Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Talk To TSA - Secure Flight: November 1st Marks End of Grace Period for Airlines

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November 1st is right around the corner and with that date comes cooler weather, fall foliage and the seemingly never ending battle between rake and leaf. It also marks the end of the year-long grace period for airlines to clear their systems of old reservations made before TSA's Secure Flight requirements took effect last year.

This means that Secure Flight will not approve the issuance of a boarding pass if the required information is not provided. Required information being your name, date of birth, and gender as it appears on your recognized government ID.

Secure Flight is a behind the scenes watch list matching program that fulfills a key recommendation of the 9/11 Commission by assuming responsibility of watch list matching from individual airlines. By establishing a consistent watch list matching system, Secure Flight enhances aviation security and more effectively facilitates air travel for passengers.

Secure Flight watch list matching takes a matter of seconds to complete, and providing this data enables passengers to print their boarding passes at home and or at an airline kiosk and greatly reduces the likelihood of watch list misidentification. 

Blogger Bob has talked about Secure Flight here many times in the past and you can view all of those posts here on our TSA Blog, or you can visit our Secure Flight webpage. Here are answers to Secure Flight questions we’ve received through Talk to TSA:

What does the November 1 airline compliance date mean for passengers? The November 1 date requires passengers to provide complete Secure Flight passenger data when booking reservations so TSA can conduct watch list matching and approve airlines to issue a boarding pass. To avoid unnecessary delays and prevent misidentifications, passengers should provide complete Secure Flight data when booking airline travel, whether they have booked directly with the airline, a travel agent or an online booking site.

Will passengers still be able to book a ticket last-minute within 72 hours of a flight? Yes. TSA’s Secure Flight program can conduct watch list matching for passengers up until the time of the flight. Passengers will be prompted to provide Secure Flight information when booking travel. For reservations booked on short notice, or within 72 hours of the scheduled flight departure time, airlines must submit the required passenger information as soon as the reservation is made.

What happens if a passenger has an existing reservation for travel after November 1, 2010 and did not provide complete Secure Flight data when booking his or her flight? TSA advises passengers to contact their airlines or booking sources prior to arriving at the airport to ensure they have provided their full name, date of birth, gender, and Redress number (if applicable) as part of their reservations. While TSA’s watch list matching takes a matter of seconds and can be completed up until the time of departure, passengers should be aware that a boarding pass will not be issued until the airline submits complete passenger data to Secure Flight.

What if a passenger’s boarding pass and ID do not match exactly? Secure Flight and travel document checking are both critical security functions, yet they serve different purposes at different points in the security process. Secure Flight is a behind-the-scenes watch list matching process that takes place before checkpoint screening. Secure Flight asks that passengers enter their name as it appears on their government ID and passengers should strive to stay consistent between the name on their ID and the information they provide when booking their reservation. Once a passenger receives their boarding pass, the Secure Flight process is already complete.

At the security checkpoint, TSA strives to ensure your identification and boarding pass are authentic and validate you are who you say you are. Small differences in the name on the boarding pass and ID, like middle initials, should not impact your travel. It is not uncommon for the information printed on boarding passes to differ slightly from the information on IDs, depending on the boarding pass printing practices of individual airlines. Information requirements are explained in greater detail on Secure Flight’s web page.

John S. Pistole
TSA Administrator

Talk to TSA Logo
As part of the "Talk to TSA" initiative TSA reviews the questions and comments that come in and we plan to use the TSA blog to address some of the more common themes we are seeing - both the favorable and not so favorable. Security is a shared responsibility and we are always looking to hear from you.

75 comments:

Anonymous said...

Mr. Pistole if your check points are effective at preventing weapons and explosives from getting aboard aircraft I really fail to see the security benefit of an ID check.

Larry Seltzer said...

I've heard of problems because a middle name or initial is required on the boarding pass and some state IDs don't permit them (that could be vice-versa). Do TSA guidelines allow for such discrepancies or are people with this issue doomed to booking problems?

Al Ames said...

Translation: You must now have our permission to fly or you will not be issued a boarding pass.

Welcome to the new Amerika, Comrade.

Interesting ... my verification word is douse. And it's appropriate as TSA will douse yet another candle of freedom.

Al

Blogger Bob said...

Hi Larry. That was answered in the post, but I just pasted it here for you.

What if a passenger’s boarding pass and ID do not match exactly?

Secure Flight and travel document checking are both critical security functions, yet they serve different purposes at different points in the security process. Secure Flight is a behind-the-scenes watch list matching process that takes place before checkpoint screening. Secure Flight asks that passengers enter their name as it appears on their government ID and passengers should strive to stay consistent between the name on their ID and the information they provide when booking their reservation. Once a passenger receives their boarding pass, the Secure Flight process is already complete.

At the security checkpoint, TSA strives to ensure your identification and boarding pass are authentic and validate you are who you say you are. Small differences in the name on the boarding pass and ID, like middle initials, should not impact your travel. It is not uncommon for the information printed on boarding passes to differ slightly from the information on IDs, depending on the boarding pass printing practices of individual airlines.

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

Bob, can you explain why TSA thinks ID has any connection to security?

Adrian said...

As implemented, Secure Flight makes passengers less secure. It forces the to reveal sensitive, personal information to a third party (the airlines), without adequate protection on that information.

And it still doesn't close the print-your-own boarding pass loophole.

And it's implemented in a costly, complex manner instead of a straightforward one.

And it has never been satisfactorily explained how someone can be dangerous enough to ban from a flight but not be arrestable. Where is the due process here?

RB said...

Why does a persons identity matter if they are properly screened for WEI?

Having to obtain permission from government to travel is so against American standards as to be unbelievable.

TSA is apparently against freedom and the Constitution of the United States!

Jim Huggins said...

Is it just me, or does that last question not have an answer?

The question is: "what if a passenger's boarding pass and ID do not match exactly?"

As near as I can tell, the two paragraphs following says "small differences shouldn't matter". But that's not an answer. What if the TSO examining the ID decides the difference does matter? Will I miss my flight? (And who decides what a "small difference" is, anyways?)

Anonymous said...

What happens if you don't have a middle name?


Larry Seltzer said...
I've heard of problems because a middle name or initial is required on the boarding pass and some state IDs don't permit them (that could be vice-versa). Do TSA guidelines allow for such discrepancies or are people with this issue doomed to booking problems?

October 26, 2010 1:42 PM

Anonymous said...

small differences in the name on the boarding pass and ID, like middle initials, should not impact your travel.

Note that Bob said "should not", not "will not"

If TSO's were professional and well trained, the answer would be "will not".

Anonymous said...

Boarding passes don't have dates of birth, therefore, a knowing terrorist can simply buy a ticket giving a fake date of birth and then use his real ID at the checkpoint.

Very secure...

Shamino said...

A comment and a question.

To those concerned about minor differences in name spelling, why not just book your flight using the spelling/initials as they appear on your ID. Who cares if the spelling in the DMV's computer is different from what's printed on your license. The people at the airports are going to look at what's printed on your ID, not what's in the DMV computer.

And my question:

If you need to present ID in order to get a boarding pass, does this mean we can no longer check-in and print out passes at home over the internet?

Anonymous said...

Does the "Secure Flight" program require the various agencies that maintain watch lists to update the list entries to include a full legal name and birth date?

If not, how does this program (which will surely cause additional hassles to passengers) do anything to improve either security or screening efficiency?

(This is another one of many bothersome questions that the TSA will surely ignore, but I have to ask it.)

Anonymous said...

Jim Huggins said...
Is it just me, or does that last question not have an answer?
The question is: "what if a passenger's boarding pass and ID do not match exactly?"
As near as I can tell, the two paragraphs following says "small differences shouldn't matter". But that's not an answer.


Yes, exactly.

Will "Bob" have a problem with the TSA if his ID says "Robert"? Will Maria Conchita Alonzo Ferarro have a problem if her ID says "Maria Ferarro"? What about Mary Smyth-Chives, if her ID says "Mary Chives" or "Mary SmithChives" or Mary Smith Chives"? How about John Smith II vs. John Smith Jr.?

The question at hand goes a LOT further than 'Oops, he's missing his middle initial'.

And, as expected from the TSA, the 'answer' addresses none of that.

Anonymous said...

I have to admit the whole "what if a passenger's boarding pass and ID do not match exactly?" bothers me. My husband gives his full name when booking, yet several airlines only use his middle name, then don't leave a space, essentially changing his name to a female's name. He's hassled every time we fly.

In the last 12 flights, only one flight attendant saw it, commented on how it was stupid not to leave a space, and let him board. Everyone else, from the people at the ticket counter to duty free to the gate, always hassle him. Every time, he has to explain that the airline doesn't leave a space for a middle name.

Sure, it's only a few minutes, but those few minutes add up to a lot of aggravation when you're questioned about it several times on each leg of your flight.

Anonymous said...

Jim, that's the point! no clear rules means they make the rules! Why don't we ask BOB (I'm sure there's a blogger BOB...)why there haven't been any test to determine long term effects of the body scanners? The only published medical testing done on the long term effects show that once you enter the scanners you increase your risk of skin cancer and that your DNA won't necessarily replicate the same way ever again... http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1290527/Airport-body-scanners-deliver-radiation-dose-20-times-higher-thought.html We've let the terrorist win. They don't want to change us, they want our government to change us. 2,000 people killed during 9/11 now yields everyone that flies has increased their likelihood of skin cancer... Also remember when they weren't storing the images from the body scanner... oh wait that was a lie. Guarantee Blogger Bob doesn't respond and even if he does it'll just be some sort of double speak... ala above.

Anonymous said...

November 2nd should prove interesting with the hundreds, maybe thousands of people, turned away due to the small differences that "probably" won't matter. TV news organizations should have camera crews ready at major airports on that day. Should be interesting.

Anonymous said...

Working in the sort of position I do, I volunteer everything like flying that I do to the government anyway, and I'm fine with that - it's the tradeoff for doing to sort of work i do. However, I'm not comfortable with giving the same level of personal information to private companies against my will, and I don't see why I should have to - if the TSA security checkpoints screen out all the weapons, explosives, and other dangerous items, why should personal identification be of any interest to anyone? The unarmed potential terrorist is no more dangerous than anyone else unarmed.

Anonymous said...

Here's the question. For recruiters, they cannot ask for their personal information as it could be viewed as discrimination. So what to do? You can't ask the recruit to pay for the ticket, and agencies are requesting to have the information before they can issue the ticket. You would think that the gov't would have put processes in place for these types of things, and if they are out there people are unaware..

Anonymous said...

No more Orlando with kids for me. By the time the paperwork is figured out, the worry if some "T" was left uncrossed, we could be enjoying the local advantages.

I've figured out that I don't need to fly.

Chris Boyce said...

Anonymous, at October 26, 2010, on 4:39 PM said...
small differences in the name on the boarding pass and ID, like middle initials, should not impact your travel.

Note that Bob said "should not", not "will not"

If TSO's were professional and well trained, the answer would be "will not"."

If this were the case, there would not be an ID check at all, which serves no useful purpose other than to cast a huge dragnet for underage college kids, undocumented aliens, deadbeat dads, individuals with large amounts of cash, and the occasional pothead.

A previous TSA administrator said, "ID matters," and it was so without question or oversight.

We American people got what we deserved.

Anonymous said...

Mr Pistole, this is excessive and fails to improve security only increasing the discontent and fellings of government abuse of power. By all appearences, Europe is a much more liberty and freedom oriented location than our own United States. Sincerely,

Anonymous said...

Why was this posted with the label "Talk to TSA?" My understanding was that the "Talk to TSA" column would feature TSA responses to common questions and gripes. Rolling out a new program that no one has been asking seems more like a general announcement than an attempt at dialogue.

When will you describes the steps you take to discipline rude and abusive employees? Where is the long-awaited response to the Nature article? When will you tell us how to distinguish between sexual assault and your new "thorough" pat-downs?

Addison Pollock said...

I praise this Safe Flight action because it's an effort to unite individual airlines with safety as the number one priority. All passengers must give up a certain amount of freedom for security, but time is costly; therefore, it is imperative that security and background checks are efficient. The Secure Flight data requested is clear and simple which is the catalyst for its efficiency. The capability to match up someone with the watch list up until the flight is very impressive due to the copious amount of airline patrons.

In response to the minor credential differences, it is the passengers' responsibility to match his/her boarding pass with his/her ID. If a passenger is worried about missing his/her flight or other experiencing other complications due to the inconsistency then the matter should be handled before the flight date. Most airlines are understandable in this regards, but as one who travels you must follow guidelines as best as possible to make flying easy for everyone. I'm sure airport check-in services will anticipate problems due to those who place reservations for after Nov. 1 without data submitted to secure flight, but that will only last for so long. I will certainly feel safer flying with this in place.

Anonymous said...

Flying is a PRIVILEGE, not a RIGHT! If you do not wish to be subject to any sort of security screening in order to fly, then I suggest you bookmark the websites for AMTRAK and Greyhound.

bc2004 said...

Mr. Pollock says that it is the passenger's responsibility to ensure that the boarding pass matches the ID. Not so simple. I have flight reservations for 3 different trips on different airlines after 1 Nov 10. (My employer determines which airline I must use on each trip.) Although I have carefully submitted EXACTLY the same Secure ID information to each of the three airlines, my name appears differently in EACH of the three reservations. Moreover, I know from past experience that the boarding passes when printed will NOT match the record in the reservation. As an individual passenger, I have little or no power to force any of these airlines to change either their records of reservations nor the way they print boarding passes. Since I never see exactly what information each airline passes to TSA, I have no way of ensuring whether they are accurately passing along the Secure ID information that I gave to them. Even the most conscientious traveler is at risk of a mismatch.

Earl Pitts said...

@Anon: "Flying is a PRIVILEGE, not a RIGHT! If you do not wish to be subject to any sort of security screening in order to fly, then I suggest you bookmark the websites for AMTRAK and Greyhound."

I'm so tired of this argument as it shows a clear misunderstanding of what's involved.

First, the right to travel has been upheld in the courts. There isn't a restriction on the means. Additionally, I am free to buy a ticket on any common carrier for an agreed upon fare. The government is getting involved in that transaction and putting a lot more restrictions on it than necessary, including determining whether we even have permission to use the ticket thanks to "Secure"Flight.

Secondly, TSA is getting its paws into bus, train, and car travel, thanks to VIPR teams hitting up local and Greyhound stations, harassing people on Metros and Amtrak, and even working with a road block outside of Atlanta. Are you going to assert that the only right to travel is by what we can do with our own two feet?

Driving may be a privilege, but that's because I'm asking to operate a motor vehicle on a public road. There is no restriction on me riding as a passenger in a car, other than being permitted by the owner of the vehicle.

Lastly, I'm tired of the notion that people who complain about TSA don't want security. That's a straw man argument with no proof behind it. We want security. The problem is TSA isn't providing it.

Earl

Anonymous said...

"If you do not wish to be subject to any sort of security screening in order to fly, then I suggest you bookmark the websites for AMTRAK and Greyhound."

Wrong.

Your suggestion shows that you do not understand the scope of the TSA's activities.

The TSA can, and has, done screening on both rail and bus.

Ayn R. Key said...

Anonymous TSO wrote:
Flying is a PRIVILEGE, not a RIGHT! If you do not wish to be subject to any sort of security screening in order to fly, then I suggest you bookmark the websites for AMTRAK and Greyhound.

Go back to high school civics.

The right to contract is long standing, and that is exactly what a plane ticket is. It is a private contract between the purchaser and the airline. There is no right to force them to sell, true, but if they agree to sell and you agree to buy then you have contract. The role of the government is to safeguard the sanctity of the contract.

No third party has the right to interfere with a private contract. If I enter into a contract to sell you my car, then nobody outside of the two of us has the right to say "you cannot do that because I say so."

Third Party Interference ia a violation of the sanctity of the contract. The government is supposed to protect the sanctity of the contract. The TSA violates the sanctity of the contract by determining whether or not the airline and the traveler can fulfill their contract with each other.

Moreover the right of travel was considered so basic that, while included in the Articles of Confederation, was considered too basic to be included in the Constitution. It has roots going back to the Magna Carta, and is one of the basic principles of Anglo Common Law, a tradition underlying much of United States jurisprudence.

So, based upon right of travel and right of contract, we can derive a right to fly. There is no absolute right to fly, but there is a derived right to fly. If the government was acting in a manner in accordance with the constitution it would protect that right to fly, but instead of the constitution we have TSOs like yourself who, if you consider the constitution at all, consider it an impediment to the job that must bne ignored.

If you really feel that you cannot safely fly unless I am strip searched and molested, unless my rights are violated, well, you believe you have nor right to fly, so you should stay home. You can always take the bus.

Anonymous said...

There is no way my full name will fit on a boarding pass or online airline reservation.

Jim Huggins said...

Anonymous writes: Flying is a PRIVILEGE, not a RIGHT! If you do not wish to be subject to any sort of security screening in order to fly, then I suggest you bookmark the websites for AMTRAK and Greyhound.

Sorry ... TSA is starting to show up at Amtrak and Greyhound terminals, too. Can't count on being able to avoid TSA that way.

Anonymous said...

False bravado. Writers to this blog sound so brave. If point of fact, if it were not for TSA and other government agencies the whole Western civilization would soon collapse. "Rights" and "freedom" are bandied about as if they mean something.

Most sensible thinking people would rather live in a jail cell than live in fear of death by terrorists.

My advice? Do what the government people tell you to do without whining about your "rights and freedoms" - "rights and freedoms died on 9/11. We have a New World Order.

TSM/West said...

Ayn R Key said
The right to contract is long standing, and that is exactly what a plane ticket is. It is a private contract between the purchaser and the airline. There is no right to force them to sell, true, but if they agree to sell and you agree to buy then you have contract. The role of the government is to safeguard the sanctity of the contract.
-----------------------------------
You are absolutely right. But in order for the contract to be valid and upheld both parties must fulfill the requirements of the contract.
The only way you can fulfill the requirements of a contract with a commercial airline is to undergo the scereening procedures. Once you do that you are free to travel anywhere the contract says you can.

Ayn also said
If you really feel that you cannot safely fly unless I am strip searched and molested, unless my rights are violated, well, you believe you have nor right to fly, so you should stay home. You can always take the bus.
-----------------------------------
When the judge found in favor of your argument during your civil rights case did he instruct TSA to change the way they screen you. Oh wait you never sued. Therefore your claim of your rights being violated are just that an unfounded claim. Take TSA to court and prove your theory.

Anonymous said...

My name as it appears on my passport has foreign characters that do not exist for US-based airlines. How am I supposed to match my passport name with my boarding pass??

I guess I can always photoshop the boarding pass I print at home.

But then, how does checking names on passes against documents help with security??

Anonymous said...

You people are disgusting and what you have done to this contry is horrible.

Do you enjoy patting down small children's genitals? Are you pedophiles.

If you try to strong arm me with a pat down because I won't go through your nudity machine, I'll scream bloody rape.

Anonymous said...

What happens when the name and gender on the ID is wrong?

Your friend, Ethel said...

An anonymous person wrote:

"False bravado. Writers to this blog sound so brave. If point of fact, if it were not for TSA and other government agencies the whole Western civilization would soon collapse. "Rights" and "freedom" are bandied about as if they mean something.

Most sensible thinking people would rather live in a jail cell than live in fear of death by terrorists.

My advice? Do what the government people tell you to do without whining about your "rights and freedoms" - "rights and freedoms died on 9/11. We have a New World Order."

I hope you stay holed up in your house 24/7. The chances of your dying from a whole number of things from auto accidents, to a fall in your house and yes, even to murder by an unknown person, are so much greater than the chances of your ever dying from a terrorist attack make your statements simply laughable.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
False bravado. Writers to this blog sound so brave. If point of fact, if it were not for TSA and other government agencies the whole Western civilization would soon collapse. "Rights" and "freedom" are bandied about as if they mean something.

Most sensible thinking people would rather live in a jail cell than live in fear of death by terrorists.
----------------------------------
My advice? Do what the government people tell you to do without whining about your "rights and freedoms" - "rights and freedoms died on 9/11. We have a New World Order.
===================================

.....................
I truly hope you said the above to point out just how damaging TSA is to the United States.

If not we are in far deeper trouble than I thought possible.

Anonymous said...

There can be no discussion about the need for security. As I write this explosive devices sent by terrorists from Yemen are flying over our heads in airplanes. One terrorist is arrested. The news gets worse and worse. Fear stalks the land.

How can any reasonable person argue about ID or searches at a time like this? I favor strip searches with body cavity checks for all passengers, workers and crew. Arrest anyone without proper ID. Let the courts sort them out.

We've been too easy on terrorists in this country.

Anonymous said...

Enjoy continuing your "Security Theater", TSA.

You invade our privacy more and more, and erode our rights continuously, all in the name of supposed "security".

What it is, is FALSE security. It is only a sense, only a facade of security. It is nothing more than a mere intent to make us FEEL more secure, when we really know that if terrorists really want to accomplish something, they'll do it - ***military personnel have already come out and said that terrorists often use body cavities to hide items. Well, all of these new techniques aren't going to help that.***

Genital-brushing pat-downs and genital-viewing scanner technology are the two newest lows you've introduced.

I'm at the point where I'll probably never fly again. I hope you guys make it so annoying to fly that the airlines die off.

We are slowly losing our last few rights and freedoms in America. Sure, we aren't in the dire shape that other countries are - but if we keep telling ourselves "we're still the better country, we still have freedoms" - the whole time we're convincing ourselves of this - is a perfect distraction for them to continue taking our freedoms away.

In America, you have the freedom to be subject to pat-downs and security scanners. You have the freedom to pay as much taxes as you want, especially to keep your house, something you supposedly own. You have the freedom to vote for liars, both Democrats and Republicans. You have the freedom for the government to mandate whatever it wishes on your life. You have the freedom to do things the government's way.

Haha, freedom, it's becoming a joke. Before you know it, it'll be history. A mere idea of something that once was - or maybe only falsely existed anyway. Maybe we've never been free, we've only been convinced we are.

Anonymous said...

As an immigration adviser for a university, I need to know how we advise our international students and scholars on the proper way to purchase their ticket if they have only one name in the given name or surname section of their passport. For these purposes, should they enter FNU (first name unknown) or LNU, enter the same name in both first and last, or leave one name section blank (not always an option). If they leave a blank section, does it always need to be the first name that's blank. When I last tried to look, DOS naming standards were being revised and were unavailable online. Please advise.

Anonymous said...

I work in a shipping department and things have been tightened up!
Our air freight packers are in a secured area and only certain people are allowed within those confines.I am concerned about air freight, in light of the recent shipments from Dubai. FEDX and UPS both pick up freight from individuals. there does not seem to be a safeguard of what is put in those "self packages." TSA is a pain to deal with when traveling but when your plane disentegrates at 30,000 ft there is no place to go. Not all air freight goes on freight only flights. Much of this freight goes on passenger airlines.

Cliff C

Anonymous said...

One of these days, maybe all of the systems will be able to handle someone who has two middle names. *sigh* Until then, my name gets completely garbled by airlines etc. and god only knows what name the TSA is actually comparing against.

Ayn R. Key said...

Ayn R. Key wrote:
The right to contract is long standing, and that is exactly what a plane ticket is. It is a private contract between the purchaser and the airline. There is no right to force them to sell, true, but if they agree to sell and you agree to buy then you have contract. The role of the government is to safeguard the sanctity of the contract.

TSM west wrote:
You are absolutely right. But in order for the contract to be valid and upheld both parties must fulfill the requirements of the contract.
The only way you can fulfill the requirements of a contract with a commercial airline is to undergo the scereening procedures. Once you do that you are free to travel anywhere the contract says you can.


Only because the TSA insists that I must undergo the screening procedure in order to fulfill the requirements of the contract, making that third person interference.

I hereby decree that I have a say in your employment contract with the TSA, and that you must submit to me 10% of your pay. By your logic, my statement is valid.

Ayn R. Key wrote:
If you really feel that you cannot safely fly unless I am strip searched and molested, unless my rights are violated, well, you believe you have nor right to fly, so you should stay home. You can always take the bus.

TSM West wrote:
When the judge found in favor of your argument during your civil rights case did he instruct TSA to change the way they screen you. Oh wait you never sued. Therefore your claim of your rights being violated are just that an unfounded claim. Take TSA to court and prove your theory.

How oblivious do you have to be to not see that I'm mocking the most common pro-TSA argument, that we don't have to fly if we don't like the security procedures. Well, if you don't like a lack of security procedurse, you don't have to fly. If you don't feel safe unless I'm irradiated, strip searched, and molested, you have the ability to stay home. You don't have to fly. By your logic you don't even have any right to travel.

Instead you invoke the Nuremberg defense. Again. You know how I feel about the Nuremberg defense, and I know how you feel about me calling you on it. You hate being compared to Nazis whose only crime was to follow orders, because you are only following orders.

RB said...

The big unanswered question is why does identity matter if each person is properly screened for WEI.

Just why won't TSA address that question?

Saying identity matters is not an answer.

And while TSA is wasting billions of dollars on screening people they have yet to directly screen all cargo that gets loaded onto aircraft and as illustrated by recent events it seems that is where the real threats come from.

Why has TSA rebuked the Congressional mandate of 100% cargo screening? Letting some other entity do the screening doesn't cut it. Why are we paying for some 60,000 plus TSA employees when they don't even do the basics?

I say we are being robbed blind by TSA!

TSA do your job and quit the feel up assaults on citizens.

Anonymous said...

Question: My wife still has a passport with her maiden name but her driver's license has her married name. Would she have trouble flying out of the country if we booked tickets with her maiden name and used only her passport as ID during the trip?

Granny Miller said...

The TSA is a national disgrace.

I'm living for the day when ALL you folks at the TSA finally get a pink slip from the American Taxpayer.
The People are not going to put up with your shenanigans for too much longer.

Blah_Blah_Blah said...


There can be no discussion about the need for security. As I write this explosive devices sent by terrorists from Yemen are flying over our heads in airplanes. One terrorist is arrested. The news gets worse and worse. Fear stalks the land.

How can any reasonable person argue about ID or searches at a time like this? I favor strip searches with body cavity checks for all passengers, workers and crew. Arrest anyone without proper ID. Let the courts sort them out.

We've been too easy on terrorists in this country.

October 31, 2010 7:29 PM

---------------------------------

I find it ironic the day that this "plot" came to light is the same day all these new procedures (InSecure Flight, Gropings, etc)begin as well. It smacks of the Bush era were the threat level was ramped up right before a election or major holiday to keep the sheep scared.


Under what charge for not having a ID? there is no law that says one has to have any form of ID. Are you also stating that you dont have a problem trampling on the rights of others, but you have no problems giving your up. alot of irony there. A line from the great patriot Ben Franklin comes to mind from your ramblings.

your wrong on this country being easy on terrorists, its just that the show that has been put on is all fluff and no substance.

Anonymous said...

The dissent has to be nipped in the bud. It isn't so hard to do what you are told. It's for your own good. Travel is a privilege granted by the government so any rules or restrictions by the TSA is valid. So line up and submit the information called for. Don't be like the airline pilot that will likely lose his job and get on a no fly list because wanted to march to a different drum.

Let's all pitch in to help our elected leaders out here.

Anonymous said...

The TSA is a waste of our money. Secure the borders then we will talk about airport security.

Anonymous said...

Which law requires that I provide my ID to the TSA before I'm allowed to board a commercial passenger aircraft?

bc2004 said...

TSA: Please explain why if the Secure ID information is good enough to determine whether a passenger is NOT allowed to print a boarding pass, why is it necessary to take the time to check the boarding pass against the photo ID? What additional security does this step add? As many commenters have noted, the format that airlines use do not match from airline to airline. The name as it is printed on the boarding pass does not always match the Secure ID information (character for character) even when the passenger provided the information correctly. So, the second check (boarding pass against ID) creates a risk for passengers (that the airline format is not a good enough match to the photo ID and the passenger may not pass document control). What is the offsetting benefit of this second check?

Anonymous said...

"The People are not going to put up with your shenanigans for too much longer."

I haven't noticed any drop in air travel. I haven't noticed any elected standing up for passenger rights.

Get over it, TSA is here to stay. People want security over privacy.

Robert Johnson said...

Quote from Anomymous: "I haven't noticed any drop in air travel. I haven't noticed any elected standing up for passenger rights."

Just because planes are full doesn't mean there hasn't been a drop. Airlines have been cutting capacity for quite awhile. They're using either smaller planes, less frequent service, or a combination of both. I can tell you that there aren't near the options there used to be, even flying to airline hub airports. And what is there is more expensive.

"Get over it, TSA is here to stay. People want security over privacy."

And TSA provides and recognizes neither.

Robert

Anonymous said...

"The dissent has to be nipped in the bud. It isn't so hard to do what you are told. It's for your own good. Travel is a privilege granted by the government so any rules or restrictions by the TSA is valid. So line up and submit the information called for. Don't be like the airline pilot that will likely lose his job and get on a no fly list because wanted to march to a different drum.

Let's all pitch in to help our elected leaders out here."

Nice troll there.

Anonymous said...

I haven't noticed any drop in air travel. I haven't noticed any elected standing up for passenger rights.

Get over it, TSA is here to stay. People want security over privacy.


Too bad they are getting neither.

Anonymous said...

Earl said:
"Lastly, I'm tired of the notion that people who complain about TSA don't want security. That's a straw man argument with no proof behind it. We want security. The problem is TSA isn't providing it."
Please explain what your idea of security is and what the tsa is doing wrong. im sure that you have a vast background in national security so i value your opinions.

Andrew said...

What is the standard of notification required to offer a traveler regarding the right to opt out of irradiation?

My first experience with the full body scanner was one demonstrating a complete lack of notification of the device used, the physical exposure scalars and my ability to not accept the radiation for whatever reason I may have.

I am obligated to keep an updated MSDS for Elmer's glue on a job site to inform of the risks of exposure to it, why as a traveler do I not deserve the regard to be informed of irradiation (presence and scalars of exposure) and the notice of my choice and time to opt for an alternate inspection without punitive recourse?

Anonymous said...

"I haven't noticed any drop in air travel. I haven't noticed any elected standing up for passenger rights.

Get over it, TSA is here to stay. People want security over privacy."

I haven't flown in a commercial aircraft in over 3 years, and I have no plans to fly commercially until TSAs present course is history.

Karl said...

Are people with gate passes subject to Secure Flight as well?

Ryan said...

This Secure Flight program is a joke, all a terrorist needs is a fake id and a fake boarding pass to get past the initial security screener.

They then board the plane using the real boarding pass they bought under someone else's real name & goverment ID.

The security screeners need a method of verifying that actual boarding passes and ID's are legit. Right now they just glance that the name matches the name on your ID and the picture on your id matches your face. I've seen better security for buying beer at the liquor store with the ID card scan machines.

The screeners need to be able to scan a boarding pass, and have the airline computers verify that it is real and original. Then they need to scan ID's into a computer and have the State DMV verify they are legit with photo. In case of a passport, then a passport photo should show up on the screen. If the person is an OUS citizen, the foriegn country's passport computer needs to be connected.

Later after getting past security, ID's need to be checked again at the gate so that the same person is getting on the right plane.

Anonymous said...

Just returned from Amsterdam. No body imaging available at the gate thus my female colleague and had the mandated body pat down. Compared to recent screenings in the U.S., it was done in the most insensitive and rude fashion; I was very uncomfortable having my groin checked in the most detailed manner -- but the extended fondling and cupping of my colleague's breasts (she was wearing a tight t-shirt) was absolutely outrageous. Upon my complaints, security informed me this was a tsa requirement and mandated. I travel substantially -- and have gone through thousands of security screenings -- but this behavior is completely unacceptable. It appears something is lost in the translation between the US and foreign security services that are contracted for security.

Anonymous said...

The very fact that times are so dangerous that these measures are necessary has convinced me never to fly again. No security measures can stop anyone who is planning a terror attack from attempting his or her mission.. If our officials are so convinced that a terrorist attack will happen that they spend millions of dollars on machines that cannot even detect internal cavity explosive devices. I think that leisure flying is out for me. To make us safe from terrorists plots we would all have to go through pre-flight MRIs. I'm through.

Anonymous said...

The security measures at airports have now reached a level that the public will no longer passively tolerate. In the past, air security programs dating back to the 60s were scaled back or discontinued for two reasons: the airlines were paying for them in past years and finally decided enough was enough and secondly the people had had enough.
This time the taxpayers are footing the bill and TSA are government employees. TSA had better start exercising some restraint and common sense. Can you say: Reduction in Force? I'm speaking as a former Customs Air Security Officer who was RIFd after people decided we were more trouble than we were worth.

SSSS said...

Who Watches the Watchmen?

Anonymous said...

I understand security is important. It should not done at the expense of people will and liberty. TSA shall start using common sense to implement security measures at airports. TSA personnel should not be be allowed to see the naked body or groupe the passengers in the airport.

Ken said...

I cannot find on the TSA website the definition and/or explanation of what a "pat-down" is and entails. The public (and I) need and deserve an explanation of what this is and if genitalia are indeed touched or felt.

Anonymous said...

I am a lifelong computer expert and if you "really want to get rid of the complaints about storing info than dont put a hard drive in the thing - simple as that - i know you will not because even though you claim not to store info- i notice that you mention that "you" dont store info - no mention of anyone else storing it. I was not born yesterday. Just stop the lies - simple

Nancy Peske said...

I am concerned about whether ALL children under 12 or over 12 will be subject to AIT or a pat-down. I am an advocate for children with sensory processing disorder, a hidden disability that most children with autism have and which affects 1 in 20 kids. Our kids are often VERY anxious about transitions, busy environments, and unfamiliar experiences. Please let me & my blog followers know: Will ALL children be required to be screened or experience a pat-down (modified possible for children under 12)?
Nancy Peske
http://www.sensorysmartparent.wordpress.com

Anonymous said...

I travel 50-60 times per year for business and while i prefer the "old" days, I'm under no illusion that the safety of all should be sacrificed for my convenience.

To the media and those feeding the frenzy, stop being so self-centered and move on through the line! The TSA is just doing what they can to keep the planes safe (a part of the story that seems to be frequently overlooked).

Jeff

Anonymous said...

When a TSA personnel travels do they have to go through the same security procedures as law abiding citizens are do they just show their pass and bypass the scans and pat downs?

Anonymous said...

It seems very odd that one of the only two extra pieces of information TSA requires for secure flight is gender. Requiring people to record their gender is quite sexist. Obviously it is unacceptable to ask for race so why does TSA think it is ok to ask that we record our gender? There is really no need for people to record their gender. There is no justification for TSA collecting that piece of information. Its fairly obvious upon meeting someone in most cases. All government IDs clearly state gender and any TSA agent at an airport can just refer to the ID if needed.

Emma Rose said...

The very fact that times are so dangerous that these measures are necessary has convinced me never to fly again. No security measures can stop anyone who is planning a terror attack from attempting his or her mission...

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Anonymous said...

I just booked at ticket for my husband using PAT however his drivers license says PATRICK. Will this be an issue?
Thank you.