no public guidelines openly spoken to the public. INFORMATION is what we all need.
This matter is of extreme importance to many families. The body scanner is not an option as long as the health risks are openly discussed by a panel of experts and the conversation open to the public. Having our children feel safe is important too, and we will not due our duty if we just sit and let them be touch by a complete stranger. Any rational on this? Does anybody care about potential psicological damage to our children? A 13-21...are not they still consider children too? Do you understand how they feel? Yes, young pre-teen boys and girls, young teenage boys and girls. I find all of this a perversion.

I appreciate this space to vent out our concerns, however please consider this is not enough. We need proactive action and we really need to have all this openly addressed with all the parties involved. This is America and this new technological body scanning or the touch scanning option are not options at all.
THERE IS A NEED TO SPEAK THIS OUT TO THE PUBLIC. THERE IS NO INFORMATION AT ALL AVAILABLE FOR FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN, PLEASE RESPOND ASAP, THE HIGH TRAVEL SEASON IS HERE ALREADY!

Anonymous said...

I have concerns regarding the safety of the scanning machines being used at different US airports.

David Brenner, director of Columbia University's Center for Radiological Research, has also voiced caution about x-raying millions of air travelers. He was a member of the government committee that set the safety guidelines for the x-ray scanners, and he now says he would not have signed onto the report had he known that TSA wanted to scan almost every air traveler".

Most important, I have not found yeat any information that includes a DETAILED explanation on how the opt-out hand screening takes place and what exactly supposes to be done and how long this lasts.
We deserve to know ahead of time what is exactly happening and how the proceedure and its implications so we, as parents, decide and talk to our children too. It is simply mentioned that children under 12 will have a modified hand screnning done...and yes, could you explain in detail what this means? Still not comfortable with the generic talk and nothing about how this is really done.
Moreover, our children and young people (still legally consider children) How do you expect that our children are going to react to somebody they do not know touching them? As parents we spend years protecting our children, telling them not to allow anybody to touch them innaproprietly, this includes their genital area, will the above 12 be subject to this too? Do you expect a responsible parent to allow TSA to touch our children all over and just keep quiet? There is something really wrong about this.

How do you think children feel? Do you expect a responsible parent letting a TSA employee touch all over a pre-teen or teen? Even if they wer of the same gender, does that make it better? Not at all. How do you think our pre-teens and teen will feel? Has anybody speak out on behalf our our children? Do you think that a 13-18 year old feels? Do you undertand how adults feel about this too? What about females? What happens when they are menstruating and have a pad or a tampon in??
It is terrible! There are no public guidelines openly spoken to the public. INFORMATION is what we all need.
This matter is of extreme importance to many families. The body scanner is not an option as long as the health risks are openly discussed by a panel of experts and the conversation open to the public. Having our children feel safe is important too, and we will not due our duty if we just sit and let them be touch by a complete stranger. Any rational on this? Does anybody care about potential psicological damage to our children? A 13-21...are not they still consider children too? Do you understand how they feel? Yes, young pre-teen boys and girls, young teenage boys and girls. I find all of this a perversion.

I appreciate this space to vent out our concerns, however please consider this is not enough. We need proactive action and we really need to have all this openly addressed with all the parties involved. This is America and this new technological body scanning or the touch scanning option are not options at all.
THERE IS A NEED TO SPEAK THIS OUT TO THE PUBLIC. THERE IS NO INFORMATION AT ALL AVAILABLE FOR FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN, PLEASE RESPOND ASAP, THE HIGH TRAVEL SEASON IS HERE ALREADY!

Anonymous said...

Hello:

I got this from my representative:




Thank you for taking the time to contact me with your views on aviation security. In order to best represent you as your United States Senator, it is vital that I hear your views on this and other important matters.



The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) plays a critical role in securing our aviation system. I understand your concerns with both full body scanners and pat down searches, and I believe that there must be a proper balance between security and privacy of passengers.



In the wake of the recent foiled terrorist plots, TSA has tightened their screening process in order to keep the traveling public safe in the air. In response to complaints about the new screening process, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano announced on Monday, November 15, 2010 that TSA will review its procedures and will make adjustments where appropriate. I will continue to monitor the situation to ensure that TSA makes the necessary adjustments and that passengers are treated with dignity during the screening process.


Again, thanks for writing. Should you have any specific questions regarding TSA procedure, please visit its website at: www.tsa.gov. As we move forward in the 111th Congress, please continue to be in touch with your opinions.

Anonymous said...

Nothing will ever be perfect regarding how terrorism is thwarted. There will always be circumstances that make the pat down an uncomfortable situation for a minute percentage of travelors. As for me, male age 61, I prefer leaning towards more security effort rather than less.

Anonymous said...

*Sigh* This is wrong on so many levels. How can anyone with half a shred of human dignity not see this?

At the very very very minimum, can we please make TSA agents required to adhere to existing policies regarding people's health information? In some cases, in order to make it through screening, people have to disclose sensitive, sometimes embarrassing medical conditions to TSA workers who are not doctors and who are not covered under HIPPA.

Sadly, I'm afraid some TSA workers are so poorly educated (I'm not talking about poorly trained. I mean, they just don't know enough about the world in general), that they would not understand common medical conditions or any of the accommodations necessary for people living with them. :(

Anonymous said...

" weapons and other dangerous and prohibited items we’ve found"

What does "other dangerous and prohibited items" even mean? Nail clippers and water bottles?

Anonymous said...

I think that we should start a 'boycott' on airlines that use the TSA for security purposes. Airlines in Florida are paying private companies less to do the same thing, only better than TSA. They believe the customer is the one that pays the bills and they don't want to piss them off. I think it's outrageous to trust someone to search a flier, especially if they have been complained about. It should not even come into consideration that a prostethic breast should be removed in front of other people. That is already something that is personal and embarrassing to that person and no pinheaded little TSA agent should have the gauld to ask. WHO DO YOU PEOPLE THINK YOU ARE?

Anonymous said...

rob said:
After paying hundreds, maybe thousands, of dollars for a ticket, one must be treated like a criminal and have his dignity and right to privacy violated. And if one protests? Bullying. Threats. Is this really what has become of our country? I'd be ashamed of myself if I worked for the TSA.
you have to seperate the airlines and security. the airlines are a business what you pay for your ticket is what you pay, it has nothing to do with security. if you are willing to pay thousands for air travel look into a private aircraft. there are ways around this if you want to fly, search them out. dont forget that the govt has bailed out the airlines too. you have the option of going through or not. you are aware of what might happen when going through so be prepared. i would prefer that everyone was to go through the machines so that all of this im being singled out stuff will end. i want my family to be safe, what ever it takes, its my choice to go through and its yours too...

Anonymous said...

Im still trying to find out where the 4th Amendment is being taken away. you are the one that is subjecting yourself to the adminstative search by getting in line to go through the screening area so you are consenting to the search. its not like the tsa is coming to your house and doing this to you. when you get in line you are saying that you will go through whatever search is needed to get to your plane. you have the power, the power to go through the screening area or the power not too. plain and simple. if you dont want to be patted down then dont go through the checkpoint. eventually as the technology gets better everyone will have to be scanned so again you have the power. if you want to use a commercial airplane then this is what you will have to do.

Anonymous said...

anon said:
I was in LAX last week and experienced the new x-ray screening. It was my first time and I was completely at unprepared and at shock with the new procedure. Nobody with TSA made an announcement in the line about this new procedure they just forced me through and not knowing I couldn't have ANYTHING including my non-metal wallet in my pockets or a belt and watch that I always wear through security with no problem...I ended up having to put all of my belongings into about 8 different bins making me very uncomfortable. Then I was told to stand with my hands up...not knowing what the heck was going on. And when I said I felt uncomfortable with all of this, I was subjected to extra screening where I got a very thorough pat-down.

TSA you need to inform the public of these actions and new screening requirements so we know what to expect. This was a public information FAIL.

did you look around for any signs? i didnt see in your statement if you noticed any or not. alot of bloggers on here have been quite upset about tsa screeners shouting at people as to what to do so this time it doesnt happen and its wrong. so its a lose/lose tsa. i feel for you...

Anonymous said...

anon said:
"My 16 year old son left $20 in his golf bag. Funny thing it disapeared after a TSA screener left the notice in his bag. I realize he should not have left money in his golf bag but 16 year olds don't think."

perhaps seeing as how he doesnt think he forgot where he put it? how do you know it was the tsa that took your sons money? what is your proof? anytime the tsa goes in your bag they have to put in a notice, its to let you know that they were in there, not to let you know that they stole from you. again, a lose/lose situation

Anonymous said...

With some experience in law enforcement, your "enhanced pat-downs" as reported seem to go beyond techniques normally employed. I would like to see the training manual and how TSA agents are specifically taught 'enhanced pat-downs".

Parker said...

There is no evidence that either your "enhanced" pat-downs or "virtual nudity" scans make flight safer. You have definitely made it less comfortable, less convenient, and more often humiliating, but not demonstrable safer.

What's more, by radiating everyone a little bit, how many cancers are you causing?

At least I drive or take the train whenever possible--Hertz and Amtrak thank you for the extra business, by the way--and since you seem to assume that all Americans are guilty of carrying explosives, weapons, and incendiaries both in our carry-ons and in our underpants until "proven" innocent by your unsubstantiated methods, maybe that has made flying ever-so-slightly safer.

Andrew said...

Why do I have to patted down by someone of the same gender? Shouldn't I be given a choice? I pay for the screeners to be there in the first place. I could care less about the pat down if I get a little choice in the matter...

Anonymous said...

My family and I will not be flying as long as these outrageous "pat downs" and porno machines are being used.

Jeanne said...

The pat-down was inappropriately intrusive. I travel every week for business and was somehow singled out at LAX for AIT. Because of a damaged shoulder I could not raise my arm high enough for their satisfaction and was literally pushed without explanation to a waiting woman who started groping me. I felt raped.

This process is seriously flawed, from looking at who undergoes further scrutiny to communications during the process. And for TSA to say the number of complaints is low is a cop-out. Many people are given no chance to complain as no one would answer my questions during the process, I heard other travelers being told, "if you don't do this you cannot fly", and a lack of ways for people to submit complaints.

How about a simple push button voting option at the exit of the security line to say, "Did you enjoy your experience with TSA?" That would get you actual feedback.

Anonymous said...

It is amazing how the TSA states that a recent study show that 4 out of 5 people surveyed actually support full-body airport scanners, but 95% of the comments here are unhappy about the new enhanced security (interrogation) procedures. We all need to quit wasting our time going after the TSA and start going after the airlines for allowing this to take place. The only real power in this country comes from corporations, so that is who we should go after. If the airlines start complaining about lost profits as a result of the new TSA procedures, you better believe things will change.

Anonymous said...

I think a class action sexual discrimination lawsuit is called for. Why is a man feeling my nuggies? The procedure smacks of sexual discrimination.

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