Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Advanced Imaging Technology Off To a Great Start

Photo of a Knife
Since 2009, officers operating advanced imaging technology (AKA “body scanners”) have found all sorts of things on passengers. Some of these items have been smaller items such as a three inch pocket knife hidden on someone’s back, little packets of powder, a syringe full of liquid hidden in someone’s underwear, and other small items either intentionally hidden or forgotten. These finds demonstrate that imaging technology is very effective at detecting anomalies and can help TSA detect evolving threats to keep our skies safe.

Some might wonder what kind of damage small items could do to a plane since we’re looking for threats such as explosives. At first thought, you would probably think “not much,” but in addition to explosives, we’re also looking for bomb components, among other threat items. There’s more to a bomb than the explosive (timers, initiators, switches, power sources, etc.).

Photo of powder
Since our machines can detect such small items, I feel it’s important to remind passengers that when going through AIT screening, be sure to take everything out of your jacket, pants and shirt pockets. And unlike before with the walk through metal detector (magnetometer), wallets and other stuff you didn’t need to take out before will have to come out so we can get a clean image. And that goes to the folks who tuck stuff in their socks too. Making sure you get all the items out of your pockets will get you through the machine much more quickly without secondary screening and will allow the lines to move faster.

This post highlights that AIT is detecting potential threat items concealed under clothing and its deployment is helping to keep travelers safe by improving security at our airports.

As of yesterday, Charlotte Douglas International Airport is the latest airport to roll out Advanced Imaging Technology.

We’ve talked about this technology on the blog many times and you can read all of the AIT related posts here.

***Update - 4/21/2010***

We wanted to clarify that the ceramic knife in the image used for this post was discovered during the pat down of a passenger who opted out of AIT.

Thanks,
Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

151 comments:

Anonymous said...

Pocket knives are not more dangerous than other knives, metal scraps and any other sharp object easily obtainable within the secure area. If you can´t hold up more than one person at a time with a weapon, it is not a threat to an airplane.

The amount of powder shown and a liquid filled syringe can pass through security easily by not being on the persons body surface. A bag that big would go unnoticed in a carry on or could be placed in body cavities, in the mouth or between skin folds. The only reason a person would put it on their body is because they are junkies hiding their stash. That does not make them a threat to an airplane.

Whole body scanners do not detect explosives.

Oh yes, and please explain what you did with all the images of maxi pads you saw. Ignoring them leaves a huge loophole in security, doesn´t it? Did you inspect all menstruating women??

Anonymous said...

How can we ensure that our wallets are safe while being virtually strip-searched?

Anonymous said...

Blogger Bob said:

"There’s more to a bomb than the explosive (timers, initiators, switches, power sources, etc.)."

And all the items listed above can also be part of everyday objects currently passing through checkpoints everyday.

Do you really believe anyone trying to smuggle the parts you listed couldn't get them through a checkpoint in their carry-on bag?

Anonymous said...

Bob,

I noticed that the article doesn't actually mention the knife that is shown. A metal detector or X-ray would have easily found the knife.

Are you trying to be a bit deceitful by showing the knife?

Ayn R. Key said...

And the reason the TSA prefers bxr to mmw is ...?

Once that is settled, then we can move on to the issue of how much of what you found is actually a danger to a flight, but you are putting us in harms way when you use bxr when completely safe mmw is available.

Anonymous said...

Bob, does the fact that TSA is finding these items indicate that people only started carrying them when virtual strip-searches started, or that people carried them for years before virtual strip-searches with no ill effects on any flight?

How many harmless items, like private medical devices, have these items detected?

How are alarms that are the result of a harmless medical item like a prosthetic breast or adult diaper resolved?

Is TSA tracking the number of harmless items that alarm the virtual strip-search devices?

What steps is TSA taking to secure the belongings of individuals it virtually strip-searches?

What steps is TSA taking to ensure every passenger knows they are not required to be virtually strip-searched?

How many countries force every air passenger to remove their shoes for screening?

Anonymous said...

"Anonymous said... Pocket knives are not more dangerous than other knives."

Most officers and HQ peeps would agree with you.

This is one that the critters on the hill have to fix. TSA can't just decide they are okay.

Anonymous said...

Bob, is the knife shown in the image with this post one that was detected by a virtual strip search device?

Blogger Bob said...

Anonymous said... Bob, I noticed that the article doesn't actually mention the knife that is shown. A metal detector or X-ray would have easily found the knife. Are you trying to be a bit deceitful by showing the knife? April 20, 2010 2:33 PM

------------------------

Hi Anon. It's a plastic knife. Not a toy, but an actual durable pointy plastic knife that can do some major damage. Why is it plastic you might ask? It's made for folks who need/want to get a knife past a metal detector.

Thanks,

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

Bob, why does this post open with a picture of a large knife when the only knife you can claim to have found is a three-inch pocketknife that can harm no one?

Anonymous said...

"Why is it plastic you might ask? It's made for folks who need/want to get a knife past a metal detector."

Bob, are you claiming that this knife was found by a virtual strip search? If so, why no mention in the post? If not, why post the photo?

Anonymous said...

Blogger Bob said:

"It's a plastic knife. Not a toy, but an actual durable pointy plastic knife that can do some major damage. Why is it plastic you might ask? It's made for folks who need/want to get a knife past a metal detector. "

Can it do more damage that scissors or knitting needles that are allowed through?

Anonymous said...

Bob, how are virtual strip search alarms resolved?

Anonymous said...

"It's made for folks who need/want to get a knife past a metal detector."

YES OR NO, BOB: Was this knife discovered by a virtual strip search?

Anonymous said...

Bob,

Can you show us the results of false positive alarms with these machines, and how they are handled? Unless you can prove that false positives are rare and can be resolved quickly and unobtrusively, I can´t accept a "layer of security" that is ethically questionable and seems to bring little help in terms of real safety (as commented by all the persons above).

Anonymous said...

Because applesauce and cottage cheese for a 93-year-old elderly woman leads to TERRORISM! Big brother must CRUSH the applesauce revolution!

http://cbs2.com/local/Woman.Accused.Of.2.1643774.html

winstonsmith said...

So let's see. You are telling us that you found several small items, none of which were an actual threat to the aircraft, while showing a picture of something you didn't find. To me, this is nothing more than an unconstitutional dragnet. I know that I will never personally submit to being strip-searched simply to board a flight. I am hoping to get some congressional representation in November who will support my bid to disband the TSA in its entirety, to return airport security to what it was pre 9/11, and to put the resources we are wasting on this agency into programs that might actually make a difference, such as FBI infiltration of terrorist groups, etc.

Anonymous said...

WHAT PROVISIONS ARE BEING TAKEN FOR WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER PROSTETICS? WILL THEY BE ASKED TO REMOVE?
ANONYMOUS LB

Anonymous said...

Oh, yeah, this post really proves why these machines are worth over half a billion dollars. Nice job, TSA.

Cerulean Bill said...

Interesting. I like that it can pick up things like that - I've wondered about bomb-makers 'miniaturizing' their stuff. Not too thrilled about having to take every last thing out. Gah. I guess there's NO way to make this painless, is there?

RB said...

How many children have been virtually STRIP SEARCHED by TSA employees?

Anonymous said...

Bob, since the TSA is now requiring that I give up my wallet before going into the nude-o-scope machine, what hope have I of protecting it? Given how many thefts occur at checkpoints, isn't that more or less allowing anyone to steal the property of others? I can't imagine that a TSO would think good things if I were to try to move, make noise, or leave the nude-o-scope machine if I saw someone trying to leave with my property.

Sandra said...

Winstonsmith wrote:

"So let's see. You are telling us that you found several small items, none of which were an actual threat to the aircraft,..."

Thank you, winstonsmith, for making that important observation.

Bob, until you can come back to us and tell us that you found an item that can bring down an aircraft, please stop with your crowing, because it just make you and TSA look like fools.

Anonymous said...

Sigh..........still waiting for an answer to this question.

Do AIT scanners show any detail of a woman's labia, breasts or a man's penis?

Anonymous said...

The post states:

Some of these items have been smaller items such as a three inch pocket knife hidden on someone’s back, little packets of powder, a syringe full of liquid hidden in someone’s underwear, and other small items either intentionally hidden or forgotten.

Questions:

1)The knife in the post is 9 inches but the pocket knife concealed on someones back is a 3 inch pocket knife. Was the 9 inch plastic knife found by a strip search scanner?

2)Was the packet of powder found chemicals to an explosive or something non-life threatening? Was it intentionally hidden or forgotten?

3)Was the liquid in the syringe found a deadly chemical or liquid detonator? Or was it a legitimate drug for an existing medical condition?

Anonymous said...

Come on, I've got to leave my wallet unattended now? I don't trust fellow passengers or the TSA agents to not steal it. The entire process is becoming a bigger pain and isn't making us one bit safer. Come on guys, spend the time and energy catching bad guys BEFORE they get to the airport.

AngryMiller said...

About the thieves working for TSA, how will you be able to keep them from making off with your wallet while you've surrendered it for a thorough going through?

Anonymous said...

Quote from your post:
This post highlights that AIT is detecting potential threat items concealed under clothing and its deployment is helping to keep travelers safe by improving security at our airports.

My that is one heck of a sentence.
Where are the potentional "threat items" that were found?
How am I safer at the airport by the use of these machines? You mean to tell me that at airports that do not have AIT, that I am not safe?
Improving security? So before AIT, the TSA now admits that we were less safe? And once again, what about airports without AIT? We are less safe there?
The government is bent on forcing this technology down our throats if we want it or not. It will not make anything safer, in fact it may make us less safe.
What happens next when someone does get something through the AIT? Once it is compromised, it becomes obsolete. Just as the WTMD is becoming, as it cannot detect all threats.
There are many "holes" in the security system. Trying to close one (hiding objects on a persons body that allows detection) with a system full of flaws,is pointless, unless all "holes" are closed.

Anonymous said...

I can't read these blogs anymore. The sheer ignorance of some of these idiots is sickening. No wonder this country is so messed up.

RB said...

How TSA protects the flying public:

http://cbs2.com/local/Woman.Accused.Of.2.1643774.html

A judge Tuesday threw out a case against Nadine Hays, who is accused of hitting a TSA agent who allegedly tried to take away her elderly mother's applesauce-


The Transportation Security Administration declined to comment, but said they did review all allegations internally in hopes that agents will learn from them.
......................
Why is it that TSA refuses to meet the public when its employees abuse citizens?

Why were these employees not fired for their actions.

More well trained employees as claimed by Bob!

HappyToHelp said...

Anonymous said...
“How can we ensure that our wallets are safe while being virtually strip-searched”
Before going through Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT), you can place your valuables inside your bag or at least make sure they are not visible such as leaving it under a jacket. This trick is very common, and is recommended by traveler sites even before TSA used AIT machines.

Tim
TSA Blog Team

Gunner said...

Wow, someone in Miami actually tried to sneak a ruler through security.

Great catch, boys and girls, great catch. The Republic is much safer as a result of your efforts.

Ban all rulers!

An Catholic schoolchild can tell you that in the hands of a 92-lb Nun, rulers are definitely instruments of terror!

Isaac Newton said...

Bob, your frequent mention of "bags of powder" and syringes suggest that this is really just a dragnet for drugs. As others have stated, there are other ways to get such things through security without detection, yet no evidence of such items being successfully used in an attack on an aircraft.

Also, you really need to address the question of how screeners will resolve false alarms on adult diapers, sanitary pads, and other medical items. You keep writing about how good this technology is, but have failed to answer this simple question.

Anonymous said...

What measures is TSA taking to ensure that now with the advent of this new screening that REQUIRES the person to remove their wallet that this item will not be a) stolen or b) searched by over eager TSOs (contrary to policy).

Anonymous said...

The head of a sex crimes unit is busted for what? SEX CRIMES All sex crimes special unit officers are pervs.

(sarcasm)

Anonymous said...

Here is an idea to protect your wallets and other valuable items. Put them inside your carry-on after you have completed the ID checks. This way they are not just sitting out, they are inside the bag. TSA should not be allowed to go inside your bag until you are standing there, watching them. Just an idea and hope it helps the concerned.

Anonymous said...

TSA does not care that their policies leave our luggage vulnerable to theft and the insertion of bombs.

TSA will not care about our wallets being stolen.

RB said...

HappyToHelp said...
Anonymous said...
“How can we ensure that our wallets are safe while being virtually strip-searched”
Before going through Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT), you can place your valuables inside your bag or at least make sure they are not visible such as leaving it under a jacket. This trick is very common, and is recommended by traveler sites even before TSA used AIT machines.

Tim
TSA Blog Team

April 21, 2010 12:09 AM
..............
Letting my wallet out of my direct control is a problem.

Could a person just hold their wallet in hand if they choose to be screened by the STrip Search Porno Machine?

Anonymous said...

"Before going through Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT), you can place your valuables inside your bag or at least make sure they are not visible such as leaving it under a jacket."

How far are the strip-search machines located from the bags passengers must abandon in order to be strip-searched?

How is this an improvement over WTMDs, which let people leave their wallets in their pockets, where they belong?

Anonymous said...

H2H -- That's all well and good, but that doesn't make it any less likely things will be stolen. What's to stop someone from walking off with a bag or a jacket? Come on now.

Anonymous said...

Why is it so hard for TSA blog staff to answer simple yes/no questions? Was the knife pictured in the post found by the nude-o-scope (or whatever the heck you're calling it these days) or was it not? Answer the question.

Anonymous said...

Um, I can just take a knife from the table at one of the nice restaurants in the "sterile zone". Why would I have to smuggle one through security?

Anonymous said...

"Don't put valuables in suitcases".
"Put wallets in carry-ons"
"Carry your ID at all times."
"Keep posession of your passport/boarding pass at all times"
"Empty your pockets..."

Hrmm.. Catch-22 much, TSA?

The goal of terrorism is to force your opponents to change. Congratulations! We Lost!

Blogger Bob said...

***Update - 4/21/2010***

We wanted to clarify that the ceramic knife in the image used for this post was discovered during the pat down of a passenger who opted out of AIT.

(The knife is ceramic, not plastic as I had stated earlier)

Thanks,

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

Regarding your update:

What ceramic knife in which photo?

No ceramic knifes are shown.

Anonymous said...

Bob, why did you choose to include a photo of a knife that was not detected by a strip-search? What's the name and contact information for your direct supervisor?

Anonymous said...

The knife in your picture is the Silent Agent ABS Dagger by Grey Eagle.

ABS is plastic, not ceramic.

And just what does the photo have to do with the article and AIT anyway?

Anonymous said...

Blogger Bob said...
***Update - 4/21/2010***

We wanted to clarify that the ceramic knife in the image used for this post was discovered during the pat down of a passenger who opted out of AIT.

(The knife is ceramic, not plastic as I had stated earlier)

Thanks,

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team
--------------------------------

Thank you for your prompt response. Now I have another question: Knowing that this knife was not detected by the nude-o-scope, what reason could you possibly have for prominently displaying it in a post touting the nude-o-scope's ability to find such items? Is it really worth over half a billion dollars (in this year alone!) to find 3" pocket knives, syringes, and powdered narcotics, none of which poses a threat to air travel? If this device is really needed in order to detect small, concealable, non-metallic bomb components, why don't you show us some images of the small, concealable, non-metallic bomb components that you have found?

Until you do so, I will assume that your screeners have not actually intercepted any such items. Perhaps the reason is because attempted terrorist attacks on commercial aviation are extraordinarily rare. Is there anyone who seriously believes that A) competent terrorists are being caught by the TSA and B) the TSA is not rushing to publicize this information?

(Incidentally, to all those who say that we have to invest such a ludicrous amount of money in airline security because the economic impact of even one attack would be so economically disastrous, I have one question: why is no one discussing pouring several billion dollars into systems that will prevent the eruption of volcanoes? After all, this would appear to be as feasible (or infeasible) a proposition as your apparent belief that we can prevent a successful attack on commercial aviation.)

Anonymous said...

"Could a person just hold their wallet in hand if they choose to be screened by the STrip Search Porno Machine?"

Seems very reasonable. How about it?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Bob, why did you choose to include a photo of a knife that was not detected by a strip-search? What's the name and contact information for your direct supervisor?
----------------------------------
I will second that request. Bob, why is it so hard for you to do what any customer relations professional in any business would be expected to do and provide us with the information we need to register a complaint about your deceptive posts and your egregiously unprofessional tone? People have been requesting this information for months.

Anonymous said...

I noticed that the article doesn't actually mention the knife that is shown. A metal detector or X-ray would have easily found the knife.
__________________________________

Sorry Ceramic items do not set off a metal detector. Ceramic is not metal.

Anonymous said...

YES OR NO, BOB: Was this knife discovered by a virtual strip search?
__________________________________
Why don't you people read the entire post before asking these obnoxious quesions!!! It says at the very end of the post how the knife in the picture was found!!!!!

RB said...

http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/04/21/scanners.opposition/index.html?iref=allsearch


"Groups ask DHS to suspend full-body imagers"

Maybe things are not so well in the TSA world of STRIP SEARCH PORNO MACHINES!

Response TSA?

Anonymous said...

"Knowing that this knife was not detected by the nude-o-scope, what reason could you possibly have for prominently displaying it in a post touting the nude-o-scope's ability to find such items?"

For the same reason they are rushing to install several hundred machines out to airports for an "optional" procedure - behaviour management. They are hoping that any viewer seeing the knife will associate it with the machines (and believe they are safer because of them), just like they hope by having the machines at every airport, they can eventually make them mandatory (you know, "Well, we have them everywhere and spent a lot of money on them, so might as well make sure they are used").

It's pretty basic stuff they are doing. The only surprise to me is they are doing it so crudely. One of the approaches appears to be the latest popular approach to managing change: ignore the folks who will resist it, because they won't be able to affect the change and will eventually come around (yes, studies have shown this to be true). What can you do? Elect people who *can* make change and are willing to do so - and hold them accountable to it. Contrary to popular belief, government agencies can and do go away from time to time; but they rarely go away by themselves.

Anonymous said...

"what reason could you possibly have for prominently displaying [a knife]in a post touting the nude-o-scope's ability to find such items"

Yo use fear to mainpulate us.

Anonymous said...

Blogger Bob wrote:

Since our machines can detect such small items, I feel it’s important to remind passengers that when going through AIT screening, be sure to take everything out of your jacket, pants and shirt pockets. And unlike before with the walk through metal detector (magnetometer), wallets and other stuff you didn’t need to take out before will have to come out so we can get a clean image. And that goes to the folks who tuck stuff in their socks too. Making sure you get all the items out of your pockets will get you through the machine much more quickly without secondary screening and will allow the lines to move faster.


Isn't it ironic that when they introduce new fancy expensive technologies, they claim the technology will make things easier for passengers, but when the technologies are actually implemented, the demands placed on passengers are even more excessive.

Without the virtual strip search, there was no problem leaving your wallet on your person, or having a money belt under your shirt, or having an attached/implanted medical device, or any number of other personal items that are not WEI and that an individual might wish to keep private.

Now, with the virtual strip search, TSA demands that you empty everything, up to and including your SOCKS.?.? And there are anecdotal reports of breast-cancer survivors being loudly harassed in full public view about their prosthetic.

They did this with the puffers too--you were supposed to be able to leave your coat and shoes on since the puffer would detect exposives and the WTMD would detect weapons, but TSA still insisted on x-raying shoes.

And they've done this with the new x-ray machines for carry-on, which were supposed to abolish the absurd war-on-water. But will still have to put up with 3.4-1-1 insanity.

DHS/TSA is completely out of control. The scope and magnitude of their power trip is astonishing.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Bob, why did you choose to include a photo of a knife that was not detected by a strip-search? What's the name and contact information for your direct supervisor?

April 21, 2010 12:48 PM
........
You expect honesty and integrity from TSA?

Now that really makes me laugh!

Anonymous said...

Great Job TSA. Keep up he good work! I for one enjoy the friendly faces at the airport and people that can actually speak the English language. Yes not everyone is happy with new rules and proceedures. If it will stop an inflight incident it is worth all of the hassel.

8675309 said...

"How many countries force every passenger to remove their shoes for screening?"

I flew out of Mexico last week and 100% of passengers were required to remove their shoes before they could board the aircraft.

So far I've flown out of 2 different countries and had to remove my shoes at 100% of them. So in my experience, the answer to your question is "100%".

Anonymous said...

Bob, why did you choose to include a photo of a knife that was not detected by a strip-search? What's the name and contact information for your direct supervisor?
__________________________________
I'm serious, you people need to find better things to worry about and to do with your time! I don't even know what else to say. And you wonder why there is never a follow up on your complaints. Really! Because Bob's boss does not have time to deal with annoying, childish complaints!

Anonymous said...

"Why don't you people read the entire post before asking these obnoxious quesions!!! It says at the very end of the post how the knife in the picture was found!!!!!"

It says that in an update that was only posted after multiple comments pointed out Bob's attempt to mislead. Those "obnoxious questions" forced a rare moment of near-honesty.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

Why don't you people read the entire post before asking these obnoxious quesions!!! It says at the very end of the post how the knife in the picture was found!!!!!

----

Why don't you read the comments and the post before realizing that the question was asked on 4/20, and the explanation was added as an update on 4/21?

This begs the question, Bob: Since the knife was not found via WBI/AIT/etc., why is it being used to headline a post touting the benefits of the system? Seems very misleading to me.

grosir baju wanita said...

I noticed that the article doesn't actually mention the knife that is shown. succesfull..

Anonymous said...

For those of you wanting to know the name of Bob's supervisor, you can find it in the thread entitled "TSA gets serious about social media" at FlyerTalk in the Travel Safety/Security forum.

Will this post see the light of day here, Bob, or are you going to censor it?

RB said...

Bob, you first claim that the knife pictured is plastic, then later claim it is ceramic. So which is it Bob?

Regardless the item was not found by WBI PORNO STRIP SEARCH MACHINES.

Shouldn't the picture be deleted from this thread since it is not only misleading but also off topic to the discussion?

Patrick (BOS TSO) said...

RB said...
Letting my wallet out of my direct control is a problem.

Could a person just hold their wallet in hand if they choose to be screened by Advanced Imaging Technology?


You're allowed to hold your valuable items as an option over your head when you step through the machine.

Watches and wallets are given a quick visual check IN FRONT OF YOU to make sure they're not tampered with.

Blogger Bob said...

I'm cutting and pasting from a question I answered last year.

Do I have to divest my wallet prior to being screened by AIT?

Your wallet must be divested prior to AIT screening so we can screen its contents via the X-ray.

We also need to be able to determine you have nothing on your person while being screened in the AIT.

If you choose to keep your wallet on your person, you will be referred for additional screening and your wallet will receive a physical inspection. The additional screening is not a threat or a punishment for not divesting, it's just security protocol.

It's always a good idea to place your wallet in one of your bags or a coat pocket. It reduces the chances of it being separated from your belongings. Also, you can request to have your property stay in your view.

Anonymous said...

How many harmless items, like private medical devices, have these items detected?

How are alarms that are the result of a harmless medical item like a prosthetic breast or adult diaper resolved?

Is TSA tracking the number of harmless items that alarm the virtual strip-search devices?

Anonymous said...

What steps is TSA taking to secure the belongings of individuals it virtually strip-searches?

RB said...

Blogger Bob said...
I'm cutting and pasting from a question I answered last year.

Do I have to divest my wallet prior to being screened by AIT?

Your wallet must be divested prior to AIT screening so we can screen its contents via the X-ray.

We also need to be able to determine you have nothing on your person while being screened in the AIT.

If you choose to keep your wallet on your person, you will be referred for additional screening and your wallet will receive a physical inspection. The additional screening is not a threat or a punishment for not divesting, it's just security protocol.

It's always a good idea to place your wallet in one of your bags or a coat pocket. It reduces the chances of it being separated from your belongings. Also, you can request to have your property stay in your view.

April 22, 2010 3:37 PM
............
If going through a WTMD there is no requirement to surrender ones wallet.

Why the difference with STRIP SEARCH SCREENING?

Given that I have to place my wallet in control of potential TSA criminals if I chose WBI screening seals the deal to refuse that form of screening.

omars said...

Why do I have to request my property stay in my view? That seems like such common-sense it should be policy, unless policy continues to be to have TSA employees pilfer and steal (which makes the grade for national news often enough to be fairly common in reality).

Also, what threat to aircraft do junkies' personal stashes pose? TSA employees are not law enforcement and have no authority from congress to act as such.

Anonymous said...

What about that TSA employee or FAM or whatever they are called who was arrested for rape in Seattle allegedly committed while wearing his badge and sidearm?
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2011663160_airmarshal22m.html

Who is the real danger to the public?

Anonymous said...

"Why do I have to request my property stay in my view? That seems like such common-sense..."

Why does our luggage have to be vulnerable to theft and planting of bombs?

Anonymous said...

8675309 said...
"How many countries force every passenger to remove their shoes for screening?"

I flew out of Mexico last week and 100% of passengers were required to remove their shoes before they could board the aircraft.

So far I've flown out of 2 different countries and had to remove my shoes at 100% of them. So in my experience, the answer to your question is "100%".

April 21, 2010 3:58 PM
..............
Headed to the Us were you?

TSA requires other countries to comply with TSA requirements when going to the US. Fly domestically or to any other country and the procedure changes.

Anonymous said...

Bob,

That can't be a cut and paste. You only started calling whole body scans AIT recently, when you found out it sounded less likely to remind people that it is a virtual strip search.

Anonymous said...

RB said..

If going through a WTMD there is no requirement to surrender ones wallet.

Why the difference with STRIP SEARCH SCREENING?
-------------------------------------

I think because it gives the operator a clearer image of the body. The wallet might be blocking something that is hidden on the body.

The AIT is like a full body pat-down made easy. And, you do have to take out your wallet when you get a full body pat-down. It has to go through the x-ray even if it does not have any metal in it.

So, the taking out the wallet isn't just unique to the AIT.

Anonymous said...

If we the TSA wants to to be more like the Israelis then why are they rolling out AIT technology that Israeli security specialists know is ineffective?


http://www.canada.com/news/airport+security+scanners+waste+money+Israeli+security+specialist/2939730/story.html

Anonymous said...

Bob, I heard over and over for 2 years that the strip search machines had absolutely no capability to store or send images.
Now a privacy advocacy group (through a freedom of information request) has discovered the machines DO have the capability of storing and sending images.
Did the TSA spread a lie to the taxpayers for 2 years about these machines?
DO NOT tell me "oh yea, but that is just for training." NO capability means exactly that!
A simple yes, or no will suffice; did the TSA implement a successful 2 year campaign to deceive the American public?

HappyToHelp said...

Anonymous said...
“H2H -- That's all well and good, but that doesn't make it any less likely things will be stolen. What's to stop someone from walking off with a bag or a jacket? Come on now.”

Here are some tips from eHow. You can also read how to protect your stuff in midair.

In my previous post, I am just recommending what I do when I travel. Your welcome to fellow these tips if you would prefer.

Tim
TSA Blog Team

MarkVII said...

My standard practice was to put my wallet in my carry on when I divest, but keep my cash, photo ID, credit card, and boarding pass on my person. That way, I don't alarm the WTMD and if my carry on goes astray at security, I've still got the basics I need to continue my journey.

However, if I'm required to put my money, ID, etc. in my carry on while being put through the WBI/AIT/whatever and my carry on goes astray, I've got nothing.

I can't prove my identity to the TSA, though they demand that a citizen produce their "papers" on demand. Also, I can't prove my identity to LEO's, who are programmed to regard a person without ID as "suspicious". Highly ironic, to say the least.

Why doesn't the TSA have some containers available at these scanners, so a citizen can put critical items there while being scanned? All the TSA needs is a few plastic bowls from the dollar store.

Mark
qui custodiet ipsos custodes

AngryMiller said...

Bob, at several airports, I've had TSOs start to walk off with my bags for additional inspection before all of my belongings are in one place. Sometimes get the eye roll when I ask them to wait.

Is this professional behavior? I realize that TSA has little regard for the safety/security of my belongings as demonstrated at the checkpoints by TSA employees.

I suspect that the wallet thing might lead to an already edgy passenger going off on one of your over zealous employees - with disastrous results for both the TSO and the passenger. Securing a passenger's belongings should be just as important as making sure they don't have any WEI on them.

Happy passengers make for a good checkpoint experience. Enraged passengers - not so much.

Anonymous said...

Patrick (BOS TSO) said...

You're allowed to hold your valuable items as an option over your head when you step through the machine.

______________________________

Anybody want to start tracking how often this extremely sensible suggestion is actually allowed by TSOs in multiple airports in real life?

My guess -- the chances of consistent policy rollout by the TSA is slim to none.

RB said...

I think because it gives the operator a clearer image of the body. The wallet might be blocking something that is hidden on the body.

The AIT is like a full body pat-down made easy. And, you do have to take out your wallet when you get a full body pat-down. It has to go through the x-ray even if it does not have any metal in it.

So, the taking out the wallet isn't just unique to the AIT.

April 22, 2010 8:20 PM

...............
Funny, I received a pat down at DFW Terminal A a couple of months ago and did not have to remove my wallet.

More well trained TSA employees or someone talking without knowing?

Besides if the person held the wallet in hand during the screening it would then be equal to the WTMD.

Having to surrender ones wallet to comply with WBI "Strip Search" screening is punitive.

TSOWilliamReed said...

RB said...
Bob, you first claim that the knife pictured is plastic, then later claim it is ceramic. So which is it Bob?

Regardless the item was not found by WBI PORNO STRIP SEARCH MACHINES.

Shouldn't the picture be deleted from this thread since it is not only misleading but also off topic to the discussion?

April 22, 2010 9:51 AM
----------------

It was found because of the WBI scanner. If the passenger would have walked through the scanner it would have been found. He decided not to go through it and recieved a pat down instead therefore still finding the knife. If he went through a WTMD he would not have alarmed and would not have recieve a pat down resulting in the knife going through. Therefore the WBI scanner is responsible for finding the knife.

Anonymous said...

TSOWillianReed said:

It was found because of the WBI scanner. If the passenger would have walked through the scanner it would have been found. He decided not to go through it and recieved a pat down instead therefore still finding the knife. If he went through a WTMD he would not have alarmed and would not have recieve a pat down resulting in the knife going through. Therefore the WBI scanner is responsible for finding the knife.

No.

The TSO who discovered the knife is responsible for having discovered it. This knife never appeared on the WBI/AIT/Nude-e-scope screen.

Faulty reasoning.

RB said...

TSOWilliamReed said...
RB said...
Bob, you first claim that the knife pictured is plastic, then later claim it is ceramic. So which is it Bob?

Regardless the item was not found by WBI PORNO STRIP SEARCH MACHINES.

Shouldn't the picture be deleted from this thread since it is not only misleading but also off topic to the discussion?

April 22, 2010 9:51 AM
----------------

It was found because of the WBI scanner. If the passenger would have walked through the scanner it would have been found. He decided not to go through it and recieved a pat down instead therefore still finding the knife. If he went through a WTMD he would not have alarmed and would not have recieve a pat down resulting in the knife going through. Therefore the WBI scanner is responsible for finding the knife.

April 23, 2010 12:05 PM
....................
Aren't people subject to pat down even if they do not alarm the WTMD?

And why wouldn't a BDO pick up on a person hiding a hand weapon while being screened?

GSOLTSO said...

Isaac Newton sez - "Bob, your frequent mention of "bags of powder" and syringes suggest that this is really just a dragnet for drugs. As others have stated, there are other ways to get such things through security without detection, yet no evidence of such items being successfully used in an attack on an aircraft."

Please refresh my memory on what types of items AbdulMutallab tried to use and bring down an airliner? Looking at powders and needles or syringes that are concealed (intentionally or not) on the person is a direct result of something being attempted. The fact that this attempt was not successful was due to luck on our part and poor manufacture or method on AbdulMutallabs part. This is a known method now, and these machines can help to find things of this nature better than the WTMD or pat downs. It is simply using technology that is available to screen for a known method.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

http://news.globaltv.com/world/airport+security+scanners+waste+money+Israeli+security+specialist/2939730/story.html


Read it on Global News: New airport security scanners a waste of money: Israeli security specialist


Boasting he could easily slip through one of Canada's new full-body scanners with enough explosives to blow up a jumbo jet, a leading Israeli airport security expert says the federal government has wasted millions of dollars to install "useless" imaging machines at airports across the country.

Read it on Global News: New airport security scanners a waste of money: Israeli security specialist

MarkVII said...

The WBI machine's role in finding this knife is indirect at best. Giving it credit because the passenger opted for pat down instead sounds like overreaching to me.

avxo said...

TSOWillianReed wrote: "It was found because of the WBI scanner. If the passenger would have walked through the scanner it would have been found."

No. It might have been found. There's a difference between might have and would have. Words have meaning.

You speak as if the technology is infallible, when it demonstrably isn't. Items can still be sneaked through as can be seen in this video: http://www.americablog.com/2010/01/german-tv-highlights-failings-of-body.html

That's not to say that the scanners aren't an improvement over the old metal detectors -- they are. But they are not a panacea, and you (and others from TSA) should stop talking about them as if they are.

Of course, it's possible (albeit not probable) that you simply didn't know and were just repeating what a supervisor, trainer or colleague told you. I half-wish that isn't the case, because if it is, that says something about the TSA.

Anonymous said...

"It was found because of the WBI scanner. If the passenger would have walked through the scanner it would have been found. He decided not to go through it and recieved a pat down instead therefore still finding the knife. If he went through a WTMD he would not have alarmed and would not have recieve a pat down resulting in the knife going through. Therefore the WBI scanner is responsible for finding the knife."

Why should we believe you? Every single thing TSA has told us about these machines has turned out to be a lie so far. Odds are you're just trying to spin the fact that we caught Bob using this deceptive image in the first place.

Bob, what's the name and contact information of your direct supervisor?

TSA, why do you think we should be subject to sexual battery before flying?

Anonymous said...

"Is this professional behavior?"

Of course not, but TSA is not a professional organization, nor is it concerned with anyone's security.

Anonymous said...

How many harmless items, like private medical devices, have these items detected?

How are alarms that are the result of a harmless medical item like a prosthetic breast or adult diaper resolved?

Is TSA tracking the number of harmless items that alarm the virtual strip-search devices?

Anonymous said...

"I can't read these blogs anymore. The sheer ignorance of some of these idiots is sickening. No wonder this country is so messed up."

That's true, the sheer ignorance of TSA and its employees IS sickening. No wonder air travel is so messed up.

Anonymous said...

"Watches and wallets are given a quick visual check IN FRONT OF YOU to make sure they're not tampered with."

No TSO will ever even SEE my wallet until a uniformed LEO is present to prevent the TSO from stealing from me.

RB said...

Sorry, Uncle Sam, I Refuse to Be Ionized By W. Gifford-Jones, M.D.

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/content/view/28541/


"X-rays that use ionizing radiation can trigger sufficient energy to displace electrons from an atom. Experts say this has the potential to cause mutations in cells that can lead to malignancy. But no one can be sure how much exposure is needed to cause this change."

"Other radiation experts are concerned that there has never been a study about the additive effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. This means a roll of the dice, particularly if you are a frequent flyer."

"My advice for all travelers is to tell Uncle Sam they want a pat down as authorities claim this choice will be available. Besides, as one of my 70-year-old patients said, “At my age, if anyone wants to pat me down, he can be my guest!”"

JUST SAY NO TO TSA WBI STRIP SEARCHES!

IT MAY JUST KILL YOU.

Anonymous said...

This is a reply from a different post regarding AIT:

Blogger GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Still waiting for an answer on this question:

Do the TSA AIT scanners show nipples or any detail of a female passenger's labia or a man's penis??"

There is some representation of the areas mentioned, but detail is a very vague question. You can see the images on this very blog on earlier posts and there are even some videos out there that can show some of the "detail" you can see with the AIT. More specifically, what level of detail are you asking about? The resolution does not go down to the hair follicle level, but there is an accurate representation of the body as it is.

West
TSA Blog Team

April 19, 2010 3:49 PM
---------------------------------

"The resolution does not go down to the hair follicle level"

how could the resolution go down to the hair follicle level if AIT does not show any hair?????

Why is the detail a vague question? Either you recognize genitals or you can't.

Does the TSA have any current plans to let the passenger view their own image exactly as the screener sees?

Yunus VRl said...

How can we ensure that our wallets are safe while being virtually strip-searched?

Anonymous said...

I was on an AA flight yesterday. I had duct tape in my back pack. I've seen duct tape used to tape dynamite sticks together around a bomber's torso. So, duct tape is "bomb making equipment". But I was allowed on with the duct tape. But the plane did not go boom! Just like the plane probably wouldn't have gone boom if powder made it on either.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I was on an AA flight yesterday. I had duct tape in my back pack. I've seen duct tape used to tape dynamite sticks together around a bomber's torso. So, duct tape is "bomb making equipment". But I was allowed on with the duct tape. But the plane did not go boom! Just like the plane probably wouldn't have gone boom if powder made it on either.
-----------------------------------

TATP looks like powder. If that powder in the pic was found on the individual, the TSA must investigate.

Anonymous said...

RB said...

Funny, I received a pat down at DFW Terminal A a couple of months ago and did not have to remove my wallet.

More well trained TSA employees or someone talking without knowing?
-----------------------------------

Do you know that there is more than one type of pat down? I only mentioned the pat down in which it is required for a passenger to remove their wallet.

If you try to be "smart" with me, you need to make sure you know everything on the matter. And, it seems you don't on this matter.

RB said...

Yunus VRl said...
How can we ensure that our wallets are safe while being virtually strip-searched?

April 25, 2010 5:04 AM
...............
If you let TSA near your wallet while you are being screened then the only thing you can be sure of is your wallet is not safe.

Anonymous said...

Sentry spewed:

I bet these scanners will help cut down on the people who smuggle drugs through airports. In the past, if you didn't have any metal on you, you were free to smuggle whatever you wanted.

With these scanners, I bet people will think twice about transporting illegal substances. Just an added benefit to enhanced traveling security

April 25, 2010 2:07 AM

******************************

Hmmm, how about the drug mules that smuggle the drugs inside of swallowed condoms? I don't see how this is going to do anything about that senario.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - ""The resolution does not go down to the hair follicle level"

how could the resolution go down to the hair follicle level if AIT does not show any hair?????

Why is the detail a vague question? Either you recognize genitals or you can't.

Does the TSA have any current plans to let the passenger view their own image exactly as the screener sees?"

It is a vague question, in many cases you can recognize genitals, the images on this site have shown that, but there are varying levels of detail.

At this time, TSA has no plans to allow (based on my reading and info) passengers to see their own images, or anyone elses images (with the exception of stock footage from the manufacturer).

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

Anonymous said...
RB said...

Funny, I received a pat down at DFW Terminal A a couple of months ago and did not have to remove my wallet.

More well trained TSA employees or someone talking without knowing?
-----------------------------------

Do you know that there is more than one type of pat down? I only mentioned the pat down in which it is required for a passenger to remove their wallet.

If you try to be "smart" with me, you need to make sure you know everything on the matter. And, it seems you don't on this matter.

April 26, 2010 7:54 PM
......................
Anon said..........

The AIT is like a full body pat-down made easy. And, you do have to take out your wallet when you get a full body pat-down. It has to go through the x-ray even if it does not have any metal in it.

So, the taking out the wallet isn't just unique to the AIT.

April 22, 2010 8:20 PM
...............
So Anon you say in once post that a person must remove wallet for a full body pat down the in another you accuse me of "getting smart with you" and claim that removing ones wallet is not required in every instance.

And just how would I be able to know that there are more than one type of pat down when TSA operates with secret rules much like the Stazi of old East Germany?

So just how am I getting "smart" with you Anon, when all did was to I respond directly to your post?

Also is "getting smart with me" some kind of threat?

Are you a TSA employee by chance?

I'm thinking you are the one that needs to show a little smarts anon!

Anonymous said...

RB said...

So just how am I getting "smart" with you Anon, when all did was to I respond directly to your post?
-----------------------------------

Ok...

More well trained TSA employees or someone talking without knowing?

How was I supposed to take the "well trained TSA employees" part? It came off as being "smart" or being a quip. The TSA isn't perfect; however, there are TSOs out there that know how to do their job.


And just how would I be able to know that there are more than one type of pat down when TSA operates with secret rules much like the Stazi of old East Germany?


A full body pat down isn't a secret. Thousands of people get it everyday because they can't go through the WTMD due to a medical condition. Some people even specifically request it.

Also is "getting smart with me" some kind of threat?

It isn't a threat.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
RB said...

So just how am I getting "smart" with you Anon, when all did was to I respond directly to your post?
-----------------------------------

Ok...

More well trained TSA employees or someone talking without knowing?

How was I supposed to take the "well trained TSA employees" part? It came off as being "smart" or being a quip. The TSA isn't perfect; however, there are TSOs out there that know how to do their job.


And just how would I be able to know that there are more than one type of pat down when TSA operates with secret rules much like the Stazi of old East Germany?

A full body pat down isn't a secret. Thousands of people get it everyday because they can't go through the WTMD due to a medical condition. Some people even specifically request it.

Also is "getting smart with me" some kind of threat?

It isn't a threat.

April 27, 2010 11:24 AM
.................
I believe and it seems to be fact based on accounts by travelers that TSA employees are not well trained. No one said all TSA employees are poorly trained.

As far as pat downs go please post a link to the various procedures used by TSA. Being able to educate myself on how TSA conducts these pat downs is the only way it is not secret.

Your comment "are you getting smart with me" certainly seemed to me as a threat. Sounds like something a cop would say.

Do you work for TSA?

Are you afraid to say or just ashamed to admit it?

Anonymous said...

"RB said... Your comment "are you getting smart with me" certainly seemed to me as a threat. Sounds like something a cop would say.

Do you work for TSA?

Are you afraid to say or just ashamed to admit it?

April 27, 2010 12:44 PM"

And RB wonders why people don't converse with her. -1

RB said...

Anonymous said...
"RB said... Your comment "are you getting smart with me" certainly seemed to me as a threat. Sounds like something a cop would say.

Do you work for TSA?

Are you afraid to say or just ashamed to admit it?

April 27, 2010 12:44 PM"

And RB wonders why people don't converse with her. -1

April 27, 2010 12:55 PM
.........
So you seem to be ashamed to admit that you work for TSA.

Good show Anon!

TSOWilliamReed said...

avxo said...
TSOWillianReed wrote: "It was found because of the WBI scanner. If the passenger would have walked through the scanner it would have been found."

No. It might have been found. There's a difference between might have and would have. Words have meaning.

You speak as if the technology is infallible, when it demonstrably isn't. Items can still be sneaked through as can be seen in this video: http://www.americablog.com/2010/01/german-tv-highlights-failings-of-body.html

That's not to say that the scanners aren't an improvement over the old metal detectors -- they are. But they are not a panacea, and you (and others from TSA) should stop talking about them as if they are.

Of course, it's possible (albeit not probable) that you simply didn't know and were just repeating what a supervisor, trainer or colleague told you. I half-wish that isn't the case, because if it is, that says something about the TSA.

April 23, 2010 11:08 PM
--------------

Your video is funny, that is not a backscatter machine at least not the ones used by TSA so your point is null and void. If the machine can detect a bag of powder the size of a quarter, then it cant find a chunk of plastic over 6" long? Yeah right, the machine is responsible for the find of this knife because if the passenger had walked through a checkpoint with a simple standard WTMD and no scanner then the knife may have not been found. But because he entered a checkpoint with the scanner and opted out of the scanning for whatever reason (probably didn't want the knife to be found) then the knife was found on the required pat down that everyone that doesn't want to go through the scanner gets to recieve. If the scanner was not there then the last line of defense would have been the BDO's and the screeners noticing the passenger acting suspicious. Therefor the mere presence of the machine was the factor in catching this knife not the actual scanning but the presence.

TSOWilliamReed said...

RB said...
TSOWilliamReed said...
RB said...
Bob, you first claim that the knife pictured is plastic, then later claim it is ceramic. So which is it Bob?

Regardless the item was not found by WBI PORNO STRIP SEARCH MACHINES.

Shouldn't the picture be deleted from this thread since it is not only misleading but also off topic to the discussion?

April 22, 2010 9:51 AM
----------------

It was found because of the WBI scanner. If the passenger would have walked through the scanner it would have been found. He decided not to go through it and recieved a pat down instead therefore still finding the knife. If he went through a WTMD he would not have alarmed and would not have recieve a pat down resulting in the knife going through. Therefore the WBI scanner is responsible for finding the knife.

April 23, 2010 12:05 PM
....................
Aren't people subject to pat down even if they do not alarm the WTMD?

And why wouldn't a BDO pick up on a person hiding a hand weapon while being screened?

April 23, 2010 12:28 PM

-----------------

They are subject to a different pat down that is not as thorough and only randomly, not every person. BDO's probably would have caught him but the presence of the machine caught the guy, once again layers of security.

TSOWilliamReed said...

Anonymous said...
"It was found because of the WBI scanner. If the passenger would have walked through the scanner it would have been found. He decided not to go through it and recieved a pat down instead therefore still finding the knife. If he went through a WTMD he would not have alarmed and would not have recieve a pat down resulting in the knife going through. Therefore the WBI scanner is responsible for finding the knife."

Why should we believe you? Every single thing TSA has told us about these machines has turned out to be a lie so far. Odds are you're just trying to spin the fact that we caught Bob using this deceptive image in the first place.

Bob, what's the name and contact information of your direct supervisor?

TSA, why do you think we should be subject to sexual battery before flying?

April 24, 2010 1:47 AM
-------------

I would please like to see your list of lies that have been made about this machine and every other TSA policy out there and please only include the ones you know are lies not the ones you just think are lies.

TSOWilliamReed said...

Anonymous said...
"RB said... Your comment "are you getting smart with me" certainly seemed to me as a threat. Sounds like something a cop would say.

Do you work for TSA?

Are you afraid to say or just ashamed to admit it?

April 27, 2010 12:44 PM"

And RB wonders why people don't converse with her. -1

April 27, 2010 12:55 PM
-------------------

I like to converse with RB we have good times! RB is my favorite poster on this blog and I am happy to answer all of the questions RB throws at me to the best of my ability.

Anonymous said...

RB said...

So you seem to be ashamed to admit that you work for TSA.

Good show Anon!
-----------------------------------

That post isn't mine. If I was ashamed that I work for TSA, I wouldn't be posting here. It is a job to me. Nothing more and nothing less.

As far as pat downs go please post a link to the various procedures used by TSA. Being able to educate myself on how TSA conducts these pat downs is the only way it is not secret.

http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/specialneeds/editorial_1567.shtm

You may request a pat-down inspection in lieu of going through the metal detector or being handwanded. You do not need to disclose why you would like this option.

I cannot explain the whole procedure because it falls under the dreaded SSI; however, "a pat-down inspection" means "a full body pat-down". Additionally, "full body" means "full body". Basically, you have to experience it to know about it.


Your comment "are you getting smart with me" certainly seemed to me as a threat. Sounds like something a cop would say.


If it was a threat, my post would of been denied. Right? It seems you are grasping at straws with this. I already told you it wasn't a threat. By the way, you are misquoting me.

Jim Huggins said...

Anonymous writes:

I cannot explain the whole procedure because it falls under the dreaded SSI; however, "a pat-down inspection" means "a full body pat-down". Additionally, "full body" means "full body". Basically, you have to experience it to know about it.

That makes no sense.

If I receive a full body pat-down, I can post a detailed description of the patdown I received to any blog, and not be in violation of any regulations. Yet, if a TSO posts a description of the patdown, the TSO is disclosing SSI?

Anonymous said...

"If I receive a full body pat-down, I can post a detailed description of the patdown I received to any blog, and not be in violation of any regulations. Yet, if a TSO posts a description of the patdown, the TSO is disclosing SSI?"

Indeed, to hear TSA employees talk about how very super-duper top-secret SSI makes things, the mere act of PERFORMING such a pat-down should be considered a violation of SSI...

Anonymous said...

Jim Huggins said...

That makes no sense.

If I receive a full body pat-down, I can post a detailed description of the patdown I received to any blog, and not be in violation of any regulations. Yet, if a TSO posts a description of the patdown, the TSO is disclosing SSI?
-----------------------------------

I am not claiming that in my post. If you tried to post the whole procedure on here, your post will probably be denied. If you try to post the whole procedure on a blog, odds are that the TSA will contact that blog asking to remove the information.

It is all about the specifics!

RB said...

Anonymous said...
RB said...

So you seem to be ashamed to admit that you work for TSA.

Good show Anon!
-----------------------------------

That post isn't mine. If I was ashamed that I work for TSA, I wouldn't be posting here. It is a job to me. Nothing more and nothing less.
.............
Your link does not discuss the various types of pat downs. Nor do I see anything stating ones wallet must be removed.

Want to try again?

avxo said...

TSOWilliamReed wrote: "Your video is funny, that is not a backscatter machine at least not the ones used by TSA so your point is null and void. If the machine can detect a bag of powder the size of a quarter, then it cant find a chunk of plastic over 6" long? Yeah right, the machine is responsible for the find of this knife because if the passenger had walked through a checkpoint with a simple standard WTMD and no scanner then the knife may have not been found. But because he entered a checkpoint with the scanner and opted out of the scanning for whatever reason (probably didn't want the knife to be found) then the knife was found on the required pat down that everyone that doesn't want to go through the scanner gets to recieve."

Perhaps it's not the model used by TSA, but all these machines operate on the same principle.

The point I was trying to make -- which you whitewashed over -- was (a) that the machine was not responsible for the discovery of the knife by a TSO and (b) that you and others in TSA are incorrectly describing these machines as an unfailing panacea when they are neither unfailing nor a panacea.

The fact is that these machines won't detect anything that a user has secreted inside their mouth or another body cavity. And chances are the machines won't find what an obese person secretes inside folds of their skin.

Yes, the machines are an improvement over "ye olde metal detector" despite their shortcomings. No, they aren't a panacea.

Anonymous said...

"try to post the whole procedure on a blog, odds are that the TSA will contact that blog asking to remove the information."

And the legal basis for the takedown request/demand would be what?

Anonymous said...

"And the legal basis for the takedown request/demand would be what?"

Panic, stupidity, and lies, like everything else TSA does.

Anonymous said...

And still nobody has answered my perfectly valid question. Why try to sneak a knife past the checkpoint when you can grab one from one of the restaurants in the sterile area?

Answer: Because this is all security theater.

Anonymous said...

RB said...

Your link does not discuss the various types of pat downs. Nor do I see anything stating ones wallet must be removed.

Want to try again?
-----------------------------------

Just trust me on removal of the wallet for full body pat-down. Additionally, other people that work for the TSA can confirm the removal of your wallet during a full body pat-down is required. You really cannot get the full specifics of the various pat-downs that the TSA uses because it would fall under SSI. But, the general names of the pat-downs are limited pat-down and full body pat-down.

[i]And the legal basis for the takedown request/demand would be what?[/i]

I believe a violation of a few categories under SSI.

Anonymous said...

"BDO's probably would have caught him"

Unlikely, given that the BDO voodoo is a dismal failure (as Curtis could tell us from his own experience, right, Curtis?).

Jim Huggins said...

Anonymous writes:

If you tried to post the whole procedure on here, your post will probably be denied. If you try to post the whole procedure on a blog, odds are that the TSA will contact that blog asking to remove the information.

It is all about the specifics!


Again, that makes no sense. How can posting about a procedure that I witnessed in public be SSI?

Anonymous said...

Jim Huggins said...

Again, that makes no sense. How can posting about a procedure that I witnessed in public be SSI?
-----------------------------------

You are not getting what I am saying. I am saying that if you start posting really detailed information about the procedure (e.g., how a certain area is patted down), it would be considered posting SSI because you would be posting security screening information.

Try to videotape a pat-down on a checkpoint. I wonder what would happened...

Jim Huggins said...

Anonymous writes:


You are not getting what I am saying. I am saying that if you start posting really detailed information about the procedure (e.g., how a certain area is patted down), it would be considered posting SSI because you would be posting security screening information.


And you're not getting what I'm saying.

If I receive a pat-down using a secret procedure, IT IS NO LONGER A SECRET PROCEDURE. I now know about the procedure, even though I didn't sign any non-disclosure agreement. Consequently, I'm perfectly free to disclose whatever information about it I wish to anyone else.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
And still nobody has answered my perfectly valid question. Why try to sneak a knife past the checkpoint when you can grab one from one of the restaurants in the sterile area?

Answer: Because this is all security theater.

April 30, 2010 5:56 PM
.............
TSA doesn't like answering questions that make them look more incompetent than they already are.

Not only table knives but sharp kitchen knives are in the sterile area.

I wonder how they got there in the first place?

Oh, and I bet those ramp workers and mechanics have knives too.

More proof that TSA is about Security Theather not real Security.

Anonymous said...

Jim Huggins said...

If I receive a pat-down using a secret procedure, IT IS NO LONGER A SECRET PROCEDURE. I now know about the procedure, even though I didn't sign any non-disclosure agreement. Consequently, I'm perfectly free to disclose whatever information about it I wish to anyone else.
-----------------------------------

Yes, you are correct; however, it is still classified as SSI. SSI (the criminal law aspect) is directed at employees and not the public. If you noticed, I said the TSA might (odds are) ask the blog to remove the information. I didn't say the TSA is going to force the blog to remove the information.

If I started to post detail information about the various pat-downs, I would be in trouble because it is SSI and I am employee. I guess because I am employee I add some credibility to the information I posted. Furthermore, I can fill in gaps that someone might miss if they are a non-employee with wrong intentions trying to learn the pat-downs.

Anonymous said...

"Consequently, I'm perfectly free to disclose whatever information about it I wish to anyone else."

And fear mongers on here are threatening that action could be taken against you for: "violation of a few categories under SSI."

Without providing any legal basis (i.e. statutes) for what the violations would be.

When I was brought up I was taught that governments and organizations that acted like that were evil. I was told I had a duty as an American to change them. Even if it required laying down my life as a member of the armed services.

Things have changed.

I have met our enemy.

Us.

Anonymous said...

"Consequently, I'm perfectly free to disclose whatever information about it I wish to anyone else."

And fear mongers on here are threatening that action could be taken against you for: "violation of a few categories under SSI."

Without providing any legal basis (i.e. statutes) for what the violations would be.

When I was brought up I was taught that governments and organizations that acted like that were evil. I was told I had a duty as an American to change them. Even if it required laying down my life as a member of the armed services.

Things have changed.

I have met our enemy.

Us.

Landscape Photography said...

Is there any indication when the Advanced Imaging Technology will be rolled out at all other airports across the US?

Obviously it's not really enhancing security unless all or most of the airports are using the technology.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Jim Huggins said...

Again, that makes no sense. How can posting about a procedure that I witnessed in public be SSI?
-----------------------------------

You are not getting what I am saying. I am saying that if you start posting really detailed information about the procedure (e.g., how a certain area is patted down), it would be considered posting SSI because you would be posting security screening information.

Try to videotape a pat-down on a checkpoint. I wonder what would happened...

May 3, 2010 1:26 PM
.............
The public is not bound by TSA's make believe SSI. If we learn something about TSA procedures we can discuss it all we want.

Photography in a public place is not against the law.

Go back and read the blog post concerning this subject.

Now if you want a civil rights lawsuit on your hands try stopping people from doing legal things.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Jim Huggins said...

Again, that makes no sense. How can posting about a procedure that I witnessed in public be SSI?
-----------------------------------

You are not getting what I am saying. I am saying that if you start posting really detailed information about the procedure (e.g., how a certain area is patted down), it would be considered posting SSI because you would be posting security screening information.

Try to videotape a pat-down on a checkpoint. I wonder what would happened...

May 3, 2010 1:26 PM

..............
Anon, the public is not constrained by SSI in any way.

Also if you go back and read the blog post about photography you will learn that taking pictures in a public place is not generally against any laws, even when it is a TSA checkpoint.

Anonymous said...

I keep seeing claims that the scanner 'would' have caught the ceramic knife. Yet, the scanner cannot see through flesh. I, and I'm sure a lot of other people, have a bit of a 'beer-belly'. I could easily lift my belly, place that knife under it, and then walk right through the scanner. It can't look under my belly, it won't see the knife.
Same goes for women with large breasts, (or their other body cavities) although a 6 inch knife might be a little too much to hide in that case. :-)

Flier said...

I fly all the time and current scanning devices never detect half of the "contraband" I carry. Case in point: a month ago flying out of SFO, TSA arrogantly grabs a water bottle from a young man holds it up and scolds the entire line not to fly with water and then flings it into a trash bin in the middle of the line where we are all standing. Hope it wasn't a real explosive!

Then I saunter through with, let's see ... large bottle of hand sanitizer in my bag, couple of tubes of lip balm in my bag and in my pockets, eye drops (several in bag), toothbrush and toothpaste (full size) in my bag. I kindly take off my belt, shoes, and jacket and lay my cell phone and keys in the bowl, but all my liquids and gets, many of which exceed the 1 oz size and none of which are in the 1 quart ziplock, are not even detected.

Good job as always TSA!

avxo said...

Flier said: "TSA arrogantly grabs a water bottle from a young man holds it up and scolds the entire line not to fly with water and then flings it into a trash bin in the middle of the line where we are all standing."

This post touches on something that I think is interesting. I've observed similar incidents myself.

Bob, does TSA have a policy prohibiting this sort of thing, or is it "acceptable" for a TSO to publicly humiliate someone going through a checkpoint by making an example out of him, as a "reminder" (or deterrent) to the rest of us?

Anonymous said...

Flier said...

Good job as always TSA!
-------------------------------------

Airport screening at SFO is done by a private company (Covenant Aviation Security). However, I have personally seen TSOs do it before. I tend to roll my eyes at it.

Anonymous said...

TSA is always ridiculed for their procedures. Ppl always complaining about elderly men and women being harrassed about applesauce. Im so over the complaining. You dont like the security measures at the airport. Don't fly! Id rather be safe than sorry, and im sure the full body scanner isnt set in place for kicks, and to violate our privacy. Im sure majority of us they dont want to see in the scanner anyway. Ppl get over yourself. How soon we forget the events that took place coming up on 9 yrs ago.

Anonymous said...

I'm all for security and the al body scan. However, you are separating the passenger from their carry on luggage, and other items for xray. This leaves the passenger exposed to easy theft. Especially of expensive computers and phones. If you are utilizing this in more airports. There needs tonbe a separate screening keeping passengers and their carry-ons secured and away from other passengers. Perhaps you should look at this a a possible security breach environment by multiple criminals.

RB said...

70% in NBC New York poll ‘furious’ at arrival of airport body scanners

http://www.prisonplanet.com/70-in-nbc-new-york-poll-%E2%80%98furious%E2%80%99-at-arrival-of-airport-body-scanners.html

The poll is a continued indicator that widespread opposition to the use of ‘naked’ body scanners is on the rise. A series of reports show that the technology is insufficiently tested, is likely to prove ineffective, violates privacy, Constitutional rights & child porn laws, and may pose serious health risks, including cancer.

Anonymous said...

"ppl get over yourselves, how soon we forget the events of 9 years ago..."
I have never forgotten this was the first day a hijacked plane was used as a weapon against a significant ground target, and less than an hour later brave passengers who just became aware of this probability did what we can be sure will happen should it ever be attempted again.
That being said the TSA has a difficult job here balancing public safety, civil rights and the unreasonable demands of critics using hindsight should the worst happen again. "Virtual Strip Search" as some are calling it needs to be tinkered with to find its place in that balance, and protocol establishing a uniform policy concerning private valuables needs to be firmly defined.
Attacking TSA employees as a whole assuming they are criminals is not helping the matter at all.

eoaroadshow said...

You probably won't post this, but don't you think that treating the people like cattle, looking at their naked bodies, including children's and making everyone fearful with your bloated hype of the threats out there is exactly what the real terrorists want? One of the goals of terrorism is to upset people's lives and make them fearful. It looks like the TSA is doing their(the terrorist's) job.

We are much more likely to die by being struck by lightning or in a car accident than being the victim of a terror attack, and that's not because of the "good" job TSA is doing. It's just a fact of life even from way back before the TSA and 9/11.

Other countries across the globe are not doing this so why are we? Are we really the land of the free and brave or are we the land of the scared and imprisoned?

We are possibly the land of the ignorant and greedy. You see without terrorism and the scary bogeyman carrying a pocket knife on a plane, the TSA wouldn't have a job and all those wonderful millions will sent elsewhere. Yes the TSA is here to stay, here to terrorize, and here to earn lots of money keeping us "safe".

I feel so safe now. Thank you TSA.

Anonymous said...

I suppose that we could all have a pre-flight requirement that says we are not allowed to eat 24 hrs prior to departure and we have to strip naked before boarding. Soon to be? As absurd as that may sound...maybe we need to reflect on where we are currently.
Who is looking forward to traveling to see the Grandkids this Christmas?

warm&fuzzy1 said...

I so look forward to visiting the grandkids this holiday season. Just like a visit to the Doc. No eating 12 hrs. prior to flight and bend over. Don't forget to look to the left and cough. BTW...Have a Merry Christmas. How much did that cough cost me as a tax payer?

warm&fuzzy1 said...

Did I unwillingly help pay for this?
Hmmm......

Nolan said...

Hey TSA Bloggers, you have a great site here. I was wondering if you guys had extended explosives detection systems (such as http://blog.tsa.gov/2008/03/how-we-do-what-we-do-baggage-screening.html) to your carry-on and on-body scanning systems. It seems that this would increase the ability of preventing the Christmas bomb case and perhaps not require as many body scans and personal searches. I'm curious to hear your guys' opinions!

Anonymous said...

Of all the blogs on this subject I have read seems like a lot are concerned over your wallet being out of your sight how hard is it to zip it into your carryon bag before you go through. Plus I’ve not read one blog over passengers concerned over their laptop computer it’s out of your control plus your cell phone, your bags and everything else you bring to the airport. I have also been reading about passengers saying we haven’t found any real threats to the airplanes but nobody has talked about there haven’t been any terrorist attacks since the TSA took over.

Anonymous said...

TSA is just another way to get people that can't find jobs work. The truth is PROFILE! I will not be flying every again. And again the underware bomber, how does any of this apply to him? Oh right it does not. He would have passed right through.

mas ihsan said...

I noticed that the article doesn't actually mention the knife that is shown. succesfull for you..

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