Friday, November 19, 2010

Airports Who Opt out of TSA Screening are Still Regulated by TSA

Passenger JetThere has been a lot of confusion after a recent report that the Orlando Sanford Airport (SFB) has requested to opt out of TSA screening.

Any commercial airport can apply to TSA’s Screening Partnership Program (SPP), which has been around since the inception of TSA.  After approval from TSA and a competitive bidding process, SPP allows airports to transition to private screeners while maintaining TSA oversight and the corresponding increased level of security implemented since 9/11.

So… if an airport applies and is accepted into the SPP program, they receive the same screening from a private company instead of TSA officers. That’s the only difference. All commercial airports are regulated by TSA whether the actual screening is performed by TSA or private companies. So TSA’s policies – including advanced imaging technology and pat downs – are in place at all domestic airports.

If you’ve flown out of one of these airports, you’ve experienced privatized screening from an SPP airport.

Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County Airport (STS); Dawson Community Airport (GDV); Frank Wiley Field (MLS); Greater Rochester International (ROC); Havre City County Airport (HVR); Jackson Hole (JAC); Joe Foss Field (FSD); Kansas City International (MCI); Key West International Airport (EYW); L.M. Clayton Airport (OLF); Lewistown Municipal Airport (LWT); Roswell International Air Center (ROW); San Francisco International (SFO); Sidney Richland Regional (SDY); Tupelo Regional (TUP); Wokal Field (GGW)


Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

126 comments:

  1. Wow Bob. You have time to write more drivel, but not enough time to post comments?

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  2. If the management of a substantial number of major airports register their disgust with the TSA by dropping TSA personnel and replacing them with contractors, the TSA's procedures will become politically untenable against the tide of an anger that demonstrates widespread public contempt for your agency. It's you who "misunderstand."

    If airports opt out of TSA staffing, it will be a vote of no confidence in the agency, and the agency will either not survive or not survive in its current form. As usual, this oh, but we'll still be in charge argument misses most of the points that you can't afford to miss.

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  3. Come on Bob, you want to be taken seriously, but so many of your myth busters are obviously wrong or missed the point. 1. You point to some CBS poll were 80% ore okay with it, ignoring other polls, ignoring the circumstances of the poll. If you want to offer a real poll, ask 1000 people after putting them through the scanner and allowing them to see the pictures produced, or those going through the pat downs, how they feel. This is the only poll that matters. 2. You treat the public like criminals, but TSA employees are given an honor system. You ask them not to take cell phones, record images, etc... Are you saying you serach TSA employees before they go into the scanner viewing room? No, you trust them not to take pictures. Let's strip search them to be sure, that would make me feel better. 3. John Hopkins comes out and says how they never said it was safe, but just measured radiation levels, not a medical study about frequent fliers, pilots, misused or malfunctioning equipment. Ae these machines tested daily to ensure they are not giving off more radiation? Skin cancer? 4. You site a 2003 case to support a $11,000 fine, even though the court agrees with you because the invasive search was NOT the primary search, but was done with reasonable cause. This did not even concern Full body scanners or pat down invasion issues.
    So stop spinning the issues, realize what you finally did for pilots and children, you are not going to get away with this. Tell your buddy Chertoff to cancel the remaining orders.

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  4. I think hell froze over; this post appears to be 100% correct.

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  5. You don't seem to get it. We hate the TSA. We want the TSA to employ less people to reduce its power. Yes, we are currently stuck by law with your regulation. But, a first step to get out of the fascist grasp of the TSA is to eliminate as many TSA employees as possible. The next step will be to have the TSA eliminated entirely.

    Personally I am quite overjoyed that the TSA is behaving illegally on a mass scale (rather than just in isolated incidents, which is much harder to complain about). You've gone so far over the line, you have doomed yourselves. The TSA as we know it will not exist by the end of the decade.

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  6. Blogger Bob had a productive day. He found time to write one post about airports which opt out of the TSA-run screening (OPT OUT!!!! OPT OUT!!!!) but he didn't have time to moderate even one of the hundreds of posts that have likely been made comment on previous articles. Well, I guess one blog post is more efficiency than we could find reasonable to expect from a government organization like the TSA.

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  7. Thanks Bob, for getting out the word on the realities of airport screening by private companies. Dispelling the myth that private screening companies would somehow make everything easy and hassle free, might bring reality to the screening process that would be in effect at these non-TSA staffed airports. The news reports I saw this morning suggested that a private company could do it "differently". A pretty vague description that brings up visions of pass through express screening without the use of x-ray machines, millimeter wave, backscatter x-ray or pat-downs; an irresponsible representation of reality. As you say Bob, the process that will be required either way (i.e. SOP) will be the same. The "difference" will most likely be a return to "screeners" getting paid less, with fewer benefits and less job security. In other words, a pre-911workforce without a vested interest in "Homeland Security" and professional Officers who it could be argued are the most highly trained, tested and adaptable civilian workforce that presently exists.

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  8. Is it me or is the TSA putting on a full-court-press trying to overcome the recent backlash of negative publicity?

    Randy

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  9. It's unlikely the private companies will hire 350+ lbs individuals who sweat profusely and breathe heavily just from the strain of standing up.

    It's unlikely the private companies will tolerate rudeness, slacking and poor performance from their employees.

    It's unlikely the private companies will have one lane open and allow 15+ employees to loiter in the screening area, chatting amongst themselves, while passengers queue up.

    Why? Because they want the airport's business, and the airport wants to project a positive image.

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  10. Blogger Bob, thanks for helping out. Can you please let us all know the last actual bomb the TSA found at an airport security screening checkpoint?

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  11. The TSA ship is sinking by the bow.

    Few people believe or trust anything coming out of TSA.

    Gonna need a bigger bucket Bob!

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  12. We are Borg
    Your biological and technological distinctiveness will be added to our own.
    You will be Assimilated
    Resistance is Futile

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  13. the question your not asking is.. why are airports opting out of having TSA personal running secuity?

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  14.  Dear John Pistole and Janet Napolitano,
    As leaders, you have issued an unlawful order to your troops. As a veteran, this makes you fully responsible and them responsible for followig it. Those are the rules we have to follow in war zones defending the freedoms you are stripping from our family we have left in our care while we fight this war based on lies.
    You have issued an unlawful order, against the US Constitution. You both took the same oath I took to defend the Constitution and have abadoned it and that is an act of treason. Those troops under you following your orders will share your shame when you are prosecuted.
    TSA employees do not share the shame. When a soldier follows an unlawful order he is just as responsible as the commander issuing it, and disobeying that unlawful order is your duty
    Molesting, groping, improper touching of innocent people is not legal and we cannot do it in War Zones to innocent people, so why are you touching my wife and kids I left in your care? Thank you TSA for demoralizing the troops overseas and violating our families we left in your care.

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  15. I support Ron Paul's bill.

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  16. I am hoping that a future Congress completely ax's the TSA.

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  17. Still cost more to contract the screeners. TSA needs to get out of bed with the contractors. Who is screening the selection of their employees prior to employment/conducting screening. Isn't tis approach taking us back to decentralization of the past. Private industry works for profit. Their employees do not take an oath to protect the government like Feds do.

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  18. So . . . are these non-TSA employees employed by the federal government or is this one of those loopholes where airports get to hire the lowest-paid rent-a-cops they can find despite the post-9/11 promise that airport screeners would be federal employees?

    -danny

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  19. Well that's a relief- and there I was thinking I'd be "unsafe" if I went to one of those airports. Now I can rest easy knowing they all will exhibit the same illogical incompetence regardless of who is touching my crotch.

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  20. Actually, I have boarded many a plane bound for the USA in different countries without TSA madness. This means I fly over US territory without ever having to remove my shoes. And none of those flights went boom.

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  21. The majority of the flights that have had problems do originate or fly through Europe. I am by no means an advocate of the Kabuki security theatre now enacted by TSA as none of the procedures will stop terrorists but only harass innocent people people to the point of no longer flying. My recent harassment at LAX has resulted in limiting the times I fly to USA as well as cut back travel for my staff to USA. We can do business on the available conferencing tools available by internet now. TSA can continue to claim these new procedures and technology will increase security all they like but when people stop flying to the point of a drastic reduction in commercial aviation and the airlines do something because of these useless procedures only then will they listen.

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  22. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

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  23. Bob, Next time I fly I'm going to try smuggling something through security. I'm going to stick it down my pants. I will dress to ensure an "enhanced" pat down. When the TSA agent reaches down my pants, what he pulls out will shock him and the TSA. They will have caught me red handed trying to smuggle a copy of The Constitution through security!

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  24. A recent poll my a well known Minnesota news station had 74% objecting to the TSA procedures. This organization is a joke! I had pat downs coming back from Mexico. They were polite and quick. The TSA is neiher. What about using dogs? Mexico and other countries do. How can they scan your body and your luggage, but shoes come off? What a waste this is. No wonder 17 airports opted out!!!!!

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  25. Bob, thanks for the info.

    Maybe you could go one step further and tell us how many complaints have been received from those airports where private firms do security?

    Have any of the following happened?:

    1)screener brings his gun to work.
    2)guy puts fake cocaine in passenger's bags and then harasses them.
    3)screener harassing passenger carrying cash.
    4)hire felons who can't get clearances and then pressure the airport admin into letting them in.

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  26. Real life for all claiming TSA providing a false sense of security...replace the scanners for pilots and flight attendants with breathalyzers and drug sniffing dogs!! Are you sensing enough safety and security now?

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  27. Well, as usual I see all of the dribble posted from people allegedly groped, radiated, felt up, molested, etc. These are the same people who complain about anything and everything and now TSA happens to be their favorite whipping post for lack of anything better to complain about. If you all would collectively pull the round orb called your head out of a well known place and realize that terrorist organizations relish what you are doing, perhaps you might find a small particle of common sense.

    Granted there have so far been no further incidents of planes blowing up or being flown into buildings but that doesn't mean that the intent is no longer there. You complain about scanners, pat downs, etc., yet none of you apparently realize how small an amount of explosive is needed to take down an aircraft. The people who have intent to do harm to this country have no qualms at all in sacrificing anyone in the name of Allah. To further enlighten you so called self appointed security experts, a small baby diaper could hold enough explosive to fatally cripple a 777 aircraft. If you want to go back to pre 9/11 type of security, then perhaps there needs to be a separate part of the airport where you just walk in unscreened along with your like minded bretheren. The plane would be operatead by a flight crew who did want to go through screening, and all board the same plane bound for wherever you wish to go. And did I say that two of these people are actually home grown terrorist who had purchased flight crew uniforms and are not vetted by any agency and have no intention of making it to where you want to go? They are supposedly jump seating to their next airport and don't need a boarding pass to get on board the aircraft. And they did not go through screening either.

    Good luck on your trip. What I would like to see posted are some solutions that make sense. If you are going to complain, come up with a logical and workable solution. Also, get your facts straight which the majority of people seem incapable of doing. Don't just rely on the news media as they seem incapable of anything other sensationalism and whatever they can do to boost ratings.

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  28. Private contractors may still have to follow TSA guidelines, but I'd bet they'd be nicer, more professional and a whole lot smarter than the rude, untrained and unprofessional folks manning the stations these days.

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  29. TSA is drunk with power. Come to your senses and go after the bad guys. Stop harassing U.S. citizens!

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  30. I want you to know, I will never ever ever fly again! Hell would freeze over before I let a stranger touch me invasively or in an "enhanced" manner, nor would I allow my own government to take a naked picture of me. You're gonna have to find something else.

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  31. To those of you who wish to claim if people don't like it don't fly, remember that if you are that afraid of terrorists you are also welcome to stay at home and let the government continue to provide a nanny state which is safe.
    The rest of us will be enjoying life and freedom with all of its inherent dangers. At the same time we will continue to protect our constitutional rights.
    Remember old Ben Franklin and the 4th Amendment.

    BTW I have repeatedly suggested the use of dogs, which have been proven effective and non-invasive.

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  32. Could you tell us why they chose to fire the TSA?

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  33. To Chris Bray. You are incorrect. The contractors are hired and paid by TSA. The airports don't hire them when they opt out TSA does. And we pay substaintly more money as taxpayers to the contractors than we do to Feds.

    To Avxo You are also incorrect the SFO airport has 1300 contracted screeners and if you go through that airport you will see all the things you describe and more crazy stuff. They even hired a convicted felon at one point who was performing screening. Bad assumptions.

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  34. Private companies are simply more efficient than the government, simple as that. Their personnel is better trained, they are not as arrogant, and they have to operate in the competitive environment. Look at SFO, is one of the best airports in the country. So, OUT with TSA! OPT OUT!!

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  35. Does it make you feel good having so much power over people and then rubbing their noses in it?

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  36. Bob,

    We see the point of your post.

    Bob,

    Care to comment about what will happen under one of the following scenarios? I think we call all agree one of them will happen.

    1) Judicial override of pat-down policy.
    2) Legislation banning the use of AIT.
    3) CDRH/FDA changing it's mind and implementing recall of Backscatter and/or MMW (I work in the medical device industry. Their opinion does change regarding safety and effectiveness of devices)

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  37. The TSA is little more than a work-assist program. I fly weekly and most of the TSA agents do little more than idle around and shoot the breeze with each other. Colleagues of mine have had laptops stolen by the TSA at LaGuardia. Why can't airlines self-regulate their own security procedures? They have more to loose than the government should a security breach happen. The TSA is a bloated, inefficient organization that should be shut down and replaced with private enterprise.

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  38. TSA HAS NOTHING TO REGULATE. They haven't stopped anything. They don't make anything more safe. Your job is a joke. 67,000+ employees since the 2001 inception. Enjoy those government benefits. Your job is NOT serious. IT IS A JOKE. Don't forget that. Think about what you are asking another human being to do. You have no God-given authority to do these things to a personal individual.

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  39. Who comes up with the solutions that will 'make us safer' when we fly?
    Doesn't bomb sniffing DOGS sound better than a scanning machine emitting radiation? I don't care if they tell me there is no risk, and minimal radiation; I don't believe them. The government lies to us all the time. I would rather be sniffed by a dog than have some TSA agent groping me; or go through the scanner. What I want to know is who is making money on these scanners? I guess using dogs wouldn't make someone rich but if you buy stock in the scanning machine company you would........

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  40. We will not rest. We will not rest until the TSA ceases to exist.

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  41. Guys-here is the authoritative take-from the intelligence community;Yes-there is a very heightened state of awareness that something is in the wind between now and New Years-but scrambling to cover new policies that should have been brought up to speed all during the year-is ludicrous, and will waste time and money at this window of time. The gal who runs security at Miami International Airport wanted to train her TSA cadre of "wonder-elites" to profile airport clients----huh? The program using that set of standards in Israel, using intelligence operatives and military-took years to become crackerjack effective! She is gonna do this to meet the threat---in a month-and has the nerve to publish this crap as PR to get the public "all fuzzy and cozy" about flying at a very dangerous time?! It is still security-on-the-cheap, the government does not value your life, and they only want your money and to promote the bottom line of corporate America! TSA was billed as better security-our information is that "it is the same old guard recruitment pool" at a higher price! Now the AIRLINES want to bring back the stop-gap smaller companies outsourced ( SAME INTELLECTUAL GUARD WONDERS AS BEFORE, ALSO!)in the past---and this will fill,and solve------exactly-----WHAT! Come on you folks-what is this security for-and if you are not putting serious training in new procedures. long-term, and giving serious "big guns" training----how is the public going to feel "safer"??????!!!!

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  42. The real crux of the TSA viability issue lies in why it was created at all-during a revamping of government compartments under GW BUSH-to show concerns arising from 9-11? NOPE! The airlines hated the concept, did not want to kick in money towards what they knew would afford them no greater comprehensive security then previous-and it opens the door to money misappropriation and corruption!I have been thirty years in all kinds of security, done some amazing things in my day-with little, or no backing-and this subject of airport security-as it stands in it's present form-is "A HEADLESS-HORSEMAN"---and,"I SUPPOSE IT WILL BECOME PAINFULLY CLEAR TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC, UPON THE NEXT TERRORIST INCIDENT, WHAT THE PUBLIC HAS NOT GOTTEN FOR THEIR UNDERFUNDED SECURITY DOLLARS"!

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  43. THE ONLY THING PATTED DOWN EFFECTIVELY,AT THIS POINT, HAS BEEN THE TAXPAYER'S POCKETS!!!!!!

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  44. Hey everyone!

    I just wanted to say I don't really see the point of hiring private security screeners. I mean honestly if you look at it statistically, which you should also do for TSA, right now the private people have about 16 airports. Not a whole lot of screeners there while TSA has the other 800+ airports. So if you say 100 screeners at each airport that is going to be 1600 private employees and 80000 tsa screeners. If 10% of your employees are going to be bad eggs (I think thats a reasonable amount for every business out there) that would mean there are 8000 bad tsa employees and only 160 bad private sector employees. This is all figurativly speaking but of course the private sector people are going to seem nicer because you have a much smaller chance of running across the bad eggs but as soon as they take over statistics say your going to have just as many bad employees no matter what and still the same scanners and pat downs as before only now your government is spending a ton more money. Why would we want that? And another thing for all we know many horror stories we hear online may have come from private sector screeners that the passengers just thought were TSA. Your going to have bad incidents not matter what, no organization is perfect. Fire departments, the Coast Guard, Customs, police departments, teachers, and doctors have all had there bad employees and incidents. TSA is just in the spotlight because its new and gets the most contact with the general public.

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  45. DOGS CAN SNIFF THE BUTTS OF HUMANS ALL LIVING DAY LONG, AND NOT PICK UP PETN EXPLOSIVE WRAPPED IN THE DEVICES ALLOWED ON PLANES-THEY ARE NOT A TOTAL ANSWER, NOR ARE THE COSTLY "GODZILLA SCANNING MACHINES"----YOU NEED TRAINED EYES AWAY FROM THE MACHINES, PLAIN CLOTHES, HIGHLY SENSITIVE TO PEOPLE-WATCHING-ROAMING THE LOBBIES. AH----YOU DO NOT BELIEVE-HAHAHA-THESE PEOPLE EXIST-RIGHT? WHO IS HERE TELLING YOU ABOUT THIS...?!

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  46. Anonymous at 11:06, you must be joking.

    Re: the SFO contractor you write, "They even hired a convicted felon at one point who was performing screening."

    Sean Shanahan, a Boston Logan TSO arrested on child rape charges. Alvin Crabtree, a Denver International Airport TSO who brought a gun to work. Hundreds of TSOs who have been arrested for stealing from passengers at checkpoints. Your argument is that, by dumping TSA screeners, we might end up with felons doing security screenings at airports? We crossed that line a while ago.

    The hiring requirements for a TSO: GED or a year of security experience. Go to usajobs.gov and look for yourself.

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  47. Enough is enough. Time to get rid of the TSA.

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  48. "herp derp TSA rules"

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  49. I think something was rigged in the CBS poll.
    I know of no one who supports the TSA right now.
    If private contractors were hired instead of the disfunctionl TSA, we'd have more effective security and better privacy.

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  50. avxo said:
    It's unlikely the private companies will hire 350+ lbs individuals who sweat profusely and breathe heavily just from the strain of standing up.

    It's unlikely the private companies will tolerate rudeness, slacking and poor performance from their employees.

    It's unlikely the private companies will have one lane open and allow 15+ employees to loiter in the screening area, chatting amongst themselves, while passengers queue up.

    Why? Because they want the airport's business, and the airport wants to project a positive image.

    Do you realize how many of the former private companies screeners are currently working for the tsa? In the begining over 50% of the screeners were incumbants. So you want your security done by a private company so that they can put their profit margins before you safety? the screening companies prior to 9/11 were owned by the airlines. the cost of keeping up with security will drive up the ticket prices. right now the airlines are getting a free ride for secuirty that $2 fee on your tickets is nothing compared to what ticket prices will go to once the airlines are involoved again. WAKE UP! you may not like the govt running security but the sirlines LOVE it. they get a free ride and have someone to blame when flights are delayed, something is missing or broken in your baggage, etc. plus just like bob said tsa will still regulate and determine what is to be done. will passengers still think that they can boss the screeners around when its a private company? you might find that alot of your problems will only get bigger cause itll be private. i cant wait for the complaining to go on for the private company blogs...

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  51. dannyman said:
    So . . . are these non-TSA employees employed by the federal government or is this one of those loopholes where airports get to hire the lowest-paid rent-a-cops they can find despite the post-9/11 promise that airport screeners would be federal employees?

    nongovt employees, they govt will only regulate. so they will protect their profit margins and spend even less on workforce and equipment. i hope they cut down on the workforce and the lines get longer and longer. then the only people standing around will be us, the passengers, then where will the complaints about all the tsa people standing around be? plus when these workers get fed up with working like crazy, they wont care anymore and will start to let things go so that they wont have to worj as hard. sounds like the kinda security i want to keep my family safe

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  52. anon said:
    "Private contractors may still have to follow TSA guidelines, but I'd bet they'd be nicer, more professional and a whole lot smarter than the rude, untrained and unprofessional folks manning the stations these days."

    says who? and if they arent what are you going to do to a private company? stop flying and penalize them so that the airlines complain and get govt assistance in the form of tsa all over again? its a no win for the tsa once again...

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  53. the constitution said:
    "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

    thats correct and the tsa isnt coming into your house. you are goin to the airport and standing in line to be searched. its an administrative search, you are subjecting yourself to it when you stand in line. whatever ways that the tsa wants to screen you, you are agreeing to by getting in line.

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  54. I have had a dear friend killed on 9/11/01.
    Please just go through the scanners.
    I believe the pilots have to go through the screens as well.
    I am a strong supporter of the TSA procedures.
    I wish this was done years ago.
    My girlfriend and her daughter would not of flown into Tower 1.

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  55. We will opt out of using the TSA because it is a "Terror Organization".

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  56. Wayne Brieske. I have simply stopped flying. The TSA has ran amok and has wasted so much money and time it's incalculable. I will not submit to it. The sooner the Airlines wake up to this the better. I used to fly 6-10 times a year domestically but not anymore. I take the time to plan the journey and will drive, use the train and or take a charter flight.

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  57. They may still have to use "your procedures," but perhaps they can avoid this kind of a situation.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40291856/ns/travel-news/from/toolbar

    I would like to think private contracted security would worry more about their jobs and be more careful than the current set of hard to fire government employees.

    As Mr. Sawyer says:“I am a good American and I want safety for all passengers as much as the next person,but if this country is going to sacrifice treating people like human beings in the name of safety, then we have already lost the war.”

    I agree with him! We have lost if this is what we have come to. I no longer fly due to these procedures and have canceled trips due to this. I hope you all have accomplished what you hoped for with these new measures. I suppose with fewer safe people flying it is easier for you all to pick out the unsafe ones.

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  58. I feel saddened for all the folks that have to endure this humiliating circumstance. I do not just mean the flyers that have to undergo such searches but also the employees that have to follow the orders of bad management. As a ex-military man I undestand how hard it can be to take an order that you do not believe is the proper way. I sincerely hope that some of those employees read these posts and realize that sometimes you have to stand up to those above you and remind them of the right way of doing things. Is your job really worth the way you will feel when you lay down to sleep tonight.

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  59. Government polls are rigged.

    They can be manipulated to generate any result you want depending on who you ask and the way you phrase the question.

    Several years ago I was asked to participate in such a poll. I knew what the result would be even before all the data had been gathered.

    This poll is not trustworthy.

    K Smith

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  60. Blogger Bob:

    I have lurked on this blog for a while, but have not felt compelled to post until today.

    This evening I discovered a very disturbing video on the internet showing a young boy (perhaps under 10), shirtless, receiving a pat-down by a group of TSOs.

    The link can be found here: http://travel.usatoday.com/flights/post/2010/11/no-enhanced-pat-downs-for-kids-tsa-says/131686/1?csp=34travel

    Needless to say, this video is especially off-putting in light of the TSA's recent (and in my opinion, wise) decision to exempt children under 12 from "enhanced" pat-downs. Link here: http://travel.usatoday.com/flights/post/2010/11/no-enhanced-pat-downs-for-kids-tsa-says/131686/1?csp=34travel

    So, I would like to ask a couple of questions and get the TSA's take on this:

    1) Why was the boy receiving a pat-down without a shirt? Are there relevant parts of the event which the video leaves out?

    2) Is it the TSA's policy to administer shirtless pat-downs to children (and, by implication, adults)? If so, can you please tell me the *direct relation* that such a procedure would have to airline safety?

    3) If it is *not* the TSA's policy to administer shirtless pat-downs to children, why were those TSOs operating against policy? Will there be disciplinary action taken against them?

    4) What safeguards are there to ensure that pedophiles or other sex offenders do not infiltrate the TSA's ranks? What recourse do parents have to take action against a search of a child which they feel was inappropriate?

    I would really appreciate your candor in answering these questions, I believe the flying public deserves it.

    Sincerely,

    Concerned Flyer

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  61. The Delete-O-Meter jumped from 3963 to 5488 in one day?

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  62. "If you all would collectively pull the round orb called your head out of a well known place and realize that terrorist organizations relish what you are doing, perhaps you might find a small particle of common sense."

    Actually they relish what people like you and the TSA are doing. This country is bleeding money and our civil rights are eroding because everyone is afraid of the boogeyman. Bin Laden is laughing it up in his cozy cave. Also he doesn't have to worry about having his cave foreclosed on.

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  63. Wow! How right the New Yorker was and how funny that you said seeing us naked was not going to happen.

    http://blog.tsa.gov/2008/05/friday-afternoon-cartoons.html

    I guess they were right and you were oh so wrong!

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  64. Bob - any reason you deleted my post? Will restate summary again (#3).... two reasons to opt out (regardless if 'tsa rules' are still "lord"... (a) private corporations have better ethics, professionalism, etc. and will do MUCH better/considerate work. (b) TSA won't get any money, so eventually this FACt WILL change policies.
    Dude, stop deleting comments. Bob, why don't you reply to the comments you stirred up? Go on, don't be chicken...

    Dr. M, MAJ US Army

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  65. (1) Private companies will have WAY better work ethics/professionalism,
    (2) no monies given to TSA will definitely affect what "laws" they make/change.

    ReplyDelete
  66. I love to travel, and having lost someone in the WTC, I know safety is needed. 1. Profile and be wary of those who fit the profile. This does not mean all Muslims, just those who have not lived here or have family to visit. 2. I am not taking my wedding rings off to be scanned. Get dogs. 3. No one is running their hands under my breasts. They are large and I am not hiding anything under them. Get dogs to sniff and use profiles. 4. I trust my government but not all citizens. I have my luggage broken in to. If stores can have video camera/loss prevention why cannot airlines and airports?
    One solution: we bring no luggage, no freight and no clothing following a body cavity search. I guess I will never meet my family that left the U.S. back in the 50's. I am done with air travel until it becomes sensible. Retiring a well used passport.

    ReplyDelete
  67. Hey guess what I found:
    http://blog.tsa.gov/2008/05/friday-afternoon-cartoons.html

    2 years ago old Blogger Bob making jokes saying that what is going on right now would "never happen"

    And he wonders why we think he is a bald-faced liar cranking out propaganda. Two years from now he'll be telling us that random body cavity searches "just make good security sense."

    Pathetic!

    ReplyDelete
  68. The title of this post shows that it is about using power over citizens. It has never been about security.

    The comment policy says that this blog is for a dialog. If this is a dialog, then LISTEN. Stop abusing the citizens of this country.

    Treat everyone with the same respect you claim to espouse on this blog.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Are you planning to crow about polls that show how detested the scanners are? Komo News's poll, for example, has 17% approve, 14% dislike but tolerate, and 69% think they're a gross breach of human dignity. Since I know the TSA is absolutely even-handed about these things, I'm looking forward to this one getting as much coverage on tsa.gov as the CBS one.

    http://www.komonews.com/home/poll/109556619.html?submit=Submit&oid=3&mr=1&t=a&cid=3031&pid=109556619&pollpg=y

    ReplyDelete
  70. Now.. a growing number of passengers will look nervous anxious and like they are worried about the security check.

    Boy.. that makes it much harder to find the REAL TERRORISTS doesn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  71. The day TSA stops screening will be the day my family and I stop flying.

    ReplyDelete
  72. Rosemary Blair said...
    I have had a dear friend killed on 9/11/01.
    Please just go through the scanners.
    I believe the pilots have to go through the screens as well.
    I am a strong supporter of the TSA procedures.
    I wish this was done years ago.
    My girlfriend and her daughter would not of flown into Tower 1.

    November 20, 2010 7:58 PM

    .................
    Sorry about your dear friend, thousands of others lost friends and love ones on 9/11.

    However that does not justify what TSA is doing.

    There is no excuse to surrender our freedoms in order to fly. There is no reason for a virtual strip search or invasive pat down that borders on sexually assault.

    In short Rosemary, the answer is NO! I will not just go through the scanner.

    ReplyDelete
  73. I just sent the following questions to my elected officials.

    1. Will you support Ron Paul’s legislation to restrict TSA pat downs?

    2. Will you set the example for your constituents by submitting to a public, on camera pat down by a TSA agent?

    3. Will you call on all other federal elected or politically appointed officials to do the same?

    4. Will you introduce legislation establishing an external panel including average citizens to review and certify federal law enforcement policies and procedures for contact with the general public?

    ReplyDelete
  74. I see little need for private contractors procured though low bidding. Most of the complaining I hear is do to an anomaly in the search process. If a person has an unusual circumstance he or she should resolve the problem with TSA before going to the airport or just not just think their going to get automatic permission to fly. This mindset slows the line for other passengers.

    ReplyDelete
  75. Anonymous said...
    The Delete-O-Meter jumped from 3963 to 5488 in one day?

    November 20, 2010 10:59 PM

    ...................
    Proof of illegal censorship and constitutional violations of our Constitutional First Amendment Protections by government employees in particular Blogger Bob Burns.

    ReplyDelete
  76. From Anonymous:

    "To Chris Bray. You are incorrect. The contractors are hired and paid by TSA. The airports don't hire them when they opt out TSA does. And we pay substaintly more money as taxpayers to the contractors than we do to Feds."

    Completely, absolutely, totally incorrect. Private contractors cost 20-30% LESS than Federal employees. The total life-cycle cost of Federal employees (benefits, retirement, huge workers comp costs) is much higher.

    Get your facts straight.

    ReplyDelete
  77. After you folks or private security contractors run hands over what used to be private parts, could you at least change your rubber gloves before you do the next passenger?

    Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  78. Please contact your Congressman/Congresswoman and ask them to support H.R. 6416 - American Traveller Dignity Act of 2010.

    ReplyDelete
  79. Rosemary Blair wrote:

    I believe the pilots have to go through the screens as well.

    Yeah, because the pilots actually need something other than the plane they are about to be in control of to cause damage...


    I am a strong supporter of the TSA procedures.

    Great as that may be, what does it mean? By what standards are you judging their procedures? What are you credentials in security allowing you to evaluate their procedures?


    I wish this was done years ago.
    My girlfriend and her daughter would not of flown into Tower 1.


    Non sequitur.

    ReplyDelete
  80. Liberte wrote: The day TSA stops screening will be the day my family and I stop flying.

    Right, because they've done such a good job...

    It's not like TSA employees planted fake drugs on a member of the public going through the checkpoint. Oh, wait...

    Well, it's not like TSA employees steal stuff from members of the public going through the checkpoint. Oh, wait...

    At least they're trained well and they know what credentials one can use to fly. Well, except when they don't. On this very blog, TSOWilliamReed retorted about the NEXUS card: "NEXUS cards....no idea what that is and I can tell you they are not on the list of acceptable IDs." Well, except, you know... they are.

    Well, despite all that, at least they are good about screening right? It's not like they miss 75% of fake bombs slipped through the checkpoint as training at LAX, right? Ah... dangit! Not again!

    Seriously Liberte, what -- if any -- evidence do you have to demonstrate that the TSA does a better job than it's predecessors?

    Even the much-ballyhooed "standardization of procedures" across airports is mostly hot air. The only thing that's standardized is the fancy uniform and the presence of the barker at the front of the checkpoint.

    ReplyDelete
  81. After reviewing articals and videos regarding the screening and pat downs I would like to give a suggestion that would put people ast ease with the policies and procedures of the TSA and/or any private security firm.
    1. I noticed many TSA agents do not know how to greet a traveler.they don't smile,carry on conversations,or thank the traveler and wishing them a safe trip.Public relations are a an important part of the security procedure.
    2.Do away with hands on pat downs:Use a wand to substitute pat downs. A garret wand can detect the smallest pieces of metal.People will feel more at ease with the wand procedure.
    3.As regards to underclothing TSA should consider a private pat down of foreign travelers only.People that are from a foreign country that were born here and have been confirmed US citizens sometimes visit their relatives in their homeland.Im not saying they are a threat to us.Im saying they need to be checked for their sdafety and the safety of others.
    4.Remember 911? 3000 people said their last goodbyes to their loved ones just before they parished.Look at the underwear bomber.what a bad mistake,but thank God it was caught in time.you have to give TSA and private security some credit for catching this threat.There should be ways developed by the military or government that detects chemicals on a persons body.TSA and private security firms need to look to the military for equiptment to detect chemicals.
    If I were the head of any government organization such as TSA or a private security firm I would make sure that the policies and procedures do not violate the privacy of the passanger,and their right of privacy. We can catch a threat before it starts by being more visual,observent,friendly but serious.We must reform our policies and procedures in the TSA sector as well as private security.I got to hand it to TSA and private security.At least they are catching potential threats.Reform our system and then we can put a stop to terrorism.think about this.!

    ReplyDelete
  82. If a private contractor does take over screening duties from TSA, those "former" TSA employees will be hired by the contractor. So, what changes? Absolutely nothing as far as screening procedures and personnel. The change is purely political and financial.

    ReplyDelete
  83. Liberte said...

    The day TSA stops screening will be the day my family and I stop flying.


    By all means stay at home, the rest of us will be enjoying our freedoms and the inherent risks that come with them.

    Remember the 4th Amendment and old Ben Franklin.

    ReplyDelete
  84. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says the TSA has gone too far!

    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2010/11/21/clinton-tsa-try-make-airport-screening-intrusive/

    ReplyDelete
  85. this posting is missing one VERY important detail that you should have included, Bob.

    I speak about SFO, the site of a very public mishap regarding security/passenger interaction, uses private security and has been since 2006.

    ReplyDelete
  86. Guess what... members of Congress are exempt from TSA advanced screening. Who would have thought? Suck it up, plebes.

    http://erictric.com/2010/11/20/members-of-congress-exempt-from-tsa-ait-full-body-scanners/

    ReplyDelete
  87. The only people concerned about this run the TSA. Everyone else is cheering the first step of eliminating the TSA.

    ReplyDelete
  88. Pistole is clearly getting the message. What he doesn't realize is, it's too late for him. The American people want him fired, and that's exactly what is going to happen. It just makes good security sense.

    http://www.nationaljournal.com/nationalsecurity/tsa-chief-backs-off-hard-line-stance-on-searches-20101121

    ReplyDelete
  89. If an airport uses private security, and someone refuses to go thru the scanner or pat down, is the private firm obligated by Federal Law to detain you and/or have you arrested?

    ReplyDelete
  90. I made a comment before that appears to have been censored.

    In your myth versus fact you quoted from the TSA head John P saying that everyone would be treated the same. This directly contradicts a prior statement by John P's boss, Janet N who stated that on this particular issue there would be 'more to come' rather than saying what Mr John P said.

    So, how are we to figure out myth versus fact when there is not consistency at the top of the TSA?

    PS, I recommend to everyone posting here that they save all comments and repost those which are arbitrarily censored by Blogger Bob and his gang of constitution violating police.

    ReplyDelete
  91. TSA has only commented on the amount of "whole body" radiation delivered by the euphemism of "advanced body imaging". First, this is backscatter X-ray, which is radiation by any euphemism. Second, much more important than whole body radiation is the amount of radiation delivered to sensitive internal organs. What level of mrems are delivered to them? The fact that TSA has not commented on this issue is prima facie evidence that they are withholding this information.

    ReplyDelete
  92. Anything to avoid having to deal with an arrogant out of control entity like TSA

    ReplyDelete
  93. It looks so badly on the TSA to pick the one CBS poll that supports body scanners and not mention any of the other polls against it. This one-sided reporting reflects poorly on the organization, in the face of numerous allegations of mismanagement, and human rights violations.

    ReplyDelete
  94. I speak from personal experience when i say that the "Private companies" mentioned here might cost less than TSA, they also pay their officers FAR less, offer little or no health benefit/insurance, have a turnover rate that is upwards of 25%, which means less experienced officers, lack some of the new equipment that federalized airports have, and DEFINATELY dont alot as much time each week for officer training as TSA does.

    Privatizing the workforce would be the worse thing they could do. It will end up like pre-9/11.... security sold to the lowest bidder.

    Instead, keep federal TSA officers, but please, for the love of god, raise the minimum requirements for hiring them, and give them REAL training... like a few months of training at least. 150hrs initial training just isnt enough.

    Dont privatize the workforce. Professionalize it.

    ReplyDelete
  95. Thank you anonymous at 9:48 a.m. on Nov 21. After all the spazzing out, it was great to read something sensible. Folks really flipped out when they found out that private contractors had to follow the same procedures as TSA officers!

    Please, folks...don't fly. Ever. The rest of us can then get through secuirty quickly and get to our destinations. My heart is with the families of those lost on 9/11,not with a bunch of crybabies.

    I travel quite a bit on business and can tell you that there are some countries in which an enhanced pat down is done to all flyers. Leaving India, it was "ladies to the left, gentlemen to the right" for a pretty intense go-over. Traveling to New Orleans recently, the scanner picked up the buttons on my skirt back pockets and I was then patted down in that area. It simply wasn't a big deal and the officer was professional and courteous, explaining that she was going to pass the back of her hands across my hips. Simple as pie and I was on my way.

    Again, feel free not to fly. The rest of us don't want you.

    ReplyDelete
  96. TSA is the only government agency that touches the genitals of the public and does not investigate any form of citizen complaint nor adheres to a public review policy of conduct concerns unless it a passage goes to the media or the police make a case of an incident. TSA simply has no plan in place to review the wrongdoing of TSA screeners AND share those findings with the public. The TSA's arrogance demonstrates that the leadership should go and the agency retooled. It is amazing how oblivious TSA is to the constitution, American values, and logic.

    ReplyDelete
  97. Guess what, Bob--TSA is under the authority of Congress. If Congress, responding to the American people, decides to rein you folks in, you will be reined in. You aren't the ultimate authority. Read the Constitution. Memorize it. Perhaps you guys need to take an oath to "preserve and protect it."

    ReplyDelete
  98. Whatever happened to private property?(yes a business is private property) The airlines should be responsible for passenger safety, not government bureaucrats. I would rather have security completely privatized, and allow airlines to prescreen passengers, instead of having government thugs on a power trip feeling up old ladies. 9/11 would never of never happened if the pilots had a gun and a stronger door on the cockpit.
    Those who are willing trade freedom for security deserve neither.

    ReplyDelete
  99. I find it hilarious that people think private companies will be better in their duties than the TSA. Officers working the private contract will get payed less, have less benefits, and be more understaffed. Before coming to TSA I worked private contracts for 5 years, and was a manager for a private company. Nearly all unarmed contracts that pay low, are staffed by what you people call "mcdonalds drop outs" You'll have even more low quality officers than there are now. I'll be the first to admit TSA needs to re-write their hiring qualifications, but private contracts are not the way to go.
    Quit pointing to polls! Viewer polls are the most inaccurate percentages people could come up with. I will say however, more and more people keep asking me what all the fuss is about, its not as bad as the media, and commenters make it out to be. Everyone has their own opinion on the procedures. I present both sides, to the opposing, and the supporters, both parties are going to stick to their sides no matter what.

    ReplyDelete
  100. don't people realize that opting out and causing huge delays on Wed will only hurt THEM, not the TSA - the TSA agants could care less because they have to be there for 8hrs anyway, and you'll just be giving them overtime$$(OUR tax$$!!). THEY are not the ones who need to catch that connecting flight or be at Aunt Nellie's to stuff the turkey -YOU ARE!!! You are only hurting YOURSELVES!!!!! Duh!

    ReplyDelete
  101. people who do not want to submit to body screening can walk or drive to there destinations, my daughter flys all the time with her dad and it seems that we all seemed to have forgot about 9/11 i would rather have a body screen then get the plane blown up by some idiot carrying a bomb again if you dont like body screening dont get on the plane and walk to you destination it is for our safety so that another incident doesnt happen

    ReplyDelete
  102. 4.Remember 911? 3000 people said their last goodbyes to their loved ones just before they parished.Look at the underwear bomber.what a bad mistake,but thank God it was caught in time.you have to give TSA and private security some credit for catching this threat.

    November 21, 2010 1:24 PM

    ..........
    No, we do not give TSA credit for catching the underwear bomber.

    This person boarded a flight to the United States from Europe.

    TSA did not provide the screening.

    Even more damming is that the United States had been made aware that the underwear bomber was a potential threat yet US officials clear the person to board his flight.

    The underwear bombers device would not have exploded. That has been established. It would and did burn at a high temperature but did not and could not have exploded.

    The passengers on that flight are the ones who took down the bomber. Not TSA!

    ReplyDelete
  103. Cant wait to see what happens on Weds "national opt out day" if things dont come to a halt then the tsa will look like they can handle it and do a good job. cant wait for it to backfire...

    ReplyDelete
  104. The point of opting out of TSA screening is to attempt hiring of more intelligent and responsive individuals and to require that they be better trained. That's the HUGE issue TSA faces. I fly 2 times every week and so encounter lots of TSA employees.

    The quality of the personnel is inconsistent at best. Far too many are arrogant, rude, and ignorant. Add to that, that they are at times clearly directed to lie. Whether that direction is local or from DHS I have no idea, but when an inquiry regarding a clearly different procedure are met with the insistence from agents and supervisors that "we've always done it this way" they're lying.

    (How to handle something you don't want them to talk about? Have them respectfully express their regret that they are not allowed to talk about it.)

    Little of this is the fault of the folks at the screening checkpoints. They are who they are. The fault lies in the hiring standards, the training and the supervision. We know, for example, that a sex crime conviction is not a disqualifier for hiring. Absurd! Ans as the Steve Bieffelt incident clearly demonstrated, the individuals tasked with investigation have minimal understanding (and therefore inadequate training) in the law and in investigative techniques.

    The screening standards may be the same, but a private contractor who wishes to keep the contract cannot afford low hiring standards, sloppy and inadequate training, and arrogant, rude individuals.

    ReplyDelete
  105. My comments have been censored twice despite being consistent with the Comment Policy. Beware although it appears you are getting a somewhat unfiltered view here, the fact is that certain topics will not be posted.

    ReplyDelete
  106. Wait a second...don't we still live in a democracy? Don't our tax dollars fund Government organizations, such as the TSA? As such, they answer to *us*. We are their bosses.

    I'm not sure how, but some how, the people need to voice at the next election to disband the T$A's waste of tax dollars.

    ReplyDelete
  107. Next they will stage a false flag "terrorist attack" on a major roadway. You know they want to implement permanent roadside checkpoints and permanent roving checkpoints.

    Here is how they will sell it:
    By driving a public road you automatically consent to a search of your vehicle and person. "It's for your safety...we all have to make sacrifices, but it is a small price to pay to prevent the next car bomb on the road." "if you want to drive on public roads, you have to be willing to give up some of your rights."

    Sound familiar????

    You know the TSA salivates at the thought of this. Don't forget their what their acronym means.

    ReplyDelete
  108. "Privatizing the workforce would be the worse thing they could do. It will end up like pre-9/11.... security sold to the lowest bidder."

    Hmm. Let's think that over. What, exactly, did the 9/11 private screeners fail to do? Please don't tell me they let people through who had box cutters - blades of 4" or less were allowed then.

    The dirty secret is that FAA guidelines both in the air and on the ground contributed to allowing the 9/11 hijackers to get away with their evil acts.


    "Dont privatize the workforce. Professionalize it."

    Privatize it AND professionalize it. It will never be professionalized as long as it's Federal.

    ReplyDelete
  109. "Folks really flipped out when they found out that private contractors had to follow the same procedures as TSA officers! "

    Yes, but privatized screeners will do them better.

    Have a privatized screener demand that a female breast cancer victim remove her prosthetic breast and there will be accountability. Or were those TSOs disciplined...and I just missed it?

    "Please, folks...don't fly. Ever. The rest of us can then get through secuirty quickly and get to our destinations. My heart is with the families of those lost on 9/11,not with a bunch of crybabies."

    Sorry, but it's not about you. It's about the Constitution and the MY liberty. It's not yours to deny me. Give it a shot if you like but you won't like the result.

    So the way we show our compassion to those who lost loved ones on 9/11 is to give up freedoms with no increase in security? That's silly and dangerous.

    Following your line of reasoning, I expect that you allow the police to search your home anytime they choose. Or do you not care about 9/11 victims?

    "I travel quite a bit on business and can tell you that there are some countries in which an enhanced pat down is done to all flyers. Leaving India, it was "ladies to the left, gentlemen to the right" for a pretty intense go-over."

    So, you think we should emulate India? Now you're being silly and scary.

    "Traveling to New Orleans recently, the scanner picked up the buttons on my skirt back pockets and I was then patted down in that area. It simply wasn't a big deal and the officer was professional and courteous, explaining that she was going to pass the back of her hands across my hips. Simple as pie and I was on my way."

    Good to know that the TSO was able to ensure you weren't wearing button-sized bombs on your butt.

    "Again, feel free not to fly. The rest of us don't want you."

    I won't allow the likes of you to give away my freedom. As I said above, give it a shot, if this is so important to you.

    ReplyDelete
  110. "don't people realize that opting out and causing huge delays on Wed will only hurt THEM, not the TSA - the TSA agants could care less because they have to be there for 8hrs anyway, and you'll just be giving them overtime$$(OUR tax$$!!). THEY are not the ones who need to catch that connecting flight or be at Aunt Nellie's to stuff the turkey -YOU ARE!!! You are only hurting YOURSELVES!!!!! Duh!"

    It's called "civil disobedience." Google it.

    ReplyDelete
  111. Anonymous said...
    don't people realize that opting out and causing huge delays on Wed will only hurt THEM, not the TSA - the TSA agants could care less because they have to be there for 8hrs anyway, and you'll just be giving them overtime$$(OUR tax$$!!). THEY are not the ones who need to catch that connecting flight or be at Aunt Nellie's to stuff the turkey -YOU ARE!!! You are only hurting YOURSELVES!!!!! Duh!

    November 22, 2010 7:54 AM

    ............
    Wrong. TSA has brought air travel to this. It is TSA's screening methods that are unreasonable and intrusive.

    Citizens can only fight back in so many peaceful ways and Opting Out is a means of protest.

    ReplyDelete
  112. Have to add my two cents to some of these people's comments.
    1. Contractors are required to be paid and compensated equally to the federal workers. So no, it will not be the lowest bidder with cheepest employees. This is written within the provision.
    2. Dogs are great, as someone stated below. Unfortunately, they can only work in short spurts to stay focused and effective. Detection dogs are not like police K-9s or sentry dogs. They can only work 4-5 hours total in a day. You would need hundreds of dogs for the busiest airports. (expensive dogs + 1 yr training + kennels + care = fiscally impossible.)
    3. When you fly, you consent to having your person and property searched. It contractually stipulated in purchasing your ticket. It is also played audibly throughout the airports as well as posted at every ticket counter. When you "voluntarily" enter a screening checkpoint, you have given "implied consent" to search. You ticket is a contract and a stipulation in your use of this contract is that you will consent to search. Therefore, the TSA is not taking away or skewing your rights using these searches. You are surrendering them. (ugly truth)Your alternative? pretty obvious, don't fly. Funny because, I never see people screaming about their rights being violated when they are searched entering a football game. hmm...None at a courtroom. Even more ironic is the fact that, flying is voluntary and you can choose not to be subject to a search or these scanners. (don't enter the checkpoint)But there may come a time when you have no choice to go to court. If you are called in, you are forced to go through these systems or you could be in contempt for not showing up. No protests there though. strange....
    4. The El Al theory. People claim that TSA should emulate their security system. Go to their website and see exactly what that means. Also, be prepared to show up 3 hours prior to your flight to go through the security process. (As they REQUIRE!) Also be prepared for additional screening if you are not a Jewish citizen of Israel. They are the lowest threat level in their system. American Tourists fall within the second tier, which is only one step above any persons with middle eastern decent. Do I sound too racy? Wiki them and see what profiling security looks like.
    5. Flying is not a Constitutional Right. The thought that because our taxes help to subsidize it, must makes it a right, is no bueno. My taxes pay for NASA, but I have yet to get a space shuttle ride. I pay for tens of thousands of military aircraft, but they don't let me ride in them either.
    6. There is one point I would not refute, contract employees would be much more polite and have better customer service. For obvious reasons, I completely agree with this one.

    ~Just a TSA guy.

    ReplyDelete
  113. Why not just do away with screening altogether. Come on we are all Americans and everybody knows there are no terrorist in America. Just ask everyone in the lines they will tell you they are not one. You can tell a terrorist right away like you can tell a murderer, rapist, extortionist, or any other type of criminal. No need to look in my bags either for I am an American thus not Terrorist. Since everyone is using it’s against the constitution I will use it also. It’s against the constitution the right to privacy sounds good. Then if something happens we all can blame ourselves for not spotting the bad guy or girl, or old man or women (Case in point the guy who made to look like an old man). I THANK THE TSO’s AND TSA FOR THEIR JOB IN KEEPING US SAFE ON THE PLANE. I don’t trust anyone in the line to be screened until they go through the screening process. I traveled enough and seen people being arrested for having guns in their bags or other weapons. If you don’t believe me look at TSA stats on what they found in a year! If you think it is too intrusive don’t fly! I WANT MY FAMILY TO BE SAFE WHEN THEY FLY. I went though allot of screening and all the publicity is all media HYPE! SO AGAIN THANK YOU TSA AND TSO’S FOR A JOB WELL DONE!!!

    ReplyDelete
  114. It's so easy to complain and not offer a solution. Admittedly the TSA approach is intrusive and the horror stories will be enhanced for a yellow press public. Exactly how many people are really complaining? Should we use a profiling based screening process? The ACLU will have a field day. Simply put the process is evolving, and with luck and skill things are plodding along successfully.

    TSA has its own internal management problems. Management is not cohesive and every FSD is out for themself. There are constant purges against the TSO's and moral is badly damaged. The original TSO’s who were mature law enforcement and civil service employees were drummed out and replaced by HS equivlancy level candidates. I use a very broad brush stroke here. These are young people who have no sense of professionalism and view the position as an entitlement.

    Consequently, they are easy to set up and fire. Does anyone have stats in TSA’s turnover rate?

    Add to this AFGE and NTEU among other pseudo labor organizations are both fighting to champion the cause of the TSO's. They are both looking for another 40.000 person dues paying cash cow and care little about the members involved.
    Since the FLRA has ruled that TSA must recognize a National Union there is little wondering the cry for privatization has risen? Does anyone remember Airport Security was private before 911? Can cries for collective bargaining be far off?

    With all this controversy there is one thing to remember. When you are at the airport the only safe area is the space behind the screening area.

    ReplyDelete
  115. I believe that all tsa agents doing these new screenings and patdowns should be charged with sexual assualt charges, as well as be listed on sexual offenders list.

    ReplyDelete
  116. "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." -The 4th Amendment

    "Those who would give up liberty to in return for safety deserve neither and will lose both."-Ben Franklin

    Oldies but goodies. But the TSA should know all about goodies, after all they've got plenty of hands-on experience.

    ReplyDelete
  117. Thank you, Anonymous, Now 21, 9:37 PM. You very succinctly describe the unknowledgeable sheepitude so rampant among Americans.

    Leaving India, it was "ladies to the left, gentlemen to the right" for a pretty intense go-over.

    Does India have a Bill of Rights with a comparable entry requiring a search warrant based on sworn Probable Cause before a government-required search can be conducted? We do. Keep in mind that there are no clauses in the 4thAM that exempt "really good reasons", whether those be "national security", "fear of terrorism", "fear of drunk drivers" or just plain old general public panty-wetting over random fears.

    There's no exception, either, for "administrative" searches. Anyone who can read the 4thAM and find those clauses in it are seriously trippin' out on the psychedelics.

    Traveling to New Orleans recently, the scanner picked up the buttons on my skirt back pockets and I was then patted down in that area.

    Um ... what you aren't getting is that if the scanner could "pick up buttons" but not identify what they were, then neither could an agent "passing the back of her hand across" the area.

    Safety gained? bupkus. Two separate inspections, one detected 'something' that it couldn't identify, the other confirmed the unidentified 'something' was really there. Simple as pie and you were on your way. The only way anyone could confirm those things as mere buttons instead of, say, an electronic switch for the explosives you packed in your checked luggage would be to have you untuck and submit to a visual inspection of your shirt-tail.

    ...unless, of course, the scanner COULD identify that they were buttons, in which case flagging you for secondary groping was unnecessary authoritarian officiousness.

    Take your pick, "anonymous". Either they failed to adequately identify potential dangers, or they were flexing their muscles based on the traditional model of government: "Because we CAN."

    Again, feel free not to fly. The rest of us don't want you.

    Feel free to disregard your rights as a citizen and your duties to seek redress from the government whose primary duty is to uphold the Constitution. ...the Constitution whose purpose is to protect us from the GOVERNMENT. If the Government cannot fulfill their obligations without breaking the rules that protect US from ITSELF, then it either doesn't need doing, or we need to change the Constitution to allow them more authorities.

    Become a better citizen, "anonymous".

    [Become a better web-staff, TSA]

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  118. As a nearly 70 year old who has a knee replacement I have been wanded down the last three years but having gone thru the enhanced pat down the end of October I felt really violated. I will always be subjected to a pat down or full body scan no matter what so how does the TSA plan to treat those of us who have no option if we wish to travel?

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  119. TSA policy is nothing compared to a doctor who will pat you all over not with the back of his hand and go places TSA would never go

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  120. You may regulate the airports but who regulates you those are the people I wanna talk too? specifically about how everything your doing is unconstitutional and how you should be shut down.

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  121. @Chris Bray:

    The part about replacing with contractors is the tough part. TSA requires that the contractors give preferential treatment to TSA employees with regards to hiring.

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  122. Well blogger bob, you have once again chosen to LIE to the American public.

    However, your stupidity never ceases to amaze me. TSA is answerable to the American people whether you like it or not.

    You fail to grasp the fact that TSA funding rest in our elected officials. The American people are calling for the defunding of TSA FROM THE DHS BUDGET.

    While demanding the arrest and prosecution of TSA officers for sex crimes, and child molestation charges. Along with every supervisor for conspiring to commit said crimes.

    You exist only by the grace of the people. Like it or not, you serve the people, the people do not serve you. The fact that TSA has to be reminded of that is all the more reason that it should be defunded.

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  123. No one should get a pass on random selection. Not congress especially. They need to submit like every other citizen. In fact, I think that congressmen and women should be selected every time they fly commercial. Also make it a felony to possess screening images outside of the TSA system. I know the TSA thinks this irrelevant, buy any secure system can be compromised. Please give this some thought Mr. Pistol.

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  124. Mr. Pistole isn't listening, folks... because he doesn't have to.

    Take your concern to your elected representatives. If they violate your constitutional rights, at least you can vote against them in the next election.

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  125. monte said:
    "Take your concern to your elected representatives. If they violate your constitutional rights, at least you can vote against them in the next election."

    yes i would talk to your reps but i would first see what lobbyists they have on their side as there may be a conflict of interest. same goes for the new people that you elect. its the system that we, the people, have allowed to be put in place. your reps will only go after the tsa if it is within their agenda NOT what the voters want.

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  126. It just doesn't make sense that thousands of people (including me) are allowed to walk around airports carrying or towing unscanned bags. AIRPLANE SECURITY has proven quite successful without the added fluff of naked body scans and pat downs, but AIRPORT SECURITY still sucks.

    ReplyDelete

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