Thursday, April 22, 2010

Traveling With Airbags

People have been traveling with airbags lately. No, not their co-workers or annoying neighbors, but actual automobile airbags... You’re probably asking the same thing I asked. Why? Well…I have learned that airbags are extremely expensive to replace once they’ve been deployed. And they’re even more expensive in Europe, so people are buying them here in the U.S. and putting them in their checked baggage and carry-on luggage to avoid shipping costs. (Mostly checked baggage)

What’s the big deal you might ask? According to the FAA Office of Security and Hazardous Material, airbag actuators are on the list of hazardous materials and are prohibited from transport aboard passenger aircraft. (Who knew???) Take a look here to see how airbags are inflated. (Similar to a solid rocket booster) Even though it will be more expensive to ship, it will save you a lot of hassle in the end.

Disclaimer: Co-workers or annoying neighbors may be referred to as airbags, but they are not considered hazmat.

You can also read about this over at the Autoblog, a blog that obsessively covers the auto industry!

Thanks,

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

65 comments:

FriendlySkies said...

Puff Post!

Anonymous said...

What's the name and contact information for your direct supervisor, Bob?

Anonymous said...

Funny how this post went up after everyone justly tore into Bob for his deliberate deception in the prior post!

Anonymous said...

Bob, does the fact that TSA is finding these items indicate that people only started carrying them when virtual strip-searches started, or that people carried them for years before virtual strip-searches with no ill effects on any flight?

How many harmless items, like private medical devices, have these items detected?

How are alarms that are the result of a harmless medical item like a prosthetic breast or adult diaper resolved?

Is TSA tracking the number of harmless items that alarm the virtual strip-search devices?

What steps is TSA taking to secure the belongings of individuals it virtually strip-searches?

What steps is TSA taking to ensure every passenger knows they are not required to be virtually strip-searched?

How many countries force every air passenger to remove their shoes for screening?

Why does the previous post open with a picture of a large knife when the only knife you can claim to have found is a three-inch pocketknife that can harm no one?

TSOWilliamReed said...

first! I never knew airbags were deployed using explosives till after working this job. Found that out during my basic training 2 years ago.

Anonymous said...

Bob:
Please provide the name and contact information of your supervisor. You have been asked to provide this information numerous times over the past several months. You have completely ignored these requests. This is unacceptable behavior from a public servant.

Anonymous said...

Just curious if angry spouses are covered by the disclaimer... I have known them to be hazardous, perhaps not mat but surely hazardous.

Anonymous said...

Neither TSOWilliamReed nor I can be put in checked luggage? :)

Anonymous said...

Is this more smoke screening to shift the focus away from yet another TSA problem story that cropped up.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2011663160_airmarshal22m.html?prmid=related_stories_section


geez it seems like more FAMs are being arrested then people there arresting.

Alot of good background checks do. So Bob when will every person(passengers, ramp rats, concession workers, TSA EMPLOYEES or object (bag, overpriced water, etc) be searched/ screeened everytime they enter the sterile area.


Waiting for a answer bob, as the number of breaches by TSA employees alone are 20 pages.

Anonymous said...

No airbags.

Well, that means most of the Anons and many of the signed posters here would not be permitted in checked baggage. :)

RB said...

"About this Blog
This blog is sponsored by the Transportation Security Administration to facilitate an ongoing dialogue on innovations in security, technology and the checkpoint screening process."

Just when will the dialogue start?

Or is TSA's definition of dialogue one sided lecturing instead of two way communication?

The blog seems to have plenty of time to post new articles but never enough time to engage and answer old questions.

I really doubt there are very many cases of people traveling with airbags and this is not a big issue.

Why won't TSA address some real issues like:

Releasing WBI images in the same size/resolution as seen by operators? People have the right to know what the screening method they are subjected to amd are being asked to accept.

Why is TSA buying Backscatter WBI's that knowingly emit potentially dangerous radiation when MMW machines do not?

When will travelers get a concise set of rules they must comply with to transit a TSA checkpoint that can be referenced when poorly trained TSA employees step over the line?

When will TSA correct the information for travelers that states ice is only for travelers with special needs/medical conditions while claiming it pertains to all travelers?

I could go on but I suspect it would only be a waste of time given the responsiveness of TSA to date!

Anonymous said...

They used to contain lead azide, a low intensity explosive.

Anonymous said...

TSOWilliamReed said...
first!

a.) Juvenile
b.) Sooo last millenium

c.) Wrong.

Again.

Anonymous said...

Bob, does the fact that TSA is finding these items indicate that people only started carrying them when virtual strip-searches started, or that people carried them for years before virtual strip-searches with no ill effects on any flight?

~~~~~~~~~~

I would think that they are carrying them in their bags not around their necks like Flavor Flav necklaces. And our bags are all "strip searched" in an x-ray. hahaha

Anonymous said...

OK, so airbags have explosives and I can't take them with me. Fine. I have no need to travel with airbags.

But water is not explosive. I am not allowed to travel with water. How about ending that stupid rule?

Patrick (BOS TSO) said...

FriendlySkies said...
Puff Post!


Not really. There's been few documented cases of airbags being transported in baggage the past few weeks.

Unfortunately, that's all I'm at liberty to say.

Anonymous said...

Now I know to leave the airbags in my car when I travel by air. Thank you TSA.

TSOWilliamReed said...

Anonymous said...
TSOWilliamReed said...
first!

a.) Juvenile
b.) Sooo last millenium

c.) Wrong.

Again.

April 22, 2010 6:08 PM
------------

Doh foiled again.

Dave Nelson said...

"Patrick (BOS TSO) said...
FriendlySkies said...
Puff Post!

Not really. There's been few documented cases of airbags being transported in baggage the past few weeks.

Unfortunately, that's all I'm at liberty to say.

April 22, 2010 9:22 PM"

Patrick, while you are hiding behind the SSI conspiracy theory house of cards, I will simply state that the pyrotechnic initiators in airbags are designed to activate gas generators, which release compressed gas stored in a small volume under high pressure in fractions of a second in order to inflate the airbag. The gas also heats up when it expands (high school physics at work), which is why some people experience first-degree burns when an airbag deploys during a collision. Except for the pressure and volume of gas being higher, it operated exactly like a BB gun or a pneumatic nailer. It's not an explosion. It's a rapid expansion of stored gas.

So, to imply that someone is "smuggling" airbags as a means to hide explosives detonators is simply absurd.

The airbag is considered hazardous cargo because it contains gas under very high pressure -- not because of explosives. The FAA flight safety people ban airbags, not the TSA.

In case you don't know, for years, the FAA also bans spray starch in checked or carry-on luggage because it's flammable.

Anonymous said...

I can live without airbags while flying, but I really would like to be able to take the toothpaste of my choice. Stop the war on toothpaste.

TSOWilliamReed said...

Dave Nelson said...
"Patrick (BOS TSO) said...
FriendlySkies said...
Puff Post!

Not really. There's been few documented cases of airbags being transported in baggage the past few weeks.

Unfortunately, that's all I'm at liberty to say.

April 22, 2010 9:22 PM"

Patrick, while you are hiding behind the SSI conspiracy theory house of cards, I will simply state that the pyrotechnic initiators in airbags are designed to activate gas generators, which release compressed gas stored in a small volume under high pressure in fractions of a second in order to inflate the airbag. The gas also heats up when it expands (high school physics at work), which is why some people experience first-degree burns when an airbag deploys during a collision. Except for the pressure and volume of gas being higher, it operated exactly like a BB gun or a pneumatic nailer. It's not an explosion. It's a rapid expansion of stored gas.

So, to imply that someone is "smuggling" airbags as a means to hide explosives detonators is simply absurd.

The airbag is considered hazardous cargo because it contains gas under very high pressure -- not because of explosives. The FAA flight safety people ban airbags, not the TSA.

In case you don't know, for years, the FAA also bans spray starch in checked or carry-on luggage because it's flammable.

April 23, 2010 10:56 AM
---------------

For clarification, the airbag is designated hazmat for the pressurized gas yes but the initiator in every airbag is an explosive detenator, a small one yes but they don't have to be big to start an explosion.

Anonymous said...

TSOWilliamReed:

The main ingrediant to an airbag is sodium azide. A toxic substance. When it is detonated in the presence of other chemicals it generates a large amount of nitrogen gas. There is no bottle of compressed air, just chemicals.

RB said...

Patrick (BOS TSO) said...
FriendlySkies said...
Puff Post!

Not really. There's been few documented cases of airbags being transported in baggage the past few weeks.

Unfortunately, that's all I'm at liberty to say.

April 22, 2010 9:22 PM
...........
Have there been so many cases that it really deserved its on blog entry?

Why not answer some of the hundreds (perhaps thousands now) that have gone unanswered since the blog started?

Bob?

NoClu said...

I can see that airbags must have been popping like mushrooms in springtime.

Thanks for the warning to all trying to smuggle one of these to Europe. We are now better informed.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
TSOWilliamReed:

The main ingrediant to an airbag is sodium azide. A toxic substance. When it is detonated in the presence of other chemicals it generates a large amount of nitrogen gas. There is no bottle of compressed air, just chemicals.

April 23, 2010 12:25 PM
....................
Other than scaring the crap out of people what would be hurt if one of these bags went off in an airplane?

Nitrogen gas is inert & the bag deflates quickly.

Ayn R. Key said...

You know, anonymous, I've asked Bob for his supervisor's contact information as well, but every time I do so he disallows the comment.

Anonymous said...

You regulars and trolls need a new hobby (RB)... Bob-bashers..

Anonymous said...

Oh lordie! Annon still going on with that 'take me to your leader' stuff. LOL Give it a rest will ya?

I have actually seen an airbag come down in baggage. They can be seriously dangerous. Please folks, make other arrangements for these items.

Ronnie
TSO DEN

TSOWilliamReed said...

RB said...
Patrick (BOS TSO) said...
FriendlySkies said...
Puff Post!

Not really. There's been few documented cases of airbags being transported in baggage the past few weeks.

Unfortunately, that's all I'm at liberty to say.

April 22, 2010 9:22 PM
...........
Have there been so many cases that it really deserved its on blog entry?

Why not answer some of the hundreds (perhaps thousands now) that have gone unanswered since the blog started?

Bob?

April 23, 2010 12:24 PM
----------------

Because they have all been answered and you didn't like the answers you got. Airbags have been showing up a lot recently probably due to all the vehicle recalls that have been going on.

Patrick (BOS TSO) said...

Dave Nelson said...
Patrick, while you are hiding behind the SSI conspiracy theory house of cards...


Actually, in this case it was U//FOUO information, which even though it's unclassified I'm technically prohibited from releasing it publicly if I feel like keeping my job.

But, other than that... your post was wholly on the spot. I just can't say the circumstances of what brought Bob to write the post because 1) it's FOUO material and 2) I'm not Bob, but it would be nice to be him.

Anonymous said...

So we started a fight against terror, that quickly turned into a fight against water (yea, we all know water is really evil) and arrived now at the fight against airbags.

Great job! While I agree that carrying airbags on a plane is incredibly stupid, it's by far not what we have to be afraid of.

Bob, on December 23rd 2009 in a rainy landing a plane slid off the landing strip in Jamaica, broke into three pieces and injured many people.
What is done now to prevent rain?

(I'm asking to contrast a real and concrete threat to civil aviation against all kinds of things you guys dream up that never have and probably never will be an issue).

TSO Colyn said...

Howdy Folx!

I'd just like to clarify a few things from some people who may become confused by reading the comments on this blog post...

The airbag's bob is referring to are an explosive device, and are therefore prohibited from passenger transport. This decision was made in the best interests of the traveling public. We at TSA care very much for your safety!

For anyone seeking information on the AIT (formerly known as WBI) you may refer to other posts by bob on the TSA blog.

As always, I hope all of you have safe travels!! I can't wait to help you at the checkpoint!

Isaac Newton said...

TSO William Reed said...
RB said...

Why not answer some of the hundreds (perhaps thousands now) that have gone unanswered since the blog started?

----------------

Because they have all been answered and you didn't like the answers you got. Airbags have been showing up a lot recently probably due to all the vehicle recalls that have been going on.


Not all answered, William, not by a long shot.

For example, we're still waiting for you to provide the list of "hundreds of items" that can be hidden inside a shoe but not in a body cavity that could bring down an airplane.

We're still waiting to find out what happens "if I alarm the ETD". Note that "something will happen" is not an answer.

We're still waiting to find out how false alarms in the WBI due to adult diapers, sanitary items, and medical devices will be cleared. Note that "something will happen" is not an answer.

We're still waiting to hear what the BDO program costs and how many terrorists it has caught.

We're still waiting to find out why TSA is implementing potentially harmful backscatter x-ray WBI instead of harmless MMW.

There are more, but these would do for a start.

Isaac Newton said...

Bob, I understand that airbags could be quite a problem on an aircraft. So how do we know that there aren't airbags in the tons of UNSCREENED cargo still being carried on passenger aircraft?

Anonymous said...

TSOWilliamReed said...

Because they have all been answered and you didn't like the answers you got. Airbags have been showing up a lot recently probably due to all the vehicle recalls that have been going on.

**********************************

Do you guys just make this stuff up as you go along?

Vehicle airbags get directly replaced by a consumer after a deployment on an un-insured vehicle, or when one doesn't want to turn in a claim.

In a recall, one takes their vehicle directly to a dealer, and the manufacturer replaces the airbag at their cost. I can guarantee you that the OEMs are not using their employees to ship airbags around in checked baggage.

No offense, but it amazes me how many topics some TSOs are suddenly experts on.

Anonymous said...

TSOWilliamReed said...

"Airbags have been showing up a lot recently probably due..."

So you don't really know any facts about this. Do you?

You have posted passionate replies to things that showed you had not read the post.

You have 'backed up' other statements of yours by telling us you "guess" something to support your questionable assertions.

Now, again, you post when you have _no_ facts.

The facts to nonsense ratio is already low on the blog.

Please try to add actual substance to the debate.

Anonymous said...

TSOWilliamReed said...

"Airbags have been showing up a lot recently probably due to all the vehicle recalls that have been going on."

Could you please explain what connection you see between recalls and airbags in luggage?

Please?

Anonymous said...

David Nelson said:

The gas also heats up when it expands (high school physics at work), which is why some people experience first-degree burns when an airbag deploys during a collision. Except for the pressure and volume of gas being higher, it operated exactly like a BB gun or a pneumatic nailer. It's not an explosion. It's a rapid expansion of stored gas.

April 23, 2010 10:56 AM
_______________________

Apparently someone failed high school physics.

Simply put, an explosive is a material that rapidly converts from a solid to a rapidly expanding gas (sublimation). It is the pressure from this rapidly expanding gas that generates the destructive power of the explosion.

So to imply an airbag isn't dangerous or hazardous because it works by using a rapid expansion of gas is...well...ignorant.

Also, as others have pointed out, airbags do not use a compressed gas cylinder, but a small 'gas generator' propellant charge (i.e. explosive). Since explosives are universally considered HAZMAT, I'm not sure why you take such exception to the FAA banning them aboard aircraft. Even if they are not powerful enough to take down an aircraft, I wouldn't want my checked baggage damaged because another passenger decided to put a couple airbags in his luggage.

Anonymous said...

"Even though it will be more expensive to ship, it will save you a lot of hassle in the end."

Yeah, that way it can go in the belly of the plane as cargo! Suddenly it's not dangerous anymore ...

LTSO with Answers said...

But water is not explosive. I am not allowed to travel with water. How about ending that stupid rule?

Please don't start a liquids debate. That is a very long conversation in its own and it is very hard to try and get people to understand. There is lots of information about it on this blog and other sources.

LTSO with Answers said...

RB said...

"About this Blog
This blog is sponsored by the Transportation Security Administration to facilitate an ongoing dialogue on innovations in security, technology and the checkpoint screening process."

Just when will the dialogue start?

Or is TSA's definition of dialogue one sided lecturing instead of two way communication?

The blog seems to have plenty of time to post new articles but never enough time to engage and answer old questions.


I see mostly on this blog a forum for complaining, venting and such and as a way of educating passengers. Most of you who blog seem to not like most answers given and such so a lot of the time is spent debating something instead of talking about it to make it better. Still this is good communication in my opinion. I want the public to try and understand things better but sometimes that is very difficult.

I really doubt there are very many cases of people traveling with airbags and this is not a big issue.

Bob is simply putting out there what has been some recent activity of what is going on in our(TSA) world.

Why won't TSA address some real issues like:

Releasing WBI images in the same size/resolution as seen by operators? People have the right to know what the screening method they are subjected to amd are being asked to accept.


I thought Bob posted this already. I saw it did you? Or do you just not believe the post?

Why is TSA buying Backscatter WBI's that knowingly emit potentially dangerous radiation when MMW machines do not?

I skip this. Not my expertise.

When will travelers get a concise set of rules they must comply with to transit a TSA checkpoint that can be referenced when poorly trained TSA employees step over the line?

There will never be a concise set of rules that will always get you through a checkpoint with no additional measures being tacked on. There is a lot of random stuff that you could encounter and not prevent just from following rules. All we at TSA can give you is information to transit a checkpoint. Every person and every occurance is different and ever-changing. Understand that each situation may be handled some what differently.

When will TSA correct the information for travelers that states ice is only for travelers with special needs/medical conditions while claiming it pertains to all travelers?

Something that our Office of Public Affairs needs to clear up so there is no more confusion!

I could go on but I suspect it would only be a waste of time given the responsiveness of TSA to date!

Well you can go on and on but it seems you want all information to come from Bob even if he will be repeating what he has already stated. By all means always go on and on so you get your concerns out to us.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
You regulars and trolls need a new hobby (RB)... Bob-bashers..

April 23, 2010 1:48 PM
...................
I don't call asking the government to be truthful to its owners a hobby.

Besides, I have the time.

Mack said...

Airbag technology has evolved dramatically over the last decade. The instance between impact and bag deployment has narrowed to a few milliseconds. Meanwhile, the inflation system has become far more intelligent. Deployment is today definite by a computer that monitors the force of a impinging and the position of the car's occupants. Bags are deployed with varying degrees of noesis based on the presumed risk of injury.

Automakers continue to develop better designs and more pliant positioning for the airbags throughout their respective fleets. Door-mounted, head, and curtain airbags prospect to provide even more protection for drivers and passengers in the future.

RB said...

LTSO with Answers said...
RB said...

"About this Blog

Just when will the dialogue start?


I see mostly on this blog a forum for complaining, venting and such and as a way of educating passengers. Most of you who blog seem to not like most answers given and such so a lot of the time is spent debating something instead of talking about it to make it better. Still this is good communication in my opinion. I want the public to try and understand things better but sometimes that is very difficult.

Answering some questions would go a long way towards ending the constant complaints. And I disagree that most questions have been answered.

I really doubt there are very many cases of people traveling with airbags and this is not a big issue.

Bob is simply putting out there what has been some recent activity of what is going on in our(TSA) world.

How many people has this really effected?

Why won't TSA address some real issues like:

Releasing WBI images in the same size/resolution as seen by operators? People have the right to know what the screening method they are subjected to and are being asked to accept.


I thought Bob posted this already. I saw it did you? Or do you just not believe the post?

No I did not see it! Since you seem so sure of this please post a link. I do not believe that any WBI images in the same size and resolution as seen by machine operators have ever been released to the public. Screen shots of the WBI are tiny in comparison to what is seen by the operator.

I have an absolute right to know what it is my government wants me to consent to. Seeing the actual images would give me the information to either accept WBI or not.

I also have believe that compliance with secret TSA rules are a violation of everyone's rights.

Why is TSA so anti-American that they impose secret rules on people who travel?

Ayn R. Key said...

TSO Colyn said...
For anyone seeking information on the AIT (formerly known as WBI) you may refer to other posts by bob on the TSA blog.

The questions we are asking are specifically those not answered by the other posts. Us old-timers cannot be swayed with "look for an old post, the information is there." We've been to the old post, the information is not there.

Here are the questions that are not in the other posts by Bob on this blog:

1. Given that mmw is safe and bxr is not, why does the TSA prefer bxr over mmw?

2. Why was the name changed from WBI to AIT?

3. When can we see an actual size picture of the image the screener sees?

I'm particularly interested in the first one, though the other two are very good.

Here's one more unanswered question:

What is the contact information for Bob's supervisor?

TSOWilliamReed said...

Here is the list,

Bomb components: anything electrical that is about the size of a PSP or smaller. Examples include; heart monitors, stop watches, pocket games, digital thermometers, calculators, and insulin pumps.

Batteries: Including AA AAA C D 9vlt watch batteries and Polaroid batteries.

Detonators: ANY KIND

Explosives: ANY KIND

Knifes: Any knife the size of a dinner knife can fit in your shoe, the easiest is razor blades. You could probably fill the soles of your shoes with well over 100 razor blades.

Guns: Pen guns, stun guns, cell phone guns, shoe guns, zip guns, mini revolvers, and many different gun parts

Tools: Any tool that isn't over 12" a real good one would be a dremel, you could fit one in your shoe.

Can any of these items possibly take down a plane? You bet they could! Will the passengers let half of these items take down a plane? Heck no they wouldn't, but we are trying to protect you people from having to make that decision by keeping this stuff off planes.

Please don't make me count out exactly how many items any electronic the size of a PSP or smaller would be. And yes I have personally put a PSP Inside of a shoe before, you will crack the screen from the weight but you don't need the screen to look pretty for an IED.

TSOWilliamReed said...

Ayn R. Key said...
TSO Colyn said...
For anyone seeking information on the AIT (formerly known as WBI) you may refer to other posts by bob on the TSA blog.

The questions we are asking are specifically those not answered by the other posts. Us old-timers cannot be swayed with "look for an old post, the information is there." We've been to the old post, the information is not there.

Here are the questions that are not in the other posts by Bob on this blog:

1. Given that mmw is safe and bxr is not, why does the TSA prefer bxr over mmw?

2. Why was the name changed from WBI to AIT?

3. When can we see an actual size picture of the image the screener sees?

I'm particularly interested in the first one, though the other two are very good.

Here's one more unanswered question:

What is the contact information for Bob's supervisor?

April 27, 2010 2:41 PM
-----------------

1. I don't know I would like to know as well.

2. It wasn't, WBI and Backscatter are still what they are. AIT stands for Advanced Imaging Technology and accounts for all of our new machines including WBI, Backscatter, and AIT x-rays. WBI is still WBI it is just categorized as AIT along with backscatter and AIT x-rays.

3. Bob has posted a video and two pictures of the operator in the operating room with the actual WBI screening station and screen right there. They are in the AIT and WBI blogs. Look in the comment sections if you can't find them on the blog posts themselves.

4. I think his supervisors name is Gale Rossides.....

Thanks!

Dave Nelson said...

OK, Anonymous at April 24, 2010 2:57 PM, I'll take your troll bait.

First of all, I'll get into a physics debate with you anytime.

You defined an explosion as "a material that rapidly converts from a solid to a rapidly expanding gas (sublimation). It is the pressure from this rapidly expanding gas that generates the destructive power of the explosion." Thank you, you even stated it "simply" for me.

But, you also claim that a discharge of an airbag is an explosion. Unfortunately, it violates your own simplified definition of an explosion because the gas in the cylinder never changes state. It starts out as a gas and ends up as a gas. A conventional explosion (as differentiated from a nuclear fission explosion) involves rapid combustion in which products of combustion -- heat and CO2 -- are produced.

BTW, I never stated or implied that I thought airbags were not hazardous cargo. I'm just tired of the TSA taking credit for aviation safety, which isn't even in the same area code as their function, which is subject to considerable debate.

I recommend "Physics" by Resnick & Halliday. I studied under Dr. Resnick.

idris said...

They used to contain lead azide, a low intensity explosive.

Ronnie said...

Again w/ the 'take me to your leader' stuff. There are so many leaders over our heads it isn't funny!

Ronnie
TSO DEN

Ayn R. Key said...

TSO William Reed...

1. Since you are a TSO, perhaps you can try to send the question up the chain of command, since obviously Bob won't answer it.

2. I see, the TSA has defined WBI as mmw, so therefore bxr isn't WBI, so therefore you need a new term to include both. It's a cheap game. My brother used to play that game - he gave a nonsense name to a particular method of spitting at me, so when I told mom that he was spitting at me he would deny it on the grounds that I used the wrong word for that particular form of spitting. But it was still spitting.

3. We get to see a youtube video of someone looking at the screen. How big, exactly, is the screen in the youtube video?

4. And the contact information?


Ronnie, while you have man leaders over your head, do you have one that is considered your immediate supervisor? One in particular? That's what I want from Bob.

TSM/West said...

RB asked
Here's one more unanswered question:

What is the contact information for Bob's supervisor?
TSO Reed answered
4. I think his supervisors name is Gale Rossides.....
-----------------------------------
If that doesn't work, try the United States Congress. Thats who we all answer to in the long run.

It's amazing RB. What do you think you're going to accomplish by continually asking for Bobs supervisors name? Bobs supervisor probably approves every comment he posts. He also reads this blog. If he thought Bob was doing anything wrong he would address it with Bob. He certainly wouldn't tell you if he took any corrective action or what kind of corrective action would have been given to Bob if he did anything inappropriate. Just because you don't like the answers or don't believe the answers given by Bob doesn't give you the right to hound him. You act like a teenager going to mom and pop to try to get the answer you're looking for. Whether Bob gives you the answer or his boss does the answer will be the same. And don't try to tell me he doesn't answer the questions, because he does. You just don't like the answer so you continue to look for a different one. Thats not going to happen. Before you ask my boss is the same as Bobs. If you want answers we can't provide because of SSI the talk to your elected officials.

Anonymous said...

To get the name of Bob's supervisor- Just file a Freedom of Information Request with TSA. Request the names, supervisor, and general phone number of the TSA department that runs the blog.
By law, TSA must release the information unless it meets a legal exception. It may take a few weeks, but they will release it.
http://www.tsa.gov/research/foia/index.shtm

Andew Smith said...

If this is the case, then there should have some prevention policy by the TSA.

Blogger Bob said...

Anonymous said...To get the name of Bob's supervisor- Just file a Freedom of Information Request with TSA. Request the names, supervisor, and general phone number of the TSA department that runs the blog.
By law, TSA must release the information unless it meets a legal exception. It may take a few weeks, but they will release it.
http://www.tsa.gov/research/foia/index.shtm

------------------------------

Or you can simply e-mail tsablog@dhs.gov (which my supervisor also monitors.) I'm not going to publicly post her personal contact information on this blog.

Thanks,

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

"I'm not going to publicly post her personal contact information on this blog."

It's not personal contact information, Curtis, it's public contact information. Now, post the address.

marinebattery said...

Someone please tell me why so many people pick on Bob? who is Bob's supervisor...........Oh, I think I know enough about how airbags work!

Anonymous said...

Are E-cigarettes allowed through screening?

RB said...

TSM/West said...
RB asked
Here's one more unanswered question:

What is the contact information for Bob's supervisor?
TSO Reed answered
4. I think his supervisors name is Gale Rossides.....
-----------------------------------
If that doesn't work, try the United States Congress. Thats who we all answer to in the long run.

It's amazing RB. What do you think you're going to accomplish by continually asking for Bobs supervisors name?
.............
West, I believe you have falsely attributed the asking of Bob's superior to me.

You have the wrong person so I ask you to make a clear statement retracting your comment.

Thank you.

Anonymous said...

Or you can simply e-mail tsablog@dhs.gov (which my supervisor also monitors.) I'm not going to publicly post her personal contact information on this blog.
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Bad idea Bob! Now you will be flooded with idiotic non-stop emails from all of these repetative, annoying people. Based on their complaints on this blog they really have nothing to say to your boss that your boss has any interest in hearing!

LTSO with Answers said...

Are E-cigarettes allowed through screening?

Yes, e-cigarettes are allowed through the checkpoint. TSA does not prohibit these.

TSM/West said...

RB Said

TSM/West said...
RB asked
Here's one more unanswered question:

What is the contact information for Bob's supervisor?
TSO Reed answered
4. I think his supervisors name is Gale Rossides.....
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If that doesn't work, try the United States Congress. Thats who we all answer to in the long run.

It's amazing RB. What do you think you're going to accomplish by continually asking for Bobs supervisors name?
.............
West, I believe you have falsely attributed the asking of Bob's superior to me.

You have the wrong person so I ask you to make a clear statement retracting your comment.

Thank you.
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You're absolutely right RB. I sincerely appologize. That statement keeps coming from Ann R.Key. Please except my appology.

duytan said...

so funny :D

Auto Mesa AZ said...

Air bags are extremely expensive, but worse than that, they deploy with deadly force, this could kill someone, This could be a possible security issue? Besides sounds fishy to me, you can have them shipped, stop this nonsense before someone gets hurt.

roy said...

Bob:
Please provide the name and contact information of your supervisor. You have been asked to provide this information numerous times over the past several months. You have completely ignored these requests. This is unacceptable behavior from a public servant.